The Tolkienic Song of Ice and Fire

The Tolkienic Song of Ice and Fire

Few works of literature are as dear to my heart as J.R.R. Tolkien’s novels, collectively forming ‘the Legendarium‘, and George R.R. Martin’s literary saga, A Song of Ice and Fire, and its companion books, such as The World of Ice and Fire and The Knight of the Seven Kingdoms. My blog and this particular essay are dedicated to exploring those rich ‘secondary worlds’, and primarily their mythological, literary and historical inspirations. The text you are presently reading was created because of my deep admiration of both aforementioned authors, their literary mastery, brilliant storytelling and enthralling worldbuilding. As you read, some theses and conclusions I’m  going to present might seem incorrect or unfounded, but I hope to provide you with enough evidence of my arguments, so that you can understand my position, even if you disagree with it. After all, only GRRM himself knows which aspects of his own world were inspired by Tolkien.

With this essay, I simply mean to acquaint as many people as possible with the ideas and worlds of both Tolkien and Martin, showing their greatness and skill. Sadly, I have noticed that A Song of Ice and Fire became a polarising topic at many forums and sites dedicated to Tolkien, while – quite regrettably –  the same is true about the Legendarium among many Martin fans. With this essay, I intend to bridge the gap between those two fandoms. Most ASOIAF and LOTR fans appreciate the close relationship of the two fantasy novels, in particular the deep lore in both worlds. However, it is well-known that Martin has critiqued some aspects of LOTR (the oft-quoted mention of Aragorn’s tax policy, for example), which has led to an ongoing debate within the fandom about the extent of JRRT’s influence on GRRM and the particular ways in which Martin is responding to Tolkien. Unfortunately, some corners of the internet have taken this to the extremes, but I hope that this essay will bridge some of the gaps between the worlds of Tolkien and Martin, so that we can gauge their relationship in a constructive and positive light.

Before we continue, please allow me to give credit where it is due. Naturally, I must pay homage to those literary giants, J.R.R. Tolkien and George R.R. Martin, for giving us those works of great beauty and merit, which have charmed and doubtlessly will charm, countless readers all around the world. Secondly, I must express my undying gratitude towards LML, founder of the excellent The Mythical Astronomy of Ice and Fire and many members of the wonderful group of people centered around it – Joe Magician, Crowfood’s Daughter, Darry Man, Ravenous Reader, Maester Merry, Rusted Revolver, Melanie, Isobel Harper, Archmaester Aemma, Pat, Sandra, Sweetsunray, Painkiller Jane (and so many others), without whose example, encouragement and guidance I could never hope to write this essay.

Well, I imagine that you would like to hear what this text will be about. The first part of this episode will focus on George R.R. Martin’s approach to Tolkien. I will show why, in my opinion, to say that GRRM is ‘anti-Tolkienic’ would be a gross overgeneralization of the fact that there are areas where those two authors disagree, that there are some specific elements of Tolkien’s Legendarium GRRM would prefer differently if he was its author.

From this section, discussing Tolkien and Martin in general, I’ll move to more specific examples of references to the Legendarium in GRRM’s works. Those homages are fairly obvious, so I’ll simply list several of them, leaving those which require some more explanation and evidence for later. What (I think) is really interesting, and what we shall discuss in part three of this essay, are parallels in themes and motifs, common influences, and all those deeper references to The Lord of the Rings and The Silmarillion in ASOIAF (more profound than simple namedrops or nods to Tolkienic characters and locations in heraldry, geography and names). I intend to show how Martin develops some Tolkienic ideas or ‘dialogues’ (in literary sense) with those themes, tropes and concepts from the Legendarium he disagrees with, or agrees only partially. Several quotes I will present shortly show that while there can be absolutely no doubt that George R.R. Martin greatly admires Tolkien, there are some aspects of Professor’s novels (especially those deep, often philosophical topics) he does not like or agree with. But, this – of course – does not mean that GRRM is anti-Tolkienic. The absurdity of such claims will hopefully become apparent.

IMG_Mononoke_20180430_183124_processed.jpg

My bookshelf, note the number of J.R.R.T. and G.R.R.M. books


In a coat of orange or a coat of blue…

But before we move on, I think that I should introduce myself. While many of you might know me, or at least have heard about me, for example in LML’s The Stark that Brings the Dawn episode, where my Númenor theory has been featured (huge thanks!), for many more this essay will be the first contact with ‘Bluetiger’.

Although this episode is supposed to be about J.R.R.T. and GRRM, I believe that it is always good to know at least some basic facts about the author of the text I’m reading. In this case this ‘author’ is me, so I will provide you with a short summary of my ‘literary’ life (books I adore, authors I admire and so on), so you understand why I approach literature and especially fantasy the way I do.

My real name is Mateusz, the Polish equivalent of ‘Matthew’.  I was born in Poland, where I have lived ever since. Honestly, I don’t remember a period in my life when I have not listened to books read by my parents or read them myself. But the first books that had some major impact on me were The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis. The Voyage of the Dawn Treader and The Last Battle were my favourites. Thanks to Lewis, I discovered the amazing world of Greek and Roman mythologies. I read the myths as retold by Polish classical antiquity scholar Jan Parandowski. During my primary school years, I even participated in several ‘knowledge mythology’ contests. But at that time, all mythologies I knew were the Classical ones. I was not aware of the timeless beauty of the Norse mythology, nor of Celtic tales. Concurrently, I became a fan of comic books, notably Calvin and Hobbes and Donald Duck (especially those by Carl Barks and Don Rosa). Strangely, it was a Scrooge McDuck comic borrowed from school library that first provided me with a glimpse of the northern tales (yes, Kalevala was written in the 19th century, but still, it is based on older legends from Finland). I enjoyed The Quest of Kalevala, but for some time, the references (often humorous) to the original Kalevala found in the comic were the full extent of my knowledge about any myths not Mediterranean.

Fortunately, that was about to change. The first Tolkien book I received was The Hobbit, but I simply put it inside my bookcase. For reasons that puzzle me to this day, I came to believe that the Middle-earth was supposed to lie under our own Earth’s crust, just like The Underland and Bism from The Silver Chair were under the continent upon which most of Narnia takes place. Well, when I was in kindergarten, I believed that Star Wars are about medieval-style kings who rule various Solar System planets and bombard one another other with cannons. I guess that the lesson to be remembered from this is ‘never judge a book by its cover’. Or rather, its description on the wrapper.

Honestly, I have no idea who writes those summaries for some books, but sometimes those ‘descriptions’ have little to do with the actual story the readers gets. For that matter, certain Polish edition of A Game of Thrones has a ‘summary’ on its back. According to that ‘brilliant’ advertisement, the evil tyrant king, Aerys, managed to escape from the rebels, but finally he was brought to justice by one of his guards. I’m glad GRRM’s story was so much better than the one on the wrapper.

Thankfully, in December 2010 my parents gave me another Tolkien book for Christmas. The Silmarillion. Many readers claim that this is not a book for children, that it’s dry, full of details impossible to remember… supposedly if you read it first, before The Hobbit and LOTR, you will surely lose your interest for Tolkien. Well… for me, it was quite the opposite. I absolutely loved the book. It was a mythology, just like the retellings of Greek myths I’d read… but it was better. It spoke to me, and for the first time, while reading, that fictional world seemed as real as my own. Sometimes even more real. In the following months and years, I’d go on to read all Tolkien texts I could get my hands on. I received my copy of LOTR (in Polish) for my birthday in 2012. On the 21st of December, where my peers were excited about ‘the end of the world’, supposedly foretold by the Maya Calendar, I was excited because I found out that my local library has bought The Children of Húrin. And after the ‘Class Christmas Eve Supper’ (it was the final day before holiday break from school), I went to borrow it. Oh, those sweet days…

After Tolkien’s novels, I eagerly sought out similar complexity, detail and worldbuilding but I struggled to find books that satisfied that appetite. After Tolkien’s novels, I eagerly sought out similar complexity, detail and worldbuilding but I struggled to find books that satisfied that appetite. For instance, when reading Harry Potter for another contest, I found some scenes or chapters interesting, but I struggled to immerse myself in that world; it just didn’t seem real to me. At the same time, I see why other readers would love it. Don’t misunderstand me, I have a deep respect for JK, although there are so many topics on which I disagree with her. As an aspiring author myself, I really admire all writers. Simply, I’m not a huge fan of those books.

So I searched for other authors, but apart from Sherlock Holmes stories, various Classical novels (by Mark Twain, Jules Verne, Alexandre Dumas) and some Star Wars Expanded Universebooks, I spent most of my reading time re-reading Tolkien. At the same time, I noticed the following pattern about myself: first I’m totally ignorant when it comes to some universe, but if I read about it, often accidentally, and it turns out to be gripping, I often become its devout fan and expert of all trivia.

Still, few of those books were as to me absorbing as Tolkien’s. Thus came summer 2014. By pure chance I came across some articles and YouTube clips about Game of Thrones, the TV show, and the books it was based on. Well, I heard about ASOIAF before. But it was advertised as ‘new Tolkien’. Few slogans would prevent me from checking some new nobel as much as this one. But initially, I thought that GRRM was just one of those ‘Tolkien imitators’. So until July 2014, I had only a vague idea who is George R.R. Martin.

But this time, I decided to give this ‘GOT’ a try. And how would I know if I would like it ? From its Wiki of course! Here I should explain that since Star Wars Expanded Universe was so massive, it was quite impossible to know all planets, locations, historical events, characters… So I became used to checking Polish Star Wars Wiki and English Wookieepedia. And thus I spent some time skimming A Wiki of Ice and Fire… and this time, I found that the fictional world I was reading about me was convincing. The heraldry, the maps, the Houses… Oh, and the names, while not sounding Tolkienic, sounded ‘cool’. They were not generic fantasy names that sounded like gibberish. Tywin Lannister. Stannis Baratheon. Ser Kevan Lannister. Lord Eddard Stark… I decided that I should read this ASOIAF, at least the first volume. And so I did. Well, ever since, ASOIAF is as dear as Tolkien’s Legendarium to me… I finished the first four books in about one month (fortunately I had holidays back then). A Dance with Dragons took one month, but mainly because school began in September. And then, mere weeks after I finished ASOIAF book 5, The World of Ice and Fire was published! With illustrations by Ted Nasmith, one of my favourite artists, whose artwork in The Silmarillion I adored! And thus was born my passion for ASOIAF, lasting to this day.

Then I joined Westeros.org Forum, and via this board, I became familiar with LML’s The Mythical Astronomy of Ice and Fire series. I was amazed. Even before, ASOIAF seemed deep enough for me… but when I saw all those hidden symbolic meanings, complex metaphors, fractal patterns, the story within a story, the countless references to myths from all around the world! Finally, in June 2016, my friend convinced me to translate some essays by LML to Polish and publish them at Ogień i Lód (Polish ASOIAF forum). Later, as that project grew, I decided to set up this very blog, The Amber Compendium. And then I began noticing all those references to Tolkien in George R.R. Martin’s novels, and I felt even more sympathy towards him. So, inspired by LML’s project, I decided to write my own essay(s) about Tolkienic influences in ASOIAF. But at the same time, I noticed that some people in the Tolkien fandom did not value or appreciate the complexities of Martin’s work and vice versa; personally, I find it quite sad that, in some conversations about LOTR and ASOIAF, it becomes clear that certain bitterness has entered into the comparative analysis of these two works of fantasy and that people may then be missing out on some fantastic literature because they have been turned off it by that bitterness. And with this essay, I’ll try to show you GRRM’s true approach to Tolkien.

That’s (more or less) why and how I’m here today.

IMG_Surf_20180501_114544_processed.jpg

‘I want to see mountains again, Gandalf, mountains!’ (photo taken by BT in the Beskid Mountains in Poland, with special effects added)


Part I: George R.R. Martin’s approach to Tolkien

Gil-galad was an Elven-king…

When The Fellowship of the Ring first came out, one of its reviewers, Edwin Muir, wrote the following words: ‘only a masterpiece could survive the bombardment of praise directed at it from the blurb’. This comment was, of course, ironic. Mr. Muir was referring specifically to advertisement of LOTR written by Tolkien’s friend C.S. Lewis, which the publisher put at that book’s back cover. But from my own experience with literature, I can say that it is quite often the case that ‘praise’ and ‘description’ of some novel does it more harm or good. Instances where it’s fairly obvious that the journalist or salesman has actually never read the book he’s ‘praising’ aside, even recommendations written with the best intentions can be harmful to both the author and his work. How many fans of Tolkien, Howard, Zelazny or Jordan put ASOIAF away when they saw a description where George R.R. Martin was called ‘the new Tolkien or Vance or [here you may insert any popular fantasy or sci-fi writer]… Most of them have previously seen a dozen poorly written books with the very same blurb.

Here are some ‘words of praise’ for GRRM and his saga:

Of those who work in the grand epic-fantasy tradition, Martin is by far the best. In fact… this is as good a time as any to proclaim him the American Tolkien. […] Tolkien’s work has enormous imaginative force, but you have to look elsewhere for moral complexity. A Feast for Crows isn’t pretty elves against gnarly orcs. – Time

It’s addictive reading and reflects our current world a lot better than The Lord of the Rings– Rolling Stone

Tolkien is dead. And long live George Martin. – The New York Times

While most of what those reviewers are saying is true, their words, nonetheless, might give a wrong impression – that George R.R Martin is anti-Tolkienic.  Needlessly, two camps came into existence. Those who fiercely defend Tolkien and slate GRRM, and those who act conversely. Sometimes it seems that it’s next to impossible to belong to both fandoms and love both fictional words; Arda and the Known World. As if we couldn’t simply accept that J.R.R.T. and G.R.R.M. are different people, with their own personal histories, preferences and different areas of interest. Isn’t seeing someone else’s perspective on life (and all its aspects) one of the main reasons why people read books at all? If all modern fantasy authors were exactly like Tolkien, the genre would be impossibly boring, don’t you think?

In this section I’d like to show you some quotes from George R.R. Martin, clearly showing his deep admiration and respect for Tolkien.

The first one comes from Dreamsongs: A RRetrospective (a collection of GRRM short stories from various stages of his literary career). In one of biographical sections of that book, Martin explains how he first came into contact with Tolkien’s books.

During his ‘senior year of high school’ George would read a magazine called Cortana (he even sent his own story to be published there. The moment he did so, the paper went out of print and never released another issue). It is via this paper – an article by Clint Bigglestone, to be more precise – that GRRM first heard about Tolkien and The Lord of the Rings. (By the way, it seems that now we know after whom House Bigglestone from the Riverlands was named). Few months later he noticed a paperback edition of The Fellowship at bookstall and ‘did not hesitate’.

Dipping into the fat red paperback during my bus ride home, I began to wonder if I had not made a mistake. Fellowship did not seem like proper fantasy.

Here GRRM remembers how puzzled he was when he’s read about ‘pipe-weed’ and noted how Robert E. Howard’s (famous for his Conan the Barbarian stories) tales would always begin with some giant serpent or ‘axe cleaving someone’s head in two’. George was stunned when he was that this author chose to open his epic with ‘a birthday party’.

And these hobbits with their hairy feet and love of ‘taters’ seemed to have escaped from a Peter Rabbit book. Conan would hack a bloody path right through Shire, end to end, I remembered thinking. Where are the gigantic melancholies and the gigantic mirths?

But GRRM kept reading. When Tom Bombadil appeared with his ‘Hey dol! merry dol! ring a dong dillo!’, he almost gave up. Years later, when presenting his ten favourite fantasy movies, Martin would write that while he missed the Scouring of the Shire (cut from the Peter Jackson film), he did not particularly miss Tom Bombadil. (I have a theory about how the equally mysterious character from his own fantasy saga is his response to Tom, but more on this later).

Things got more interesting in the barrow downs, though, and even more so in Bree, where Strider strode onto the scene. By the time we got to Weathertop, Tolkien had me. ‘Gil-galad was an elven king’, Sam Gamgee recited, ‘of him the harpers sadly sing’. A chill went through me, such as Conan and Kull had never evoked.

I think that this ‘chill’ GRRM felt at that moment was similar to what young J.R.R. Tolkien felt when he first came across the word ‘éarendel’, while reading the Old English poem Christ I (The Advent Lyrics).

éala éarendel engla beorhtast/ ofer middangeard monnum sended

Hail Eärendel, brightest of angels / over middle-earth sent to men

In 1914 Tolkien went on to write a poem about the voyage of Eärendel the Wanderer, inspired by those verses. For many, that is the beginning of his Legendarium, his own mythology.

In a later section, when I’ll be discussing Elendil and all the events related to the Dúnedain, I’ll explain who king Gil-galad was, for those of you who have read LOTR long ago, or are not that well-versed in the history of the Middle-earth.

In an interview with Laura Miller, which you can easily find on the internet (George R.R. Martin on J.R.R. Tolkien, Birthing Dragons, The Grateful Dead, Hollywood and More), GRRM clearly admits that he realises that the influence Tolkien had on modern fantasy can not be overstated:

Laura Miller: So, let’s start talking about this new book, The World of Ice and Fire. I’ve been telling people who asked me about it that it’s sirt of The Silmarillion of your imaginary world. And you wrote it with a couple of co-authors. So I’d love to hear you talk about whether it is The Silmarillion of the Known World, and about what was it like to work with Elio and Linda.

GRRM: Oh, well, this is a book that really began with my readers and my fans. Of course, in any epic fantasy the world is a character. Setting is very important and that, I think, has certainly been true since J.R.R. Tolkien and The Lord of the Rings.

Of course, fantasy goes back to ancient times, The IliadThe Odyssey, the ballad of Gilgamesh… but Tolkien really invented modern fantasy in its current forms, and one of the things he did that was extraordinary was create Middle-earth in such detail.

If you look at some pre-Tolkien fantasy, it’s written more in a story of fairy-tale. You know, ‘once upon a time there was a king, and the king had a beautiful daughter, and there was an evil Vizier’ – and they may have names, but you won’t know, like, who was he king’s father or grandfather, or how the dynasty came to power. Or how long it has ruled, or what the neighbouring countries are. It’s all told in this fairy tale thing.

Tolkien gave us all these histories, appendixes and genealogies, and everything was rooted, and it seemed as real as England or France or Germany, when you read these things.

And since then that’s become the style for epic fantasy, so your fantasy readers now expect a fully realised ‘secondary world’, as Tolkien called it. And so certainly, that’s what I set out to create in Westeros.

Now, some of this is a magician’s trick. It really wasn’t. With Tolkien, you have to consider that Tolkien was a very unusual writer. I mean, he was a linguist and a philosopher amd he spoke Old Norse and Old English, and he was fascinated by myth.

You know, the story was almost secondary to Tolkien. He spent years creating his Silmarillion and never published it in his lifetime. And The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit were like stories set in the world he created, but for him the world creation and the creation of languages was almost primary. 

If you look at it like an iceberg – you know, they say 3/4 of iceberg is hidden below the surface – that was certainly true with Tolkien. With a lot of the fantasists who followed Tolkien, you know, it’s a magician’s trick. We have some ice on a raft, and we want you to think that there’s this huge edifice underneath, just like with Tolkien, but there really isn’t in some cases.

And that was probably true with me in the beginning, I mean, I’d begin with the story and the characters of the scene. And everything grew from that. But the world grew along with the story, and I rapidly discovered it as I got into writing – that the reader wanted to know more and more about this world.

Honestly, I don’t see how anyone who has read this interview can claim that GRRM isn’t a huge Tolkien fan… Yes, he disagrees with him on some things, but the truth, as it often turns out, is far more complex than what we initially think it was. Yes, Martin, as a writer, but also as a man, is quite different from Professor Tolkien. But this doesn’t mean that they’re adversaries. As I’ll later show, it seems that GRRM has a pattern of inserting concepts into his stories which are a kind of a ‘literary dialogue’ with his favourite authors, Tolkien amongst them. And by this I mean that GRRM purposely creates some scenes and inserts some themes into his work to show how he approaches the same problems and themes Tolkien once did.

For example, the problem of honor, loyalty and ‘doing what is really right’. Tolkien gives us Beregond, the guardsman from Minas Tirith, who decides that he has to break his orders and fight Denethor’s henchmen to save Faramir, whom the mad ruler is about to burn on a pyre. In ASOIAF, we have a very similar situation with Jaime Lannister, who slays the crazed king Aerys to save all people of King’s Landing. But while in Tolkien’s world, such good act is rewarded – later in the book Aragorn judges Beregond and decided that he shouldn’t be punished (by death) for abandoning his post, because he acted for the greater good. Beregond becomes the commander of Faramir’s personal guard. But in ASOIAF, good intentions are often overlooked, and Jaime is considered a traitor and oathbreaker.

Anyway, please note how GRRM uses very a specific Tolkienic term in that interview: secondary world. It was Tolkien who coined this phrase. Generally, it means: a fictional world which is internally consistent and has its own history, geography, cultures, where characters live and events take place. Secondary world is of course contrasted with ‘Reality’ or primary world. According to Tolkien, a devout Catholic, while the latter is created by some human author, by the means of subcreation, the former was created by God. Also, GRRM correctly points out that creation of languages was of crucial importance for Tolkien. Without his love for languages and language creation, there would be no Middle-earth. At the same time, his passion for myths and legend was an important factor as well (but when you think about it, the language and legends of any culture are largely inseparable, so it’s no wonder that Professor Tolkien became interested in both). In a letter to Milton Waldman, nowadays usually published at the beginning of The Silmarillion, after preface, Tolkien explains that his goal was to create a mythology for his country, for England. While there were so many myths available to Tolkien – Norse, Greek, Germanic, Finnish, Celtic, Arthurian tales – none were truly English.

So, if GRRM is clearly a huge Tolkien fan, why so many came to the conclusion that he’s his adversary?

I think that’s because for many people in the fandom if some writer likes Tolkien, he must be doing everything exactly the way Tolkien did it before. That’s why we have ‘Dark Lords rising’ beyond count, unnumbered ‘returning kings’ and so many ‘final battles’. But in my opinion a writer who has some creativity and imagination of his own, who actually gives Tolkien’s ideas a thought, who doesn’t simply copy them over and over and over again is much better than one who does so. GRRM tries to understand why Tolkien wrote the way he did

A quote from GRRM’s interview with TIME illustrates this:

When I read fantasy books by other writers, particularly Tolkien and some of the other people who followed Tolkien, there’s always this desire in the back of my head to reply to them: “That’s good, but I’d do this part differently,” or, “No, I think you got that wrong.”

I’m not specifically criticizing Tolkien here — I don’t want to be portrayed as blasting Tolkien. People are always trying to set up this me-vs.-Tolkien thing, which I find very frustrating because I worship Tolkien, he’s the father of all modern fantasy, and my world would never exist had he not come first! Nevertheless, I am not Tolkien, and I am doing things differently than he did, despite the fact that I think Lord of the Rings was one of the great books of the 20th century. But there is that dialogue that’s going on between me and Tolkien, and between me and some of the other people who follow Tolkien, and it’s a dialogue that’s continuing.

That’s the literary dialogue I was talking about. And I think that when it comes to GRRM and Tolkien, this ‘discussion’ between two authors is the most important part. Yes, references in names, geographical locations and even some metatextual jokes are great. But those deeper parallels and exchanges of ideas are what really matters.

Sadly, many people seem to have stopped at the undermentioned quote, often presented without its context. It became widely popular both in the ASOIAF fandom, where some people use it to criticise Tolkien… and on some Tolkien discussion boards, other fans show it to their peers in order to demonstrate how little GRRM knows and understands about the Legendarium.

Tolkien can say that Aragorn became king and reigned for a hundred years, and he was wise and good. But Tolkien doesn’t ask the question: What was Aragorn’s tax policy? Did he maintain a standing army? What did he do in times of flood and famine? And what about all these orcs? By the end of the war, Sauron is gone but all of the orcs aren’t gone – they’re in the mountains. Did Aragorn pursue a policy of systematic genocide and kill them? Even the little baby orcs, in their little orc cradles?

That’s a quote from an interview with GRRM published by The Rolling Stone… but somehow those who share it, so often fail to mention lines like these:

Ruling is hard. This was maybe my answer to Tolkien, whom, as much as I admire him, I do quibble with. Lord of the Rings had a very medieval philosophy: that if the king was a good man, the land would prosper. We look at real history and it’s not that simple. […]

 There are some people who read and want to believe in a world where the good guys win and the bad guys lose, and at the end they live happily ever after. That’s not the kind of fiction that I write. Tolkien was not that. The scouring of the Shire proved that. Frodo’s sadness – that was a bittersweet ending, which to my mind was far more powerful than the ending of Star Wars, where all the happy Ewoks are jumping around, and the ghosts of all the dead people appear, waving happily [laughs]. […]

From the 1970s, Tolkien imitators had retreaded what he’d done, with no originality and none of Tolkien’s deep abiding love of myth and history.

It’s worth to mention that at one point in time, Tolkien had plans for LOTR sequel, entitled The New Shadow, which would deal with several issues GRRM mentioned. That story would be set in the 220th year of the Fourth Age, some 100 years after Aragorn’s death, during the reign of his son Eldarion. After century of peace of prosperity, the people of Gondor would become decadent and indolent, suffering from ‘satiety with good’. Meanwhile, the descendants of King Aragorn Elessar would become similar to Denethor II, the Ruling Steward of Gondor during the War of the Ring – or worse. There would be a plot against the king, led by mysterious figure embracing occultic religion worshipping either Sauron or Morgoth (the original Dark Lord from the First Age). For the youth of Gondor, the events from LOTR and Aragorn’s reign would be but fanciful tales, and out of boredom and defiance, they’d play ‘orcs’, committing acts of vandalism in the city. Tolkien wrote several pages, but then saw that this book would be simply a thriller about how that sauronic revolution was stopped, and decided to abandon it. That extract can be found in The Peoples of Middle-earth.

As you see, Tolkien notes that in Middle-earth evil is like a ‘Dark Tree’ – it’s impossible to fully uproot it, because Morgoth corrupted the very fabric of Arda in its early days. For this reason evil always returns if humans don’t keep it in check. Morgoth fell, but Sauron rose. In turn, the second Dark Lord was followed by Saruman and lesser imitators. Tolkien wasn’t interested in writing The New Shadow, as it’d be simply another LOTR, but without Elves, Ents, Dwarves, just with humans and their nature.

Here we see one of the main difference between Tolkien and Martin: GRRM is hugely interested in politics and ‘logistics’ of power. Yes, J.R.R.T. explores some of those themes, but they’re not the main focus of his stories, their place is in the appendixes. Tolkien was interested in those metaphysical struggles between Good and Evil.

It’s worth to mention that GRRM understands that the ending of LOTR isn’t ‘happy’ but instead ‘bittersweet’, full of suffering and hope at the same time. In one interview, he noted that he’d like to evoke a similar feeling among his readers with ASOIAF’s ending.

Many readers came to conclude that Tolkien’s world is ‘black and white’, because all characters are either perfect and moral or evil. I would argue that many inhabitants of Arda are morally complex: Boromir, Denethor II, Fëanor, Túrin… but still, those are heroes or anti-heroes, not villains. Sauron and Morgoth seem purely evil, but this is because they are supposed to be demonic. Morgoth is Arda’s equivalent of the devil, and Sauron is his chief lieutenant who later tried to rule on his own. Tolkien’s works are mostly concerned with those ‘great battles’, where all have to choose between Good and the Iron Crown of Evil. Martin, meanwhile, focuses on those ‘small struggles’ – wars between nations and civil wars between rival claimants to the throne. In his world, there isn’t any character who personifies evil, people can’t unite under one banner and ride forth to defeat one Dark Lord who is clearly the bad guy (well, there are the Others, but who knows what they’re up to). GRRM is occupied with political intrigue and ‘hearts in conflict with themselves’. But while his characters are usually grey, we can judge their actions and deeds themselves can be good or evil – as LML shows in his essay (section The Morality of A Song of Ice and Fire).

Speaking of orcs, it’s important to keep in mind that many of them, called snagas by their Uruk-hai overseers, are basically slaves of Sauron, forced to serve him under the lash. The origins of orcs are unclear, but it seems that the original First Age orcs who served in Morgoth’s legions were descendants of Elves captured and corrupted by The Dark Lord. In Tolkien’s world, evil is unable to create life, it can only mock and corrupt. But it’s possible that there are many types of orcs: corrupted Elves, Men and bodies controlled by evil spirits, those of The Maiar who sided with Morgoth against The Valar. The answer to GRRM’s question about Aragorn’s treatment of ‘baby orcs’ depends on which account of their origins we accept… do ‘baby orcs’ even exists? Are all orcs evil and unable to repent? Tolkien spent much time thinking about those philosophical problems, but sadly, we don’t have any conclusive answer. GRRM’s villains are almost exclusively human. It’s worth to mention that Tolkienic human villains are also quite diverse and complex – for example, in The Silmarillion not all Easterlings are presented as evil, and in LOTR Aragorn pardons Sauron’s human allies as many were coerced into serving him with lies or threats. It is noted that they fought bravely and honourably, and when they saw that Sauron, whom they took for god, has fallen, lost hope and decided to give a last stand.

Well, those are issues we might discuss in future episodes of Tolkienic ASOIAF. Even decades after they were published, Tolkien’s books still spark new debates. I think that Martin’s works will be treated similarly in the future.

In yet another interview GRRM said that when he started his book series, he was ‘replying to Tolkien, but even more to his modern imitators‘. Indeed, when you gather all those quotations, a pattern emerges: George R.R. Martin greatly admires Tolkien, but there are some things about his works he’d do differently, so he engages in this ‘literary dialogue’ of sorts.

At the same time, he often critiques what many writers following Tolkien did, the way they thoughtlessly and uncreatively carbon copied Professor’s ideas and creations.

Therefore, we shouldn’t say that GRRM is anti-Tolkienic, but that he is critiquing those who imitate Tolkien without developing and rethinking Tolkien’s tropes and themes. The following words clearly demonstrate this approach:

I admire Tolkien greatly. His books had enormous influence on me. And the trope he established – the idea of the Dark Lord and his Evil Minions – in the hands of lesser writers over the years and decades has not served the genre well. It has been beaten to death.

The battle of good and evil is a great subject for any book, and certainly for a fantasy book, but I think ultimately the battle between good and evil is weighted within the individual human heart and not necessarily between an army of people dressed in white an an army of people dressed in black. When I look at the world I see that most real living breathing human beings are grey.

Here you see this difference in GRRM’s approach to the conflict between good and evil I mentioned a while ago. But also how he separates Tolkien, who presented this epic struggle masterfully from his imitators, who just insert Dark Lords without motivation to drive the plot forward. (In some later episode how Mairon became Sauron Gorthaur the Terrible because he believed in order and Morgoth’s supremacy over The Valar).

Another thing to consider is how author’s religious beliefs shape the world they create. For Tolkien Sauron and Morgoth have to be defeated because they pose a danger not only to the material world, but also to the spiritual. Their victory wouldn’t simply mean a military occupation of Gondor and Rohan and other lands, but also a victory of dark theocratic regime, where The Dark Lord is worshipped instead of Eru Ilúvatar, The God and Creator of Arda. This is a clear reflection of Tolkien’s Catholicism.

In Martin’s world, reflecting his atheist/agnostic worldview, it’s impossible to determine which religion is true: the Faith of the Seven? the Faith of R’hllor? The Old Gods? The Drowned God?

As horrible as Joffrey, Gregor Clegane, Ramsay Bolton and even the Others (at least as far as we know) might be, they lack the power to reshape the entire world and bend the wills of all living beings to their own dark plans. In Tolkien’s world, Iluvatar is the true god, and the Valar serve him. Those who claim to be gods, like Sauron or Morgoth, are evil. In Westeros and Essos, there are numerous religions and the reader can’t be sure which, if any, is the right one.

However, simply because there are areas where our two authors disagree, it’d be a fallacy to conclude that it’s impossible to be a fan of both and that George R.R. Martin himself is an admirer of the Legendarium. When someone tells you otherwise, show him those words (George R.R. Martin on J.R.R. Tolkien and Complex Fantasy)

I love Tolkien. I read him when I was in junior high school and he had a profound effect on me. He’s the father of all modern fantasy. We all are working in the shadow of the great mountain that is The Lord of the Rings. But that being said, Tolkien did certain things that are different than what I would do. And in the hands of some of the Tolkien imitators, those things have became clichés that I think have ultimately harmed the genre, and made people think that it’s – you know – entertainment for children or particularly slow adults.

Then Martin goes on to explain that in his opinion ‘the battle between good and evil’ is the universal theme of all literature, but it is fought in the individual human heart. GRRM notes that ‘all of us have the capacity for good, all of us have the capacity for evil’. Small wonder that his favourite LOTR character is Boromir, who – the very same day – wants to use The One Ring to defeat Sauron, says that ‘If any mortals have claim to the Ring, it is the men of Númenor, and not Halflings’, calls Frodo a traitor who will simply give the Ring to The Dark Lord and finally attacks him… and then repents and heroically dies defending Merry and Pippin… A heart in conflict indeed.

Once again, if anyone calls George R.R. Martin an ‘anti-Tolkienic writer’, remind him or her that we’re talking about the man who was deeply moved by The Fall of Gil-galad… and in his speech on fantasy, said the following words:

They can keep their heaven. When I die, I’d sooner go to middle Earth.

cropped-img_20170922_201501_processed.jpg

A waterfall in the Karkonosze Mountains in Poland, photo by BT. “Then something Tookish woke up inside [Bilbo], and he wished to go and see the great mountains, and hear the pine-trees and the waterfalls, and explore the caves, and wear a sword instead of a walking-stick.” – from The Hobbit


Part II: References to LOTR, The Hobbit and The Silmarillion in ASOIAF

The World Was Young, the Mountains Green…

As I said, the main focus of this episode is my theory claiming that The Great Empire of the Dawn and House Dayne were at least partially inspired by Númenor and the Dúnedain. But before I present it, I’d like to show some more ‘obvious’ references to Tolkien’s mythology in George R.R. Martin’s works. I imagine that if I began with those deeper parallels between the two authors, some of you could – and you’d be fully justified – start to doubt if my thesis has any credibility. After all, if GRRM was trying to convey something deeper using those hidden Tolkien references, it’s perfectly reasonable to expect some clues easier to decipher, for example clear allusions to LOTR or The Hobbit in A Song of Ice and Fire. And indeed, there are such explicit references to be found.

While I go through some of them, please keep in mind that many of those topics deserve their own sections, and probably even their own episodes. I might explore them in the future. Right now I have some plans, albeit vague, for an episode about Turin and his black sword Gurthang. That story should be especially interesting for all Mythical Astronomy fans out there, as it features dragons, meteoric iron swords, kinslaying, tragic love and some really really grey characters. Certainly, all those parallels between Theon Greyjoy and Gollum, Jon Snow and Aragorn, Aerys, Tywin and Denethor, Jaime and Beregond (and the issue honor vs. conflicting loyalties), Beorn and Craster and so on deserve our consideration. Apart from those, we have dragons and how they work in both universes, ents vs. Children of the Forest turning trees to warriors, some similarities between Sansa Stark and Luthien, Sandor ‘The Hound’ Clegane and Huan, The Hound of the Valar, the mysterious black stones and ancient structures of both ‘secondary worlds’, the common theme of kinslaying, incidents where someone decided to burn an entire armada of ships, Martin’s Sacred Order of Green Men and Tolkien’s Drúedain – The Wild Men of the Woods, Oathbreakers and ‘horns that wake the sleepers’, Barrow-downs and Barrowlands, The Long Night (in both universes), ravens, Hidden Cities of Braavos and Gondolin, the phrase Valar morghulis and The Valar, the Ringwraiths, broken oaths, the palantíri and the glass candles… and many many many more.

Of course, I wholeheartedly encourage you to do some research on your own, and of course, to read or reread all those Tolkienic texts I’m referring to. While I’ll add short summaries of fragments or books relevant to the topic we’ll be discussing, please remember that nothing can replace a real J.R.R.T. book, with all its richness, linguistic beauty, vastness of lore and details et cetera…

Still, I realise that many of you have read LOTR or The Silmarillion long ago, or not at all, and such summaries and explanations are necessary if I want you to understand how those references Martin inserts work. In today’s essay  my ‘main’ theory or rather analysis concerns Númenor and the successor states, Gondor and Arnor, founded by those of the Dúnedain who escaped its Downfall. The historical events I’ll be talking about are ancient past even for those living in Middle-earth in the final years of the Third Age. But to understand Númenor, one has to understand the history of Arda and, especially, the Tale of the Silmarils. And thus we have to go back, to times millenia before Frodo and Aragorn, to the very beginning of  days.

As I quickly (let’s hope) recount those events, I’ll insert some commentary from time to time, when we come across some event or character George R.R. Martin references in his saga. I’m going omit some plotlines, such as the Quest of Beren and Luthien, the history of The Children of Hurin or the events surrounding the birth of Maeglin, the wandering to Tuor and The Fall of Gondolin, since these are the topics I intend to explore in detail in later essays. Similarly, some chapters might be shortened to the bare minimum, for example if they are of little relevance (at least at first glance), to the ‘main’ plot of The Silmarillion. Of course, in Tolkien’s books even the most tiny details are important. But if I were to follow every single thread left by the Professor, I’m afraid this essay would have to be impossibly long. Keep in mind that this text is but an introduction to a longer series I intend to write – and who knows, maybe in some less dense episodes, there’ll be the time to talk about not only GRRM’s Tolkienic inspirations, but also about Tolkien’s own, for example from the Norse mythology or real-world history… and since GRRM often draws from the very same sources, things get really complicated. But maybe, I should say ‘complex’. And very interesting. Oh yes, since I’m a writer, at least an aspiring one, myself, it’s fascinating what two different authors can do basing on the same influence… In other words, both the Legendarium and A Song of Ice and Fire are incredibly complex, they explore multiple themes and are surely worthy of our attention.

A side note: this multitude of inspirations shows that you can’t simply look at Tolkien through the prism of, let’s say, his Norse influences without at least acknowledging aspects of his writing based on his Catholic faith or English history… People who craft theories based only on one source of GRRM’s inspiration, in my opinion, make a similar mistake… I’d say that its impossible to simply gather some parallels with, let’s say, the Ragnarok story, and claim that ASOIAF will end exactly like Ragnarok, without looking at the ramifications of all those influences from Greek myths, Celtic myths, Arthurian legends, history, Frank Herbert’s Dune, history… and Tolkien.

When it comes to Tolkien, another thing to consider is that his mythology was decades in the making, and multiple versions of some tales exists. The changes J.R.R.T. made over time are yet another fascinating topic – but not for today. Here I’ll simply focus on the most widely known accounts of those events, found in the published Silmarillion.

With that said, we may go back to the times before first Men and Elves, before even The First Age began, before the Sun and the Moon first rose, before even the stars first shone…

cropped-20883800_1944096495831505_93001687_o1.jpg

Beskid Mountains in Poland, photo by BT with special effects added.


In the beginning…

… there was only Eru Iluvatar, The One, Father of All.

First, Eru created Ainur, The Holy Ones, who were angelic beings of great might and power. They were the offspring of His thought, but each one understood only but a fragment of Iluvatar’s mind. The mightiest of those spirits was Melkor and his brother was Manwe.

And then Illuvatar inspired them with his Flame Imperishable, and they gathered to sing a song, of great harmony and complexity, a song with the power to create. The voices of the Ainur united, and fashioned the theme initially given by Iluvatar into one melody. This was Ainulindalë, The Great Music. But Melkor searched for The Flame in the vastness of the primordial Void, and when he could not find it, his mind conceived some thoughts unlike those of his brothers and sisters. And he was overpowered by a desire to create beings in his own image, for it seemed to him that Eru had no plans for the Void.Thus Melkor introduced a discord into the Great Music, and there was a great war of sound. And it seemed that it was no longer one song, but two, sang before the throne of Illuvatar simultaneously. At that moment Eru rose and the choirs of the Ainur fell silent.

Then He showed them a vision, of what their song created, The Created World. And then the Ainur watched the entire history of that universe as it would progress, and were amazed, for without them noticing, Iluvatar inserted his unique theme into the Great Music, and none of them even dared to contribute to it, so unparalleled it was. And from that melody the Children of Illuvatar came into existence, and they those were: the Firstborn, the Elves, and the Secondborn, Men. And Iluvatar said: Eä! Let these thing Be!

And the Ainur saw that the vision they saw became a reality. Eru allowed those who wished to enter this World, but still, many remained with Eru in his Timeless Halls.

The mightiest of those who chose to enter were called the Valar, but Men often mistook them for gods. The lesser ones were known as the Maiar. Together they were to shape and adorn Arda, the realm within Eä where the Children of Illuvatar were to wake, and then guide and teach them. But even as the Valar were building, Melkor came to destroy. And he gathered many followers from among the Maiar; the mightiest of those were the spirits of shadow and flame, called Balrogs and Mairon, later known as Sauron Gorthaur.

After the First War between the Valar and Melkor ended and the Dark Lord fled, Arda enjoyed its spring. The Valar decided to bring light to their realm. Two great Lamps were constructed, Illuin and Ormal. In the middle of Arda, where their light mingled, the Valar settled upon the isle Almaren in midst of The Great Lake in the center of a vast continent called Middle-earth. But Melkor and his hosts came and destroyed the Lamps, and their fall shattered the lands, causing massive destruction and conflagration. Amaren was lost, and the seas rushed inlands. The entire layout of Arda was changed. But before the Valar could bring him to justice, the Dark Lord fled to his might stronghold called Utumno, in the far north. The Valar moved to a realm in the Uttermost West, henceforth called Valinor. There Yavanna, Giver of Fruit and Queen of Earth, planted two mighty trees, silver Telperion and golden Laurelin. Meanwhile, Varda, the wife of Manwe (called the Elder King, Eru’s Regent), created stars and placed them on on the vault of heaven. Afterwards, the Valar waited for the Firstborn Children of Illuvatar to appear.

Concurrently, Aulë, The Smith decided to create beings of his own, The Dwarves. He kept that a secret from the rest of the Valar, but he could not keep it a secret from Eru. Iluvatar pointed out that dwarves were only mindless puppets, with no free will or thoughts of their own. Then Aulë raised his great hammer to destroy his minions, but Iluvatar felt pity, and decided to grant them true life.

His wife Yavanna, who deeply cared for all plants and animals of Arda, feared that the dwarves would destroy all woods of the Middle-earth to fuel their furnaces, so she asked Iluvatar to give life to the Ents, who were to protect trees from other creatures. Manwë, the Elder King, summoned spirits from afar, and created the Great Eagles, who served as his messengers.

When the Elves awoke on the shores of Lake Cuiviénen in the eastern Middle-earth, it was Melkor who found out first. The most ancient elven legends tell of an evil creature called The Hunter, who would kidnap those who wandered away alone. Fortunately, one of the Valar, Oromë, enjoyed hunting in the vast woods of ancient Middle-earth. It was him who came across the Firstborn, and named them ‘Eldar’ (The People of Stars), for he saw that above all else, they loved gazing at the Stars of Varda. The Elves called themselves Quendi, which means ‘Those Who Speak with Voices’, for they met no other creatures who could talk.

The Valar concluded that Melkor must be stopped, and thus began the great War for the Sake of Elves. The Dark Lord was defeated, captured (Sauron, on the other hand, managed to escape), bound with the great chain Angainor, and taken to Valinor, where he would spend three ages. The Elves, meanwhile, were all invited to settle in the land of Valinor in the west, as the Valar considered Middle-earth to be too dangerous, now that it was infested with Melkor’s evil creatures.

Some Elves agreed to move to Valinor, and those who arrived there after a long and perilous journey, and saw the light of The Two Trees, were called The High Elves, or Calaquendi, The Elves of the Light. But others refused – those became known as the Avari, The Refusers.

Those who set off on The Great March were divided into three tribes: The Vanyar (Fair-elves) led by by King Ingwë. Their hair was gold, and when it came to battle, their warriors fought with spears. Then came the Noldor (Deep-elves), whose ruler was Finwë. Their eyes were grey and their hair usually dark. In war, their weapon of choice was sword. The Noldor were famous for their skill with metals, gems and alloys. The third tribe were the Teleri (The Last), who called themselves Lindar (The Singers). This group was by far the largest, so they had two lords: brothers Olwë and Elwë. They fought using bows.

Of the Vanyar and Noldor, all arrived in the land of Beleriand, in the western Middle-earth, and progressed until they reached the shores of Belegaer, The Great Sea. One of the Valar, Ulmo (The King of the Sea, Lord of Waters and Dweller in the Deep) ferried them across the vast ocean on the island Tol Eressëa, The Lonely Isle, which was later placed off the coast of Valinor.

But the third host progressed slowly, and upon crossing The Great River Anduin, some of its members grew fearful and reluctant when they saw Hithaeglir, The Towers of Mist (in later ages commonly known as the Misty Mountains) looming in the distance. Therefore, the Lindar tribe was further divided – some elves under Lenwë decided to stay in that region of the Middle-earth. They were called the Nandor (Those, Who Go Back). Their descendants were the Laiquendi, The Green Elves.

The rest of the Lindar finally entered Beleriand, but since Tol Eressëa has already ‘sailed’ (carrying the Vanyar and the Noldor), they had to set up camps and wait until Ulmo could bring the island back. Meanwhile, king Elwë would wander alone in the woods. During one of those trips, he came across Melian, one of the Maiar (lesser Ainur who entered Arda, like Olórin-Gandalf and Curumo-Saruman). The king was spellbound by her beauty and great wisdom, and thus it came to be that he forgot about his people, and thus Elwë and Melian stood as if they were enchanted, even as the trees of Nan Elmoth grew higher and higher around them. Meanwhile, the time for the Teleri to set off for Valinor finally came, and his brother Olwë refused to wait. But some of Elwë’s followers decided to stay, and many years later, when the king awoke and returned to them, founded the Kingdom of Doriath. Elwë became known as King Elu Thingol (The Greycloak), and Melian became his Queen. Their daughter was Luthien, considered to be the most beautiful of all Children of Illuvatar. The elves who stayed in Beleriand and paid homage to King Thingol were called the Sindar, the Grey Elves. A group of them, called the Falathrim, lived in havens at the coast of Belegear. Their lord was Nowë, more widely known as Círdan the Shipwright. The remaining Teleri – the Falmari (The Wave-folk) finally arrived in Valinor and built the port city Alqualondë (Swanhaven).

Arda finally enjoyed peace, and the Elves prospered. But when three ages passed, Melkor was released, and deceived the Valar with words of remorse and false promises, so they let him live freely in the realm of Valinor. And thus Melkor saw that the world has changed, and hated the Elves even more than before. The Noldor interested him the most, as their skill in metallurgy and all crafts was unmatched. And among them, none was more gifted than King Finwë’s eldest son, Fëanor, The Spirit of Fire. Fëanor had two brothers, Fingolfin and Finarfin, but there was little love between them, as his mother was Finwë’s first wife, Míriel (who was so consumed by giving birth to the Spirit of Fire that her soul left the body and remained in the Halls of Mandos, the Doomsman of the Valar, where all Elves who die stay for some time, before returning to the world of the living). Finwë’s second wife was Indis of the Vanyar.

It was Fëanor who created the Silmarils, three mighty jewels of great beauty, in which the light of The Two Trees of Valinor was locked. Varda, the Queen of Stars, came and blessed them, and ever since, evil hands which dared to touch them were scorched. In order to gain those gems Melkor began his dark intrigue. Firstly, he started spreading lies and rumours among the Noldor. And Fëanor came to believe that his younger brother Fingolfin conspired to usurp his position as heir of the king, and even worse, that he planned to take the Silmarils by force. But when Fëanor, in full battle armour, entered his brother’s hall, threatening him with a sword, the Valar intervened and investigated the matter. Melkor’s treachery was revealed, but before he could be arrested, the Dark Lord left Valinor. For his attack, Fëanor was exiled to the stronghold Formenos, in the northern part of Valinor and king Finwë moved there as well.

Fëanor married Nerdanel the Wise, daughter of the famous smith Mahtan. She had auburn hair, elsewhere described as brown mixed with copper, and unusual trait among the Noldor. This feature was passed onto their seven sons, of whom Maedhros was the eldest.

Melkor, meanwhile, searched for Ungoliant, an evil spirit who assumed the shape of a monstrously large spider. Together they sneaked into Valinor, hidden under a veil of Unlight, and without being noticed, arrived at the Green Mound Ezellohar, where the Two Trees grew. And Melkor raised his dark spear, and pierced the trees, and Ungoliant came and drank their sap, and at the same time poisoning them with her venom. And as the Trees died, a great darkness fell upon the Blessed Realm of Valinor. But the Valar hoped that the Trees can still be saved, if only the part of their light encapsulated within the Silmarils is released. But only Fëanor himself knew how to break the shells made from silima, a substance he devised. But the great smith refused to annihilate his greatest creations. In the confusion of that terrible night, known afterwards as the Long Night, Melkor sacked Formenos, and all its defenders fled. Only king Finwë tried to stop him the Dark Lord from reaching the vault where the Silmarils and other treasures were stored, and he was slain. When the news reached Fëanor, he cursed Melkor, naming him Morgoth, the Dark Tyrant.

Then Fëanor and his sevens sons swore a terrible oath, that they shall pursue Morgoth and retrieve the jewels, and that no demon, Valar, Maiar, Elf, Man or creature will be allowed to stand between them and the Silmarils, that were by rights the heirloom of the House of Finwë. But as they prepared their host for the journey to follow Morgoth, who fled to his fortress of Angband in Beleriand, a messenger arrived from the Valar, and forbade them to leave Valinor.

Regardless, the Noldor set off and arrived at Alqualondë, The Swanhavens of the Teleri. There Fëanor demanded that they ferry his followers across the Great Sea to Middle-earth. But king Olwë refused. And in that dread hour, as darkness shrouded Valinor, The Spirit of Fire ordered his soldiers to sack the havens, slaughter the Teleri and steal their famed white swan-ships. And thus, for the first time, Elves fought Elves in a great Kinslaying. For that deed the Valar cursed the Noldor, and they were forbidden from ever returning to Valinor. Then Fëanor youngest brother Finarfin and his followers left the Noldor host and returned to plead for forgiveness, which they were granted. It should be noted that Finarfin’s wife was Eärwen, daughter of king Olwë himself. Their children, Finrod, Angrod, Aegnor and Galadriel did not turn back.

Then Fëanor decided that his brother Fingolfin’s Noldor are not trustworthy, so in secret, he had his own followers board on all stolen swan-ships, and they sailed for Middle-earth. Upon their landing in the Firth of Drengist, at a place called Losgar, Fëanor’s son Maedhros, who was a close friend of Fingon, asked if he should send the ships back, to ferry Fingolfin’s followers. But the Spirit of Fire laughed, as if he was mad, and gave orders to have the ships burned. It was a great fire, and the red glow was seen even by Fingolfin across the sea. Then he realised that Fëanor left them. But he was too proud to return and beg the Valar for mercy, so instead, his host set off on a long and perilous march through the frozen waste of Helcaraxë in the far north,m a voyage many did not survive.

Meanwhile, Fëanor’s army battled Morgoth’s forces (assembled for many years in secret by his chief lieutenants Sauron and Gothmog) in Beleriand. There the Spirit of Fire was killed, when his vanguard was surrounded by Balrogs. And upon his death, his fiery soul burned the body, and only ashes remained. His eldest son Maedhros assumed supreme command over Noldorin forces, but he was captured and taken to Angband, where Morgoth had him hung from a mountain cliff, by the wrist of his right hand. But then, light returned to Arda, as the Valar created the Sun and the Moon. The very moment the Moon first appeared, Fingolfin’s host, larger than Fëanor, even after so many were lost to icy waters and cold. Morgoth’s legions were decimated. Fingolfin’s eldest son Fingon ventured alone to Angband, and with the help of Thorondor, the King of Eagles, rescued Maedhros, whose right hand he was forced to cut off.

Grateful, Maedhros gave up his claim to the High Kingship of the Noldor, which was granted to Fingolfin. After the Third Battle of Beleriand, called the Glorious, Morgoth’s strength was broken, and he was confined to Angband, which remained besieged for over 400 years. In those centuries, the Noldor prospered, founding numerous strongholds, cities and kingdoms. The chief of those were:

  • Nargothrond, the subterranean city hewn in rock, the royal seat of Finrod, called Felagund, the Hewer of Caves,
  • Gondolin, the Hidden City, founded by king Turgon in a valley in the Encircling Mountains,
  • Himring, the principal stronghold in the March of Maedhros

Doriath, the realm of the Grey Elves (Sindar) was still ruled by King Thingol, but he felt little sympathy for the Noldor after he found out about the Kinslaying, where his kinsmen were slain. His city was Menegroth, Thousand Caves, a massive city and fortress hewn in rock.

During those years, called the Long Peace, Men first entered into Beleriand from the east. Those who allied with the Elves and fought against Morgoth were known as the Edain. Their principal houses were: The House of Bëor, from which descended the famous warrior Beren, The House of Haleth, who were named after Haleth, who became their Chieftain after her father and brother fell in battle with orcs, and managed to withstand a week long siege, until Noldor soldiers could arrive to relieve it. The third house was The House of Hador of whom Húrin and his son Túrin were the most renowned.

Other tribes soon followed, and those were known as the Easterling. But many of them betrayed the Elves in battle, and sided with Morgoth.

The centuries of peace and prosperity came to an end in the year 455, First Age, when Morgoth’s armies managed to break the siege. A great battle of Dagor Bragollach, The Sudden Flame, ensued. The Elven and Edain forces were burned with rivers of flame, or even worse, dragonfire, for Morgoth’s newest beasts were released. Of those the most fearsome was Glaurung, the Father of Dragons, known also as the Great Worm, the Golden and the Deceiver.

When it became apparent the battle is lost, Fingolfin, the High King of the Noldor, rode alone to the gates of Angband, and challenged Morgoth to a duel. The Dark Lord was founded with his sword, Ringil, which glittered like ice, but ultimately, the High King was slain.

Here follows the tale of Beren and Luthien, but since I have plans to explore it in detail in another episode, I’ll say only that thanks to this pair of lovers, one of the Silmarils was recovered from Morgoth’s Iron Crown, and their deeds gave the Elves and Men new hope.

Thus, in the year 472, Maedhros gathered a grand host of Men and Elves, to defeat Morgoth once and for all. Even king Turgon left his Hidden City of Gondolin, and arrived with 10 000 spearmen. But because of Easterling treachery, the power of dragonfire and might of the Balrogs, the battle ended in bloodshed. The Noldor were scattered, and the Edain armies were wiped out. During this Battle of Unnumbered Tears, Nirnaeth Arnoediad, fell Fingon, the High King of the Noldor, slain by Gothmog, Lord of the Balrog.

Now begins there tragic story of Túrin and his sister, but just like with Beren and Luthien, those events will get their own essay in the future. Suffice to say that nearly all Elven and Edain cities and realms were lost, including Nargothrond.

In Doriath, king Thingol was killed by dwarven jewel-smiths, whom he hired to embed the Silmaril Beren and Luthien brought from Angband in Nauglamir, the famed Necklace of the Dwarves. The dwarves, desiring both treasures, demanded them as their payment, and when King Greycloak refused, he was slain in his own vault in Menegroth. Then the city was sacked by plundering dwarven host. Thus began the long feud between Elves and Dwarves. But king Thingol’s grandson, Dior, the son of Beren and Luthien, returned to Doriath and restored order as its second king. But when the surviving sons of Fëanor heard that their father’s precious jewel was held by the Grey Elves, they attacked Menegroth. King Dior was slain in this Second Kinslaying and his sons were left in the wilderness to die. But his daughter, Elwing, took the Necklace with the Silmaril and fled to the coastal region near the Mouths of River Sirion. There settled many survivors from Doriath.

Four years later the last remaining Elven kingdom in Beleriand fell, when – because of kinsman’s treachery – king Turgon’s Hidden City of Gondolin was destroyed. The refugees from that realm joined Elwing’s folk. Their leader was Eärendil, the son of king Turgon’s daughter Idril and Tuor, Túrin’s kinsman. Eärendil and Elwing married, and their sons were Elrond, later known as Master of Rivendell and Elros, the future King of Númenor. But apart from their Havens and Círdan the Shipwright’s seat at the Isle of Balar, where the new High King of the Noldor, Ereinion Gil-galad fled, all of Beleriand was overrun my Morgoth’s countless legions. It seemed that for the Middle-earth all hope was already lost.

Since the events concerning Eärendil are closely related to the founding of Númenor, which, along with its successor states, Gondor and Arnor, is our main topic today, I think that the best option is to stop this summary of The Silmarillion at this point, present several references to that J.R.R. Tolkien novel found in ASOIAF and The World of Ice and Fire, and then share several homages to Tolkien’s other major books, LOTR and The Hobbit in GRRM’s writing. Then, without further interruptions, we’ll see how, at least according to my theory, GRRM used The Dúnedain and their history as source of inspiration.

14067978_1761447510763072_291082271582909310_o-1

Baltic Sea coastline, photo by BT


It’s all in the appendixes!

One of the most striking references to J.R.R. Tolkien’s works in ASOIAF are the words Valar morghulis, the motto of the Faceless Men of Braavos (another Hidden City! Gondolin, this is Braavos, Braavos, this is Gondolin…). The Valar are of course the angelic beings whom Eru entrusted with protecting and ruling over Arda.  Men often mistook them for gods. The second part, morghulis, is a reference to Minas Morgul, the Tower of Dark Sorcery, the seat of the Ringwraiths. I’ll have more to say about this place later on. By the way, the dragon of princess Jaehaera Targaryen was named Morghul.

In A Storm of Swords, when refugees from the Mole’s Town (sacked by the Thenns) arrive at Castle Black, Jon Snow is introduced to ‘Lady Meliana (who was no lady, all her friends agreed)’. It seems that GRRM has borrowed this name from The Silmarillion, where Melian, as I have mentioned, was one of the Maiar, who fell in love with Elven king Thingol and bore him a daughter, Luthien. In Sindarin, the tongue of the Grey Elves, Melian means ‘dear gift’ (from mel, love, and anna, gift). This name is related to mellon, which means ‘friend’, and is now famous for being the answer to the riddle written on the Door of Durin. On archivolt the following words were written: ‘Speak, friend, and enter’. Gandalf realised that the password is supposed to be a wordplay, and simply spoke the Sindarin word for ‘friend’ in front of the gate. Possibly, this was GRRM’s inspiration when he came up with ‘Melony’, which seems to be Lady Melisandre’s original name. Or it’s just a form of Melanie. Since I’m an author myself, names always fascinated me, so please forgive me for going on all those tangents if you don’t find etymology that interesting.

Another Tolkienic name that found its way into ASOIAF is Daeron, the name of two Targaryen kings, four princes, one member of House Velaryon and Dornish Lord Vaith of the Red Dunes. But the Westerosi ‘Daeron’ who is the most similar to his Middle-earth counterpart doesn’t bear the name ‘Daeron’, but its (as it seems) variant, Dareon. Dareon was a singer forced to join the Night’s Watch, who later accompanied Samwell Tarly and maester Aemon on their voyage to Braavos. Properly, the ‘original’ Daeron was a minstrel who lived at the royal court in Doriath. He fell in love with king Thingol’s daughter Luthien, but she chose a mortal man, Beren, instead. Furious, Daeron told Thingol about their affair and ultimately unintentionally caused the great Quest for the Silmaril (which the king demanded in exchange for his daughter’s hand, in hopes that Beren will not survive).

Speaking of Beren and Luthien, it seems that GRRM in inserted some references to their story into Sansa Stark’s plotline. Firstly, there is this line from A Storm of Swords, where Gregor Clegane’s men share rumours about the Purple Wedding, Joffrey’s death and Sansa’s escape from King’s Landing with Sandor the Hound: ‘The northern girl. Winterfell’s daughter. We heard she killed the king with a spell, and afterward changed into a wolf with big leather wings like a bat, and flew out a tower window.’ In The Silmarillion, as Luthien and Beren are preparing to infiltrate Morgoth’s fortress of Angband, the elves princess skinchanges into a bat, while Beren assumes the shape of a monstrous wolf.

Beren became in all things like a werewolf to look upon, save that in his eyes there shone a spirit grim indeed but clean; and horror was in his glance as he saw upon his flank a bat-like creature clinging with creased wings. Then howling under the moon he leaped down the hill, and the bat wheeled and flittered above him.

I admit it might be a mere coincidence, but still, I decided to include this theory here as well, so you can judge for yourselves.

It’s possible, although unlikely, that the Hound himself was influenced by the tale of Beren and Luthien, and to be more precise: Huan, the Hound of the Valinor. This large wolfhound was given by one of the Valar, Oromë the Hunter, to Fëanor’s son Celegorm. Huan accompanied his master when the Noldor came to Beleriand, but seeing his cruelty and evil intentions towards Luthien, the Hound left Celegorm and helped her. Similarly, Sandor served Joffrey, but later deserted from his service. It’s interesting that the Hound of the Valar could speak, but only thrice in his lifetime… well, think what you will, but for me, a certain – supposedly – mute Gravedigger comes to mind.

Another ASOIAF bard, Marillion, is most likely named after The Silmarillion – or the band Marillion which was named after Tolkien’s book.

Now, if we page through the ASOIAF appendixes, we will find a cast of characters who seem to have moved to Westeros from Middle-earth.

In A Clash of Kings, when maester Luwin, Bran Stark and Ser Rodrik discuss the Hornwood succession crisis, certain Beren is mentioned as possible heir. His mother was Lady Berena of House Hornwood, wife of Leobald Tallhart. In The World of Ice and Fire, Berena Stark is present in the House Stark genealogical tree as daughter of Lord Beron Stark and Lady Lorra Royce. It is quite likely that those names refer to Beren, the famous Edain hero from the First Age, most notable for taking part in the Quest for the Silmaril with Luthien. Similarly to House Stark, Beren has a connection with wolves and skinchanging, since during his infiltration of Angband, he wore a skin of one of Sauron’s werewolves. Later, he was mortally wounded by Morgoth’s own wolf, Carcharoth.

Interestingly, just like the Last Hero from Westerosi legends, Beren is associated with leading a group of 12 companions on some venture of great importance. Firstly, in his youth, after the Battle of the Sudden Flame ended the siege of Morgoth’s fortress, Beren was a member of his father Barahir’s group of warriors. In total, there were 13 men, just like in the Last Hero tale. For some time, they managed to survive in the highlands of their fallen country, unwilling to desert it, but finally, when Morgoth sent his chief lieutenant Sauron against them, one of Barahir’s companions was Gorlim, afterwards remembered as the Unhappy. Sauron, a master of shapeshifting and illusion, tricked him into believing that he held his wife captive. In order to save her, Gorlim revealed the location of Barahir’s hideout. All his men were slaughtered, save for Beren who happened to be away at the time. But when it came to rewarding the traitor, Sauron revealed that his wife was in fact long dead. Just as he had promised, the future Dark Lord reunited Gorlim with his wife, in death.

Later, during his famed Quest for Silmaril, Beren was joined by Finrod Felagund, the Noldor King of Nargothrond and his ten loyal men (the treacherous sons of Feanor, Celegorm and Curufin, persuaded the rest of his subjects to abandon their king, in hopes that he will die and they will be able to take the crown of Nargothrond for themselves). While this time Beren had only 11 companions, not 12 like the Last Hero, this part of the tale is nonetheless very similar to the Westerosi legend, since all but Beren died in Sauron’s dungeons at Tol-in-Gaurhoth. Luthien and the hound Huan managed to rescue Beren and defeat Sauron, so maybe the help the Last Hero received from the Children of the Forest (since Luthien was one of the Grey Elves, and very skilled in the art of enchantment) and his faithful dog (think of Huan, the Hound of Valinor) were inspired by this part of the story. If it turns out that the Last Hero’s ‘wolf’ was in fact a direwolf, the parallel is even more apparent, since it was said that Huan was as large as a horse.

The Children of the Forest are known as ‘those who sing the song of earth’, while the Elves of Arda are Quendi, Those Who Speak with Voices. If we tried to be more specific, the Elven tribe most similar to the Children are probably the Teleri, since the Green Elves and Silvan Elves were their descendants, just like the Grey Elves who lived in Menegroth, The Thousands Caves, just like the Children often live in caves or other subterranean places. The other name of the Teleri is ‘the Lindar’, which means Singers.

Beren and Daeron are not the only Tolkienic names we find in Westeros. In the Iron Islands chapter in The World of Ice and Fire certain priest of the Drowned God named Sauron Salt-Tongue appears. Another priest and prophet, Galon Whitestaff, might be a nod to Gandalf, whose name means ‘the elf of the wand’, and who bore the epithet ‘the White’ following his return after his duel with a Balrog, who somehow managed to survive Morgoth’s fall in the First Age.

The pious knight Ser Theodan Wells who serves as Commander of the Warrior’s Sons, re-created by the High Sparrow, is probably named after King Théoden of Rohan. The Rohirrim, known as the horselords, might have their Essosi counterpart in the Dothraki. The last place where we could possibly accept someone as violent as Khal Drogo is probably the peaceful land of the Shire. Still, Frodo’s father, Drogo Baggins, lived at that very place. It is worth to mention that ‘Drogo’ is a real-world name as well (its variants are Drogon and Drogone). Rohanne Webber, Rohanne Tarbeck and Rohanne of Tyrosh might be named after Rohan, the realm of Rohirrim (from Sindarin ‘roch’, horse).

In The Sword Sword, when Ser Eustace Osgrey reminisces how powerful his House once was, he mention several places that sound as if they were taken from the Shire: Brandybottom (Brandy Hall and the river Brandywine, by the way, Honeywine which flows through Oldtown might be a play on this Tolkienic river) and Derring Downs (the Far Downs and the White Downs in Shire).

The surname of Ser Jacelyn Bywater, whom Tyrion named the Commander of the City Watch of King’s Landing might be a reference to Bywater in Shire, where the final skirmish of the War of the Ring took place. After all GRRM said that he liked the Scouring of the Shire.

House Lightfoot of the North might be a nod to those short fellows with hairy feet as well, since among hobbit families mentioned in LOTR’s Appendix C (hobbit family trees) we find The Lightfoots (Lightfeet!).

The title of Lord Selwyn Tarth, the Evenstar, might have been given in honour of Arwen who was known as The Evenstar. To support this theory, I’ll mention that while Tarth was known as the Sapphire Isle, Arwen’s father Elrond wore the one of the Three Elven Rings of Power, Vilya… also known as the Blue Ring, or the Ring of Sapphire…

Lady Arwyn Oakheart, Ser Arys Oakheart’s mother, is most likely named after Arwen as well, just like Arwyn Frey and Arwen Upcliff, while Elron of the Night’s Watch is probably a reference to her father.

When we hear about the ‘Scouring of Lorath’ we should probably hearken back to the Scouring of the Shire (which GRRM liked in the books, and missed in the movies). And if you remember that when he was first reading LOTR, ‘By the time we got to Weathertop, Tolkien had’ him, we shouldn’t be surprised when Melisandre warns Jon against ‘the knives in the dark’. A Knife in the Dark is the title of the chapter where Aragorn and the hobbits defend Amon Sûl against the Ring-wraiths.

The Battle of Three Armies, fought between the combined forces of House Lannister and House Durrandon against the Gardener kings, might be a play on the Battle of Five Armies from The Hobbit, just like the Battle of Six Kings mentioned in The World of Ice and Fire.

King Urras Ironfoot of the Iron Islands is probably named after Dain II Ironfoot, also from The Hobbit. Thoren Smallwood of the Night’s Watch might be a reference to Thorin II Oakenshield (after all, the seat of House Smallwood is Acorn Hall). I imagine that both Westerosi Oakenshields – the abandoned castle by the Wall and one of the Shield Islands – are nods to the famous dwarven king as well. When we read those lines in A Clash of Kings:

Jon heard a rustling from the red leaves above.  Two branches parted, and he glimpsed a little man moving from limb to limb as easily as a squirrel.  Bedwyck stood no more than five feet tall, but the grey streak in his hair showed his age. The other rangers called him giant.

we probably should think about this scene from The Hobbit which takes place during the Company’s voyage through seemingly endless Mirkwood:

‘Is there no end to this accursed forest?’ said Thorin. ‘Somebody must climb a tree and see if he can get his head above the roof and have a look around. The only way is to choose the tallest tree that overhangs the path.

Of course ‘somebody’ meant Bilbo.

Just like Bilbo, Bedwyck is very short. And in that ACoK fragment, it is actually Thoren Smallwood who stands under that weirwood with Jon and listens to Bedwyck’s report.

Durran, the mythical founder of House Durrandon might be another nod towards Tolkien’s dwarves, and to be more precise: to Durin, called the Deathless, the very first Dwarf. According to legends, king Durran reigned for a millenium. When we read in The World of Ice and Fire that maesters question this story:

Such a life span seems most unlikely, even for a hero married to the daughter of two gods. Archmaester Glaive, himself a stormlander by birth, once suggested that this King of a Thousand Years was in truth a succession of monarchs all bearing the same name, which seems plausible but must forever remain unproved.

… we should probably be reminded that Dwarves believed that King Durin will reincarnate and return to lead his people seven times. And indeed, in the Fourth Age, a king named Durin (the Seventh of His Name) led Durin’s folk back to their ancient kingdom, Khazad-dûm, more commonly known as Moria.

Durran VII ‘the Ravenfriend’ is interesting as well, since the Dwarves of Erebor (the kingdom under the Lonely Mountain from The Hobbit) were famous for their friendship with intelligent Ravens of Ravenhill, who could talk and brought them news. It was one of them, named Roäc, who served as Thorin’s messenger to his cousin Dain during the Siege of Erebor.

If we look at the map of the North from ASOIAF, we can see ‘the Long Like’. I admit it might be mere coincidence, but a lake of the same name exists in Middle-earth. Esgaroth, the Lake-town, was built upon it.

Of all Westerosi towns, the Planky Town is Dorne is perhaps the most similar to Esgaroth. From The World of Ice and Fire:

The Planky Town at the mouth of the river Greenblood is mayhaps the nearest thing the Dornish have to a true city, though a city with planks instead of streets, where the houses and halls and shops are made from poleboats, barges, and merchant ships, lashed together with hempen rope and floating on the tide.

Therefore, we probably shouldn’t be surprised that it was burned when we hear that:

Queen Rhaenys led the first assault on Dorne, moving swiftly to seize Dornish seats as she approached Sunspear and burning the Planky Town on Meraxes.

After all, the Lake-town was reduced to ashes by Smaug…

When I mentioned ‘metatextual jokes’, I was thinking about things like this scene where Tyrion remembers that:

The eyes were where a dragon was most vulnerable. The eyes, and the brain behind them. Not the underbelly, as certain old tales would have it. The scales there were just as tough as those along a dragon’s back and flanks. And not down the gullet either. That was madness. These would-be dragonslayers might as well try to quench a fire with a spear thrust. “Death comes out of the dragon’s mouth,” Septon Barth had written in his Unnatural History, “but death does not go in that way.” [A Dance with Dragons, Tyrion XI]

It seems that GRRM references The Hobbit here, where Bard the Bowman managed to kill Smaug by shooting an arrow into hole in his ‘scale armour’ located on his underbelly.

The Mountains of the Moon might have been influenced by The Grateful Dead song… or the legendary mountain range where – according to ancient Greek cartographers – the River Nile had its springs… but it is also possible that they were inspired by The Mountains of the Moon from… surprise, surprise, Tolkien…

The Road Goes Ever On, also known as ‘the walking song’ from The Hobbit contains the following stanza:

Roads go ever ever on,
Over rock and under tree,
By caves where never sun has shone,
By streams that never find the sea;
Over snow by winter sown,
And through the merry flowers of June,
Over grass and over stone,
And under mountains of the moon.

By the way, I really recommend a beautiful rendition of this amazing Tolkienic poem by Clamavi de Profundis (their versions of other J.R.R.T. songs are also great, especially of The Song of Durin, The Lament for Boromir and The Ents’ Marching Song). WE COME, WE COME, WITH HORN AND DRUM! TO ISENGARD, TO ISENGAAARD!

Hearken back, if you will, to the section where I discussed GRRM’s approach to Tolkien. It seems that Boromir is one of his favourite characters. Therefore, it’s a small wonder that he simply couldn’t miss any opportunity to pay some homage to the Son of Denethor.

Lord Hoster Tully’s funeral shares many similarities with Boromir’s. (I’ll use burnt orange to highlight ASOS fragments and blue for LOTR). Both scenes begin with similar sentences: They laid Lord Hoster in a slender wooden boat’ and Now they laid Boromir in the middle of the boat’. Then, in both cases, follows a description of the late man’s armament and clothing: His cloak was spread beneath him, rippling blue and red’  versus The grey hood and elven-cloak they folded and placed beneath his head’. Lord Hoster’s helmet, sword and horn are placed in his funeral boat: A trout, scaled in silver and bronze, crowned the crest of the greathelm they placed beside his head. On his chest they placed a painted wooden sword, his fingers curled about its hilt’, and later: His massive oak-and-iron shield was set by his left side, his hunting horn to his right.’, in LOTR, Boromir is equipped with the same objects: ‘His helm they set beside him, and across his lap they laid the cloven horn and the hilts and shards of his sword; beneath his feet they put the swords of his enemies’. Then the boats are set loose: The seven launched Lord Hoster from the water stair, wading down the steps as the portcullis was winched upward’ andSorrowfully they cast loose the funeral boat: there Boromir lay, restful, peaceful, gliding upon the bosom of the flowing water’. But while Hoster’s boat sails ‘into the rising sun’, for Boromir awaits only ‘the Great Sea at night under the stars’.

Well, another difference is that Boromir’s boat managed to survive the Rauros Falls and sailed upon the Great River Anduin past Osgiliath, and was spotted by his brother Faramir… but Hoster’s ‘last ship’ was set aflame.  And since we’re on topic of burning ships and boats…

In ASOIAF, we are told about two incidents of massive fleets set afire – Brandon, appropriately named ‘the Burner’, burned his all northern ships in grief after his father Brandon the Shipwright was lost at sea. Queen Nymeria set the famed ‘Ten Thousand Ships’ ablaze upon arriving in Dorne, claiming that ‘Our wanderings are at an end,” she declared. “We have found a new home, and here we shall live and die’. The act is most likely a reference to Fëanor who burned the stolen Teleri swan-ships – by the way, in ASOIAF similar vessels exist, and I’m of course talking about the swan ships of the Summer Isles. But the words, it seems, are based on the speech of Elendil, given upon his landing in Middle-earth after fleeing from lost Númenor: “Et Eärello Endorenna utúlien. Sinome maruvan ar Hildinyar tenn’ Ambar-metta” – Out of the Great Sea to Middle-earth (Endor is Quenya for ME) I am come. In this place will I abide, and my heirs, unto the ending of the world. I should probably mention that Tolkien’s ship-burning was probably inspired by the Tuatha Dé Danann, The Folk of the Goddess Danu, burnt their fleet upon arriving in Ireland, as a sign that they had no intention of retreating. With all those common influences, it’s really hard to tell who was inspired by whom.

Ah, that Fëanor, a Spirit of Fire indeed. In fact, his soul was so fiery, that upon his death, his material body was consumed by it. For me, it is impossible not to think about all those Targaryens shouting ‘I am the blood of the dragon, I am the fire made flesh’… Well, we lack any examples of self-combustion from them, but we are told that it was a custom among The Blood of the Dragon to cremate their dead… Aerys II, the Mad King, intended to turn the entire city of King’s Landing into his funeral pyre (hmm, crazed ruled who wants to burn when all hope is lost… say hello to Denethor II, the last Ruling Steward of Gondor). I should probably mention that Denethor has some similarities with Tywin – both lost their beloved wives – Joanna and Finduilas – and became bitter and cruel, especially towards their children. But I think that with Denethor, the Aerys parallels are more apparent than some vague similarity to Tywin. When Jaime kills Aerys, I think that we’re actually seeing GRRM’s opinion on the problem of honor, loyalty and ‘doing what is right’, his answer to Beregond fighting Denethor’s henchmen to save Faramir. While Jaime was one of the Kingsguard, the white knights, Beregond became a member of Faramir’s ‘White Guard’.

Well, that’s a topic for another day. Right now I’ll just mention that for me, the ASOIAF counterpart of Fëanor’s fiery death is Aerion’s drinking of wildfire, with grievous results.

But above all else, The Spirit of Fire is famous for being the greatest artisan and smith of Arda. The Mythical Astronomy fan inside me can’t help but notice some similarities to Azor Ahai, another famous smith. Or at least the Azor Ahai as he was according to LML’s grand theory. I think that most of you are familiar with his claim, supported by loads of evidence, that Azor Ahai and the Bloodstone Emperor were in fact the same person, and that Azor Ahai was in fact the villain of the Long Night story, the one to cause it by killing Nissa Nissa. The astronomical interpretation of this myth is as follows: Azor Ahai is the sun, the comet his sword Lightbringer and Nissa Nissa is the second moon mentioned in the Qartheen legend. Azor Ahai ‘broke’ the moon, and a rain of lunar ‘dragon’ meteors followed, striking ‘Planetos’ and causing the Long Night… in another essay LML explains why Nissa Nissa symbolises a weirwood tree evil Azor Ahai’s consciousness enters as well…

Think about how well this fits with this theory about The Silmarillion influences… the great darkness that fell upon the world was caused by Morgoth, the Dark Lord, who pierced the Two Trees of Valinor (from Mythical Astronomy perspective they can substitute for the Sun and the Moon, since those celestial bodies were created from their fruit and flower) with his black spear. The spear would be the comet. In fact, when GRRM writes about ‘The Long Night’ he’s using the same term Tolkien used:

When the darkness over Valinor ends with the creation of the Sun and the Moon, it is written that:

Still therefore, after the Long Night, the light of Valinor was greater and fairer than upon Middle-earth; for the Sun rested there, and the lights of heaven drew nearer to Earth in that region. But neither the Sun nor the Moon can recall the light that was of old, that came from the Trees before they were touched by the poison of Ungoliant That light lives now in the Silmarils alone.

The Qartheen legend Daenerys heard has its equivalent in The Silmarillion as well. Dany is told by her handmaiden Doreah that  “Once there were two moons in the sky, but one wandered too close to the sun and cracked from the heat.  A thousand thousand dragons poured forth, and drank the fire of the sun. That is why dragons breathe flame.  One day the other moon will kiss the sun too, and then it will crack and the dragons will return.”

When the Valar saw that the Two Trees can’t be saved, they took the last flower of Telperion, the Silver Tree and the final fruit of Laurelin, the Golden Tree. The flower became Isil, the Moon, while the fruit was turned into Anar, the Sun. Then they were placed in the sky. But the Valar feared that Morgoth will assault them, so they chose two of the Maiar to guide and protect the Sun and the Moon. Tilion became the steersman of Isil, while Arien (a fire spirit, akin to the Balrogs but not corrupted by Morgoth) was to defend the Sun.

But Tilion was wayward and uncertain in speed, and held not to his appointed path; and he sought to come near to Arien, being drawn by her splendour, though the flame of Anar scorched him, and the island of the Moon was darkened.

Hmm, the Moon wanders too close to the Sun and is scorched… I heard that tale before…

Anyway, it seems that when we look at Azor Ahai, we’re supposed to see not only Morgoth, but also Fëanor. After all they’re quite similar: Melkor was the greatest of the Ainur but fell because he desired power to create the world and beings he wanted, while Fëanor became obsessed with his own creations. That’s a theme of sub-creators trying to become gods in their own right and usurp the Creator, Eru, common in Tolkien’s writings. From Mythical Astronomy perspective (if you don’t know what I’m talking about, you probably should check out LML’s great essays), Azor Ahai plays the Fëanorian role of power obsessed individual willing to do anything to achieve his goals (the Oath and Kinslaying). His wife Nerdanel would be Nissa Nissa (while Fëanor doesn’t kill her, he takes all her sons from her and causes their deaths with his Oath, breaking her heart). Interestingly, just like LML’s ‘Nissa Nissa as weirwood goddess’, Nerdanel had red hair. Her father Mahtan was a great smith, and it was thanks to the knowledge he obtained from him that Fëanor was able to craft the weapons for the Noldor. It is said that after he had heard about the Kinslaying at Swanhaven, Mahtan regretted teaching Fëanor.

If Nissa Nissa was one of the Children of the Forest, or simply came from different tribe than Azor Ahai, and thanks to his marriage with her he was able to gain some knowledge he used to bring the Long Night, or commit some other foul deed, we might have another parallel. Since the seven knights of the Kingsguard serve to symbolise the Others in multiple scenes, and LML suggests that the first others were created by the Night’s King and his Queen (possibly the same people as Azor Ahai and Nissa Nissa), it’s possible that the Seven Sons of Fëanor bound by the terrible Oath were GRRM’s inspiration. After all, the eldest of this group, Maedhros, is quite similar to Jaime Lannister, who also lost his swordhand. But unlike Jaime, Maedhros learned how to fight with his left hand.

Well, let’s leave this topic open for some other episode.

By the way, the Noldor city in Valinor was named ‘Tirion’. I think that GRRM’s Tyrion comes from Welsh word for ‘happy’, but still, it’s a cool connection.

It seems that GRRM inserts Tolkien references even into his ‘historical’ novellas, such as The Sons of the Dragon. When we read that people of King’s Landing suspected that King Maegor Targaryen’s wife, the mistress of whisperers Tyanna of the Tower, used rats and ‘other vermin’ as her spies, we should probably think about Queen Berúthiel who owned 10 cats. Nine of them were black and spied on the people of Gondor. The tenth cat was white, and she would send him to spy on the others.

I mentioned that GRRM named one of his dragons ‘Morghul’, in reference to Minas Morgul, but it seems that he’s not the only one inspired by Tolkien’s dragons. Balerion the Black Dread, the greatest of all Targaryen dragons, whose rider was Aegon the Conqueror himself, has its Middle-earth counterpart in Ancalagon the Black, the largest of all winged dragons. He was slain by Eärendil himself, and upon his fall the three volcanic peaks of Thangorodrim, under which Morgoth’s fortress Angband was located, were shattered.

I said that ASOIAF references to Gondor will be explored in that huge section about  Númenor and its successor states, but there is this certain (possible) reference that doesn’t really fit there, since I’ll be talking about Gondor’s early history – Isildur, Anarion, Elendil and so on.

Eldacar was the 21st king of Gondor. His father was Valacar, the previous king of the blood of Númenor. But his mother was Vidumavi, daughter of the King of Rhovanion (a realm of the Northmen). There were some nobles in Gondor who viewed this marriage as unacceptable, and refused to serve a king who was not of a ‘pure blood’ Númenorean. Their leader, Castamir, who was late king Valacar’s distant relative, usurped the throne and Eldacar was forced to flee. But later, he gathered an army of loyalists and men of Rhovanion. Castamir was killed in battle, but his sons managed to flee to the port city of Umbar. Thus began the threat of the Corsair of Umbar Gondor had to endure for centuries. For my ears ‘Castamir’ sounds quite similar to ‘Castamere’, which was the seat of House Reyne, which tried to usurp the rule over the Westerland from House Lannister, just like Castamir usurped the throne of Gondor.

The Black Gate of the Nightfort has its Middle-earth counterpart in Morannon, the Black Gate of Mordor. The creepy weirwood mouth, meanwhile, reminds me of Sauron’s messenger who ‘negotiated’ with Aragorn and Gandalf, who introduced himself only as ‘The Mouth of Sauron the Great’. The part where Sam has to recite the Night’s Watch oath in order to pass might be based on Gandalf’s attempt to answer the riddle written on the Doors of Durin and enter into Moria… After all, the Black Gate is a passage through the Wall, while the Doors of Durin were built into the rocky western cliffs of the Misty Mountains, known as the Walls of Moria.

Euron Greyjoy’s personal sigil – a red eye with a black pupil, beneath a black iron crown supported by two crows – is quote easy to decode as ‘the Eye of Sauron, shining with malice’, while in Tolkien’s writings, The Iron Crown is often used as metaphor to refer to Dark Lords and their servants, and in general, to the concept of Evil.

GRRM said that he almost gave up reading The Fellowship of the Ring where he reached the part with Tom Bombadil, and that he did not miss that character absent from the Peter Jackson movie, so you might be a bit surprised when I tell you that I believe that certain ASOIAF character is ‘inspired’ by Bombadillo. According to my theory, Coldhands, the mysterious Night’s Watch ranger who saves Sam Tarly and Gilly from wights and later serves as Bran Stark’s guide in the Haunted Forest, is in fact GRRM’s ‘answer’ to Tom Bombadil, the jolly fellow from LOTR. Just like Tom, who rescues Frodo, Sam, Merry and Pippin from the nefarious Barrow-wight, Coldhands saves another Sam, who already has much in common with Gamgee. Both play the archetypal ‘guardian of the woods’ role, but while Tom protect the beautiful forest of spring and summer (his song omits winter: ‘O spring-time and summer-time, and spring again after!’), Coldhands, just like Herne the Hunter, wanders alone in the forest of winter and night. Garth the Green is GRRM’s merry (although sometimes dark) fertility god or spirit. But in the cold dead wastes Beyond the Wall, there is no place for Tom Bombadil – but there is for Coldhands. It seems that he, just like Tom, is ancient beyond measure and human memory, both know rhymes and chants in tongues unknown to their companions.

Tom lives in the Old Forest, among ‘malicious trees’, like Old Man Willow who attempts to crush Merry and Pippin. Coldhands lives in the Haunted Forest, and in first scene appears next to a weirwood at Whitetree (while Tom first appears in the Old Man Willow scene). When the hobbits arrive at the borders of the Bree-land and ask Tom to accompany them to The Prancing Pony inn, he’s unwilling to leave his little realm: ‘Tom’s country ends here: he will not pass the borders‘. In ASOIAF, it appears that Coldhands is unable to pass to the southern side of the Wall. Coldhands lives ‘Beyond the Wall’, while Tom’s homestead is located in the Old Forest, ‘Beyond the Hedge’. The Hedge also known as the High Hay, was planted by the Hobbits of Buckland, who lived close to the Forest, in order to protect them from the malicious trees. The following passage:

In fact long ago they attacked the Hedge: they came and planted themselves right by it, and leaned over it. But the hobbits came and cut down hundreds of trees, and made a great bonfire in the Forest, and burned all the ground in a long strip east of the Hedge. After that the trees gave up the attack, but they became very unfriendly. There is still a wide bare space not far inside where the bonfire was made.

reminds me of how the men of the Night’s Watch ‘permitted the forest to come no closer than half a mile of the north face of the Wall. The thickets of ironwood and sentinel and oak that had once grown there had been harvested centuries ago, to create a broad swath of open ground through which no enemy could hope to pass unseen’ (AGoT, Tyrion III).

The Barrowlands of the North almost certainly were heavily influenced by Tolkien’s Barrow-downs, located to the east of the Shire and the Old Forest. This ancient necropolis was first used by the ancestors of the Edain in the First Age, who buried their dead in megalithic mounds and barrows. Much later, when the Dúnedain returned from Númenor, they recognized those barrows as the hallowed tombs of their ancestors, and began to bury their own notable warriors and royalty there. When Arnor, the northern Dúnedain kingdom (with Gondor being the southern realm) was divided into three kingdoms, the Barrow-downs served as capital of Cardolan. This was the location of their final stand against the Witch-king, Lord of Angmar and one of the Ring-wraiths. The Lord of the Nazgûl sent the barrow-wights to haunt this region, and it was one of those evil spirits who captured Frodo and his companions in the Third Age, and held them in his barrow until Tom Bombadil arrived to free them. It’s possible that those Tolkienic wights were GRRM’s inspiration while creating his own wights.

The chant of the Barrow-wight is interesting, since it might have been the basis for Coldhands’ name:

Cold be hand and heart and bone, and cold be sleep under stone:
never more to wake on stony bed, never, till the Sun fails and the Moon is dead.
In the black wind the stars shall die, and still on gold here let them lie,
till the dark lord lifts his hand, over dead sea and withered land.

GRRM’s Patchface shares some similarities with Tom Bombadil as well, since both sing rhymes that seem to be nonsense, but might have some hidden deeper meaning. Will Coldhands’ origins remain forever a mystery, just like Tom’s?

Many fans compare the valyrian steel to Tolkien’s mithril, known as ‘true-silver, a metal rare and precious, found only in Khazad-dûm (Moria) and on the isle of Númenor. It is said to be stronger than steel, yet lighter. But as far as I know, there were no mithril swords. The swords and daggers ‘of Westernesse’ (Númenor) Frodo and his friends find in the the barrow have similar properties, though, just like the Elven swords, such as Glamdring (Gandalf’s blade) and Orcrist (belonging to Thorin). But of all Middle-earth weapons, the two swords which remind me of ASOIAF the most are Anguirel and Anglachel, forged by the Eöl, called the Dark Elf, from ‘iron that fell from heaven as a blazing star’. LML proposes that Azor Ahai’s Lightbringer, and possibly the sword of the Daynes, Dawn, are meteoric in origin.

Anglachel, The Flaming Iron, was stolen from Eöl by his son Maeglin (that’s something all fans of the ‘Gerold the Darkstar will steal Dawn from Starfall’ should ponder about), but Anguirel (The Iron of the Eternal Star) was given to king Thingol of Doriath. Later, it was given to Beleg, Thingol’s captain, as he was sent on a mission to find the king’s lost ward, Túrin. The sword came into Túrin’s possession when he accidentally killed his friend Beleg, taking him for one of the orcs who held him captive, when the elven warrior sneaked into their camp to free Túrin. Upon his arrival in Nargothrond, he had the blade reforged, and renamed it Gurthang, the Iron of Death. And ‘though ever black its edges shone with pale’. Wielding this sword, Túrin, now called Mormegil (which means Blacksword), committed many heroic deeds, but also many evil, since the terrible fate and Morgoth’s curse on the House of Húrin (which reminds be of ‘Qhorin’, by the way) were ever present in his life. (In ASOIAF, ‘Blacksword’ was the epithet of Lord Barthogan ‘Barth’ Stark). Mormegil used Gurthang to slay Glaurung, the father of dragons, but not before the evil spirit inhabiting the beast could reveal that Túrin’s beloved wife, Níniel, was in fact his lost sister Nienor. Then he used the black blade to end his life. When his friends came to burn him on a pyre, they saw that the sword was broken.

Two swords forged from the same black metal might remind us of Oathkeeper and Widow’s Wail, the two blades created from Ned Stark’s destroyed blade, Ice (which LML likes to call ‘Black Ice’). If you’re familiar with The Mythical Astronomy ideas about Azor Ahai’s Lightbringer was black meteoric sword, some similarities to Gurthand become apparent. Lightbringer supposedly drank the blood and soul of Nissa Nissa (think of Nienor Níniel), while Gurthang appeared to be sentient, at least from Túrin’s point of view. Keep in mind that Túrin was overtaken by grief at that moment, and maybe even mad.  Also, The Silmarillion, just like LOTR exist ‘in universe’ as fragments of The Red Book of Westmarch, containing Bilbo’s and Frodo’s texts and translations of older manuscripts. Since no one was present when Túrin died, it’s likely that his dialogue with Gurthang was added by some minstrel.

‘Hail Gurthang! No lord or loyalty dost thou know, save the hand that wieldeth thee. From no blood wuk thou shrink. Wilt thou therefore take Túrin Turambar, wilt thou slay me swiftly’ says Mormegil, and the blade answers: ‘Yea, I will drink thy blood gladly, that so I may forget the blood of Beleg my master, and the blood of Brandir slain unjustly. I will slay thee swiftly’.

But as I said, we will return to the tragic story of the Children of Húrin in another episode.

In his essay The Stark That Brings the Dawn , which contains section based on my Tolkienic research and theories I fully present here for the first time, LML notes that Gurthang and its twin are similar to the swords Tywin has forged from Ned’s Ice, but also to Blackfyre and Dark Sister, and most importantly, to Lightbringer itself.

Maeglin,  who was later remembered as the traitor who revealed the location of king Turgon’s Hidden City of Gondolin to Morgoth, fled from his father with his mother Aredhel. Once, while traveling to visit her kinsmen, the Sons of Fëanor, Aredhel was lost in the woods of Nan Elmoth, where Eöl lived. He took her for wife, and they had a son, Maeglin. Eöl, who hated the Noldor and blamed them for Morgoth’s return to the Middle-earth from Valinor, forbade her to visit her Noldor family. But when Maeglin was old enough, Ardhel took him and fled. Eöl chased them, and thus found out where Gondolin was located. King Turgon had him brought before his throne, where he demanded that at least his son returns with him to Nan Elmoth. When Maeglin refused, the Dark Elf tried to hit him with a dart, but Aredhel moved to cover her son and was wounded instead. It turned out that the javelin was poisoned, and the princess could not be saved. King Turgon, her brother, was furious, and hed Eöl cast down from the walls of Gondolin, into the precipice of Caragdûr below. Before his death, the Dark Elf cursed his son, and prophesied that he will meet the same fate.

I missed this, but LML noted that this is quite similar to the story of King Maegor the Cruel and Queen Rhaena, who was forced to marry him, but later fled and stole the royal sword Blackfyre for her sons Jaehaerys (later remembered as Jaehaerys the Conciliator). Once again, thanks to LML for including that Tolkienic material in his essay.

Since we’re discussing swords, I’ll point out that another Tolkienic blade shares some similarities with Ringil, the blade of Fingolfin, the High King of the Noldor.

Hearken back to the summary of The Silmarillion I provided, where the great battle of Bragollach, the Sudden Flame, was mentioned. At the very beginning of that chapter Fingolfin is called ‘The King of the North’ (The King in the North! The King in thaa Nordd!). Anyway, when the king sees that the battle is lost, grief overtakes him, and mounting his great warhorse Rochallor, he rides to the gates of Angband and challenges Morgoth to a duel. The Dark Lord doesn’t want to be viewed as coward by his captains and lieutenants (Fingolfin calls him ‘craven and lord of slaves’), so he agrees.

Morgoth comes, and the rumour of his feet is ‘like thunder’. He wears a black armour and when he stands next to the king, he looks like some iron-crowned tower. His great shield blazoned only with sable, casts a shadow like a stormcloud.

I don’t know about you, but for me this sounds like the description of Gregor Clegane before his duel with Oberyn, the Red Viper of Dorne.

The Elven King is short by comparison, but:

”Fingolfin gleamed beneath it as a star; for his mail was overlaid with silver, and his blue shield was set with crystals; and he drew his sword Ringil, that glittered like ice.”

Morgoth fights with Grond, the Hammer of the Underworld (thousands of years later, Sauron named the great battering ram that was to smash the Great Gate of Minas Tirith in its honour). It swings down like ‘a bolt of thunder’ and rents ‘mighty pits in the earth, whence smoke and fire darted’. But Fingolfin is fast and leaps away, just like ‘lightning shoots from under a dark cloud; and he wounded Morgoth with seven wounds, and seven times Morgoth gave a cry of anguish, whereat the hosts of Angband fell upon their faces in dismay, and the cries echoed in the Northlands’. Oh, the Hammer of Waters, and cry of anguish! Oh, the banners darling Sansa, the banners! What a day to be a Mythical Astronomy fan!

But at last, Fingolfin is too tired to recoil, and Morgoth crushed him with his shield. But thrice, the High King rises and fights on. His shield is broken, and his helmet stricken, but that’s not enough to stop the powerful Noldor. But then Fingolfin stumbles (the battlefield is now full of pits and holes) on the ground and Morgoth places his foot upon his neck. In his final desperate act, the High King cuts the foot with Ringil, but smoking black blood rushes forward and fills the pit. ‘Thus died Fingolfin, High King of the Noldor, the most valiant of the Elven-kings of old‘. But when Morgoth is about to throw his body to wolves, Thorondor, the King of Eagles, arrives, and mars the Dark Lord’s face with his mighty talons. Then he takes Fingolfin’s body and carries it away to Gondolin. There king Turgon buries his father. Interestingly, in ASOIAF, Jon Snow is wounded in his face by Orell’s eagle… but I don’t see why GRRM would create a parallel between his hero and Tolkien’s Dark Lord… unless it’s because Jon plays the archetypal role of Azor Ahai, and Azor Ahai was a ‘Dark Lord’, as LML suggests.

Now, the time has come for the last of those ‘minor’ references to Tolkien in ASOIAF. Of course, many more remain. But listing all of them isn’t our goal today. With all those parallels, I’m trying to make you confident that GRRM inserts many nods to Tolkien into his works. Some are quite easy to decode, while others harder. In the final section I’ll explore what I consider to be one of the most complex parallels between the Legendarium and A Song of Ice and Fire

Turns out that Westeros isn’t the only land plagued by long harsh winters.

During the Fell Winter of 2911/2912, Third Age, the river Brandywine froze, and White Wolves were able to enter Shire.  The Horn-call of Buckland was used to warn against their attack. After that, it was not heard for over a century – until the Ring-wraiths invaded Buckland in the year 3018. Fell winter, Winter fell… It’s interesting that Winterfylleth was the Old English name of October. Saint Bede (the Venerable) wrote that the word Wintirfylliþ came from ‘winter’ and ‘full moon’, as winter began on that month’s first full moon.

Another notable winter was the Long Winter of 2758/2759, Third Age. At that time, King Helm Hammerhand of Rohan was besieged by the Dunlendings in Hornburg (Helm’s Deep). Legends claim that Helm, clad in white, would leave the fortress alone and slay enemies with bare hands. Then he would blow his great horn, and his foes would tremble. But one day, his horn was heard, but no one returned to the fortress. When his men led a sortie, they found his body in the snow, still standing as if he was ready to fight. Men of Rohan say that Helm’s wraith still wanders in the land, blowing his horn. (This reminds me of the 79 sentinels of the Night’s Watch, and Mors Umber, who besieges Winterfell in A Dance of Dragons. Just like Helm, Mors wears white and blows a loud horn).

It was during that great winter that Gandalf first became fond of the hobbits, seeing their courage, endurance and willingness to help others in the hard famine times that followed.

And now… let’s return to the First Age Beleriand, where the situation seems hopeless. Gondolin, Doriath and Nargothrond have fallen, and Morgoth’s armies roam freely across the land. But the new High King of the Noldor, Ereinion Gil-galad managed to flee to the Isle of Balar with Círdan the Shipwright, and the survivors from the fallen kingdoms gathered in the Havens of Sirion, led by Elwing and Eärendil…

cropped-20160809_202853.jpg

The Baltic Sea, by BT


Part III: Oh, that land which the Eldar name Númenórë, lost for us for evermore

Westernesse

Eärendil saw that for the Elves and the Edain of Beleriand, there is no hope left. With some help from Círdan, he built the famous ship Vingilótë, the Flower of Foam. On this ship he sailed the Great Sea, in hopes of reaching Valinor, but his efforts were in vain. Elwing, meanwhile, remained at the Havens of Sirion with their twin sons, Elrond and Elros. When the surviving Sons of Fëanor found out that she held the Silmaril Beren and Luthien recovered from Angband years ago, they remembered their terrible Oath and attacked the Havens. Eärendil’s people were slaughtered, but when soldiers tried to capture Elwing, she cast herself into the sea. But one of the Valar, Ulmo (Lord of Waters), took pity on her, and changed her into a giant white bird. In this form, she flew over the waves and found her husband’s ship.

Four sons of Fëanor participated in this Third Kinslaying, but only two survived, Maedhros and Maglor. Elrond and Elros were captured, but Maglor decided to spare them and raised them himself.

When Eärendil  heard that his Havens were sacked and his sons were likely put to sword, he decided that he has nothing to lose. Although since the First Kinslaying the Noldor were banned from returning to Valinor, Eärendil and Elwing would sail there, and try to plead with the Valar to save Middle-earth. Thanks to the power of the Silmaril, they navigated the Great Sea safely, and landed on the shores of Valinor. Thus Eärendil stood before Manwë, the Elder King. Moved Eärendil and Elwing’s willingness to sacrifice their own lives for the good of all Elves of Beleriand and the Edain, the Valar decided not to punish them by death (and that was the punishment for breaking the Ban of the Valar). Their plea was heard, and it was decided that the Valar will deal with Morgoth once and for all. Since Eärendil had both Elves and Men among his ancestors (as he was the son of mortal man, Tuor, and princess Idril of Gondolin) and the same was true for Elwing (whose father was Dior, the son of Beren and Luthien), the Valar decided that they and children will be allowed to choose whether they want to be counted among the Elves, or if they prefer to be considered human. It is said that Eärendil was about to choose his father’s race, but for Elwing’s sake, he decided to accept the fate of the Elves. Much later, Elrond followed his parents’ choice, but his brother Elros chose the Edain.

Then the Valar dispatched a great host to Beleriand. The command of that army was given to Manwë’s herald and banner-bearer, Eönwë of the Maiar. It consisted of the Vanyar and those of the Noldor who never left Valinor. The War of Wrath began. In this fight the Edain fought as well, while other tribes allied with the Dark Lord. Ultimately, Morgoth’s armies were annihilated, his Balrogs destroyed (though at least one survived). Sauron fled with hew survivors. The dragonkind was decimated. Ancalagon, the greatest of all winged dragons, was killed by Eärendil himself, and his falling corpse shattered the peaks of Thangorodrim. Then Morgoth was captured and thrown through the Door of Night, into the Timeless Void, where he will remain until Dagor Dagorath, the Last Battle.

But so great was the fury of the warriors and Morgoth’s beasts that the land of Beleriand was shattered, and it sank, with the sea rushing insland.

The Valar took Eärendil’s ship Vingilótë and placed it among the stars. The Mariner became its steersman, with the Silmaril burning bright on his brow. The Star of Eärendil, as it was called, or Gil-estel, the Star of Hope, became Arda’s Evenstar and Morningstar, which Men know as Venus.

To finish up the story of the Silmarils, I will recount what happened to the two remaining jewels. When Morgoth was overthrown, the gems were recovered by the Army of the Valar, and placed under guard. But Maedhros and Maglor, though reluctantly, tried to fulfill their cursed Oath. They slew the guards and stole the Silmarils, but the hallowed jewels burned their hands. Then they realised that after all they had done, the gems rejected them as unworthy. Unable to bear the pain, Maedhros took the Silmaril and cast himself into a deep chasm. Maglor threw his gem into the sea and then – at least according to legend – wandered alone on the shores of Middle-earth for eons. This is the fate of the Silmarils: one ended up in the sky, one in the depths of the earth, and one in the sea.  There they will remain, at least until the end of Arda, when, as the Mandos foretold, Fëanor will return.

This is the origin of Arda’s ‘Venus’, for just like in our world, Morningstar and Evenstar are simply aspects of the same celestial body. While creating this story, Tolkien was inspired by the Anglo-Saxon Earendel, or Aurvandil, the luminous wanderer, identified as Venus. In LOTR, Bilbo sings a song about Eärendil, which ends with the line ‘Flammifer of Westernesse’… but what is that Westernesse?

Well, we finally arrived at our main topic today… Westernesse, Elenna… Númenor.

The Valar decided that the Edain, the Men who allied with Elvest against Morgoth during the Wars of Beleriand, should be rewarded. An island was brought from the depths of the sea, between Valinor and Middle-earth and given to the them. The Edain, led by Elros, built ships and sailed the Great Sea. The Star of Eärendil guided them. At that time, it was so bright that ‘no other star could stand beside it’, and was visible even at Morning. Thus the Edain arrived at Andor (The Land of the Gift), which they called Elenna (Starwards), and Anadûnê (Westernesse), which is Númenórë in Quenya, the High Elven tongue. There they founded a realm, and prospered, for the isle was fertile, fruitful and rich in gems and metals. Elros became the first king of the Númenoreans, also known as the Dúnedain, the Men of the West.

Their lifespans were, usually , three times longer than those of other men (but Elros’ descendants could live even longer, because of their Elven blood), but since the days of Elros, with each generation, the average lifespan grew shorter. The Elves bestowed many gifts upon them, for example a sapling of Celeborn, the tree of Tol Eressëa (which came from a seedling of Galathilion, the White Tree of Tirion, which in turn was made in the image of Telperion itself) which grew into Nimloth, the White Tree, from which the White Tree of Gondor descends.

Númenorean civilization became very advanced, especially in all fields related to seafaring and navigation, for example shipbuilding, map-drawing and astronomy. But at the same time, the Valar forbade them to sail to Valinor, for no mortals may set foot in the Undying Lands. So the Númenoreans turned to Middle-earth, and there they became known as The Sea-kings among the more primitive tribes. Some took them for gods. They brought knowledge of farming, sowing and grinding, and taught how to plant corn and wine, and how to shape stone and hew wood, and many other things that made their short lives easier.

But as the time passed, they began to desire Valinor, and eternal life, for they considered it unfair that the Valar and Elves live forever, while they must abandon all their works, and their marvellous isle, and venture into darkness and face the unknown. Before, they accepted death, understanding that in this way they will be reunited with Iluvatar. But now, they began searching for ways to prolong their lives. But the only thing they discovered was how to preserve bodies, so Númenor was filled with ‘great houses for the dead’. The living, meanwhile, turned to revelry and pleasures.

The sailors of Westernesse returned to the Middle-earth, but this time as conquerors, not teachers and healers. When Tar-Palantir, the 24th King of Númenor, died, his daughter Tar-Míriel was supposed to inherit the Sceptre. Female rulers were not unheard of in Númenor – Tar-Aldarion, the 6th king, decreed that absolute primogeniture was to be used to determine who should inherit the throne. Tar-Ancalimë was the first Ruling Queen, Tar-Telperiën the second and Tar-Vanimeldë the third.

But the late king’s nephew took her to wife, against the custom, and became Ar-Pharazôn (The Golden). In the beginning kings of Númenor used names in Quenya, but later began using only in the Adûnaic tongue, as they opposed the Valar and Elves were their allies. His name in Quenya would be Tar-Calion, The Son of Light.

When Ar-Pharazôn heard that Sauron arose in the Middle-earth, and claimed the title of ‘The King of Men’, the king was furious. The heir of Elros would not be thus insulted, so he assembled a great army and landed in Umbar. Then the royal host marched to Mordor. And Sauron came, alone, and humbled himself before the king. Ar-Pharazôn was flattered, and decided that the Dark Lord should be taken to Númenor as a hostage. Of course, this was exactly what Sauron desired.

Before three years passed, Sauron sat on the royal council and ruled the isle in all but name. The remaining Elf-friends were persecuted. Sauron began teaching about Melkor, The Giver of Freedom, and claimed that the Valar made up ‘Eru’ to justify their rule of the world. Ar-Pharazôn and his ‘king’s men’ began worshipping Morgoth. A great temple was built in Armenelos, the royal capital. There Sauron burned the White Tree and later made human sacrifices.

Then Sauron convinced the king to break the Ban of the Valar and invade Valinor. The greatest fleet Arda has ever seen was built, and weapons and armours were forged for nine years. When all was prepared, boarded his might flagship and sailed towards Valinor.

Upon landing in the Blessed Realm, Ar-Pharazôn led his troops to the Elven city of Tirion, and all its inhabitants fled. Then the Valar asked Eru himself to intervene. And their prayer was answered.

A chasm opened in the earth and the proud king and all his mortal warriors became trapped in a cave deep underground, where Ar-Pharazôn will remain until the end of Arda. Their fleet fell into abyss which opened below them. The entire world was changed, so no mortal sailor may ever arrive at the Undying Lands, which were removed from the mortal world. Númenor was destroyed – a great rift opened below it, and it fell into darkness. Waves covered the place where it once was. But some say that the peak of Meneltarma, The Pillar of Heavens, a great mountain in the centre of the isle, remains visible to this day as lonely island in the Great Sea.

Númenor was lost. And men speak of it no more, but of Akallabêth, The Downfallen, or Atalantë in Quenya.

The world of A Song of Ice and Fire has its own lost advanced civilization, The Great Empire of the Dawn. For me, its similarities with Númenor are striking.  From The World of Ice and Fire: [After the first God-Emperor’s ascension to heaven]:

Dominion over mankind then passed to his eldest son, who was known as the Pearl Emperor and ruled for a thousand years. The Jade Emperor, the Tourmaline Emperor, the Onyx Emperor, the Topaz Emperor, and the Opal Emperor followed in turn, each reigning for centuries…yet every reign was shorter and more troubled than the one preceding it, for wild men and baleful beasts pressed at the borders of the Great Empire, lesser kings grew prideful and rebellious, and the common people gave themselves over to avarice, envy, lust, murder, incest, gluttony, and sloth.

When the daughter of the Opal Emperor succeeded him as the Amethyst Empress, her envious younger brother cast her down and slew her, proclaiming himself the Bloodstone Emperor and beginning a reign of terror.  He practiced dark arts, torture, and necromancy, enslaved his people, took a tiger woman for his bride, feasted on human flesh, and cast down the true Gods to worship a black stone that had fallen from the sky.  (Many scholars count the Bloodstone Emperor as the first High Priest of the sinister Church of Starry Wisdom, which persists to this day in many port cities throughout the known world).

In the annals of the further east, it was the Blood Betrayal, as his usurpation is named, that ushered in the age of darkness called the Long Night.  Despairing of the evil that had been unleashed on earth, the Maiden-Made-of-Light turned her back upon the world, and the Lion of Night came forth in all his wroth to punish the wickedness of men.  

The Bloodstone Emperor would be GRRM’s Ar-Pharazôn, while Amethyst Empress Tar-Míriel, the usurped Queen (Míriel means ‘Jewel Daughter’, and of course Opal and Amethyst are both precious gems). In both cases a woman is supposed to inherit the throne, but ambitious family member usurps the throne. If Amethyst Empress had silver hair, like Valyrians, we might have another parallel, since while Míriel’s hair colour is unknown, she was named after Míriel, Fëanor’s mother, who had silver hair.

First rulers of both realms live for centuries, but as time passes, the citizens have shorter lifespans. People of both kingdoms become wicked and reject the true gods (The Valar, but also Eru).  A necromancer ascends to the throne (well, it’s not an exact parallel, but nevertheless, in The Hobbit Sauron is called The Necromancer). I propose that GRRM merged Ar-Pharazôn with Sauron, to create the Bloodstone Emperor.

Both realms are connected with dawn and morning – Númenor was located on the Isle of Elenna, the Isle under the Star of Eärendil, which is both the Morningstar and the Evenstar. (If you want to lean more about Venus-related mythology, check out LML’s essay on this topic). In fact, Elenna was created in the shape of a five-pointed star, a common symbol for Venus in real-world mythology.

Unsurprisingly, both sons of Eärendil have Morningstar-related symbolism. It’s more apparent with Elros, who follows his father’s star and becomes the first king of Elenna, but Elrond has it as well. During the War of the Last Alliance, Elrond (whose name means ‘Dome of Stars’) served as banner-bearer and herald of Ereinion Gil-galad, the High King of the Noldor… Gil-galad means ‘Star of Bright Light/Great Radiance’, so for our purpose here, we can view him as a solar character, symbolising the Sun. Elrond was his herald, just like rising Morningstar heralds the coming of the Sun, as it’s visible in the eastern sky shortly before sunrise. This phenomena inspired many myth-makers, and it seems J.R.R. Tolkien was among them. After all, in the Anglo-Saxon poem from which the name ‘Earendel’ comes, the Morningstar (which symbolises, at least in Tolkien’s interpretation, St. John the Baptist) heralds the coming of the Sun (Christ).

If we look at the names of Westernesse’s kings, this Morningstar connection becomes even more apparent:

Tar-Anárion – Son of the Sun – Morningstar
Tar-Ancalimë – Radiance, The Most Bright – Venus is the brightest ‘star’ visible in the sky
Tar-Anducal – Lord of Light – who usurped the throne, just like the Morningstar ‘usurps’ the Sun shortly before dawn
Tar-Calmacil – The Sword of Light (Lightbringer?)
Ar-Gimilzôr – The Starflame – GRRM uses this title for one of his Dayne kings
Ar-Pharazôn/Tar-Calion – The Golden/Son of Light – many characters who seem to echo the original Bloodstone Emperor with their deeds have names connected with gold (like Auron, the self-proclaimed Emperor of Valyria, Euron or Aurane Waters, who parallels Ar-Pharazon as leader of a great fleet. Aurum means gold in Latin)

I think that by looking at all those similarities, we can assume that GRRM intended to make his Great Empire of the Dawn, his own Atlantean lost civilization, similar to Tolkien’s.

Therefore, I propose that: just like not all of the Dúnedain perished in the Downfall, some people of the Great Empire managed to survive, and settled in Westeros, and that the most likely candidates for those ‘lost’ Geo-Dawnians are the Daynes and the Hightwers, and that this whole scenario was inspired by Tolkien.

Now, many fans speculated that those Houses have very ancient origins and are rooted in the Great Empire, but I’m not aware of any analysis where the author looks at this theory from the Tolkienic point of view… and those connections and parallels are striking…

You see, not all Numenoreans turned to evil like the so-called king’s men (by the way, that’s a term GRRM uses in ASOIAF as well). Some still remained faithful to the Valar and their friendship with the Eldar. The most notable of those were: Elendil (Devoted to the Stars), who was a descendant of Elros, but from the female line, and his sons Isildur (Devoted to the Moon) and Anarion (The Son of the Sun). They were warned before the Downfall came, and managed to flee on nine ships with their families and retainers. Upon arriving in Middle-earth, they founded the realms of Gondor in the south and Arnor in the North.

After LML mentioned in his essay that the surname ‘Dayne’ might come from ‘Edain’, several people pointed out in the comments section that Tolkienic ‘Edain’ is pronounced differently than ‘Dayne’. Well, GRRM isn’t as strict about pronunciation as J.R.R.T. – so it’s possible that for him, ‘Edain’ is pronounced like ‘Dain Ironfoot’, and thus might be the basis for ‘Dayne’. But this Dayne-Edain phonetic connection wasn’t a part of my original thesis. I believe it was JoeMagician who first proposed that GRRM’s ‘Dayne’ comes from ‘Edain’.  I arrived at the conclusion that we’re supposed to view the Daynes as GRRM’s own personal Dúnedain independently, without considering the phonetic similarities or lack thereof.

Whatever the case, even without this connection there are numerous similarities between the two:

The Edain followed the Star of Eärendil to reach their new homeland, the isle of Elenna or Westernesse, Starwards. The Daynes followed the trace of a falling star to reach the place where they built the castle of Starfall. in Westeros… On an isle in the mouth of the river Torrentine.

Just like the Dúnedain, House Dayne has some Morningstar symbolism – their ancestral sword is called Dawn, and notable knights of the house bear the title of the Sword of the Morning.

In Gondor, we find the city of Osgiliath, which of old served as its capital. Its name can be translated as the Citadel of Stars or ‘Starry Host’. In Oldtown, the seat of House Hightower, we find both the ‘Starry Sept’ and The Citadel. The Great Hall of Osgiliath was known as the Dome of Stars, and it was built on the bridge spanning across the Great River Anduin. The Citadel’s domes and buildings located on both sides of the river Honeywine are connected with bridges.

The Citadel houses several glass candles, which are almost certainly based on Tolkienic palantíri, The Seeing Stones, created by Fëanor himself, and then given to the Dúnedain as gifts. They resembled orbs or spheres in shape, and appeared to be mader from black glass or crystal.  Is it just a coincidence that Osgiliath’s Dome housed one of those artifacts?

The Hightower, with its mysterious black stone foundations, might have its Tolkienic counterpart in Orthanc, the Tower of Isengard. At the time of the War of the Ring it was inhabited by Saruman, but it was actually built by the Dúnedain. It is described as ‘a thing not made by the craft of Men, but riven from the bones of the earth in the ancient torment of the hills. A peak and isle of rock it was, black and gleaming hard: four mighty piers of many-sided stone were welded into one’. The highway leading to the Great Gate of the Ring of Isengard was ‘paved with great flat stones, squared and laid with skill; no blade of grass was seen in any joint’. Isengard was ancient: ‘partly it was shaped in the making of the mountains, but might works the Men of Westernesse had wrought here of old’. Atop Orthanc, Saruman, and before him, men sent from Gondor, would watch the stars and the lands alike (as it was placed on Gondor’s border). When Gandalf and Theoden reach the foot of this great tower, it is noted that ‘It was black, and the rock gleamed as if it were wet’. In other words, just like at the Battle Isle of Oldtown, we have an ancient megalithic structure that is made of gleaming black stone.  From atop the Hightower, Lord Leyton watches stars and, at least according to rumours, studies magic. And while the Hightower itself doesn’t house any glass candles, at least as far as we know, the nearby Citadel does.

Another of the palantíri was housed at Minas Ithil, the Tower of the Moon, in the land of Ithilien – a province of Gondor just to the west of Mordor. It was built by Isildur, while his brother Anarion built Minas Anor, the Tower of the Sun, in Anorien, on the opposite side of the Great River Anduin. But the beautiful city of the Moon was sacked by the Witch-king, and became the seat of the Ring-wraiths. It was corrupted, and became Minas Morgul, the Tower of Dark Sorcery. In The Two Towers the following description is given:

All was dark about it, earth and sky, but it was lit with light. Not the imprisoned moonlight welling through the marble walls of Minas Ithil long ago, Tower of the Moon, fair and radiant in the hollow of the hills. Paler indeed than the moon ailing in some slow eclipse was the light of it now, wavering and blowing like a noisome exhalation of decay, a corpse-light, a light that illuminated nothing. In the walls and towers windows showed, like countless black holes looking inward into emptiness, but the topmost course of the tower revolved slowly, first one way and then another, a huge ghostly head leering into the night.

In defiance, Minas Anor was renamed Minas Tirith, the Tower of Guard.

Mythical Astronomy readers probably see why GRRM would name one of his dragons ‘Morghul’… because Minas Morgul is a prime corrupted moon symbol… and if LML is right, and I think he is, in ASOIAF ‘dragons’ symbolise the moon meteors, pieces of the second moon scorched and corrupted by the Lightbringer-comet impact.

Now, the Daynes are widely-known thanks to their ancestral sword, Dawn. If they are supposed to be ASOIAF-Dúnedain, then surely, the original Men of Westernesse should have some blade of similar properties… and indeed, they do. The following rhyme was written in Gondor about Elendil and his sons:

Tall ships and tall kings
Three times three,
What brought they from the foundered land
Over the flowing sea?
Seven stars and seven stones
And one white tree.

When Elendil and his sons fled from Elenna, they took several artifacts with them: seven of the palantíri, a sapling of the White Tree (which came from a fruit of Isildur took from the Tree of Númenor, before Sauron had it felled and burned)… and Narsil.

Narsil was the sword of Elendil himself, forged in the First Age by dwarven smith Telchar. In Quenya, its name means ‘red and white flame’, and it is supposed to symbolise the Sun and the Moon united against darkness. In one of his letter, J.R.R. Tolkien described ‘Narsil’ as pointing out to Anar and Isil as the ‘chief heavenly lights, as enemies of darkness’. During the War of the Last Alliance, King Gal-galad and Elendil were both killed by Sauron. Narsil broke, but Isildur picked up its shards, and cut the One Ring of Sauron’s hand. (By the way Narsilion – The Song of the Sun and the Moon – is a ballad detailing the creation of Isil and Anar by thr Valar).

As LML notes in his essay (The Great Empire of the Dayne section), GRRM references those events with a story Ygritte tells Jon Snow:

“Gorne,” said Jon. “Gorne was King-beyond-the-Wall.”

“Aye,” said Ygritte. “Together with his brother Gendel, three thousand years ago. They led a host o’ free folk through the caves, and the Watch was none the wiser. But when they come out, the wolves o’ Winterfell fell upon them.”

“There was a battle,” Jon recalled. “Gorne slew the King in the North, but his son picked up his banner and took the crown from his head, and cut down Gorne in turn.”

Isildur refused to destroy the Ring, claiming it as ‘weregild’ for his father and Anarion, who was hit by a rock thrown from besieged Barad-dûr, Sauron’s Dark Tower. Then he returned to Gondor, but after one year, decided to return to Arnor and assume his rightful place as its King. At that time, it seemed that with Sauron’s defeated and disappearance, all evil was banished from Middle-earth. So Isildur took only two hundred knights and bowmen as his escort. But as they were passing through the Gladden Fields, they were ambushed by orcs, who were left behind when Sauron’s main host was withdrawn back to Mordor years later. They hid in the mountains, and as the Allied forces marched east, they were left unnoticed. Now, not knowing that the war was over and their master gone, they decided to act. Isildur’s retinue was ambushed, and during the battle that ensued, his three sons were killed. When the king tried to escape, the One Ring betrayed him, and slipped of his finger. He was seen by orcs and slain with arrows. Of Isildur’s men only three survived:

Estelmo, the squire of Isildur’s son and heir Elendur, who was stunned but not slain, and was later found alive. The only other survivors were Isildur’s own squire, Ohtar, and his companion, who were ordered to flee with the shards of Narsil. They brought it to Rivendell, where it remained until the War of the Ring thousands of years later.

Now, it seems that this Disaster of the Gladden Fields is referenced in ASOIAF as well, as early as A Game of Thrones, where Lord Beric Dondarrion is similarly ambushed by Gregor Clegane’s men at the Mummer’s Ford (keep in mind that Isildur’s final battle took place near Anduin, the Great River). Is it a coincidence that among Beric’s companions we find Ser Gladden Wylde? And Edric Dayne, who – it seems – play the role of the ‘faithful squire’. Ohtar rescued Narsil, while Edric pulled Beric’s body from the river… and Isildur’s corpse ended up in a river (although in The Unfinished Tales it is implied that Saruman later found his body, and had it burned, to cover up the fact that he was searching for the One Ring on his own)…

The shards of Narsil were reforged when Isildur’s Heir, Aragorn, rode to war.

The Sword of Elendil was forged anew by the Elvish smiths, and on its blade was traced a device of seven stars set between a crescent Moon and the rayed Sun, and about them was written many runes; for Aragorn son of Arathorn was going to war upon the marches of Mordor. Very bright was that sword when it was made whole again; the light of the sun shone redly in it, and the light of the moon shone cold, and its edge was hard and keen. And Aragorn gave it a new name and called it Andúril, The Flame of the West.

A sword of ice and fire indeed… Is Dawn GRRM’s Narsil? Or Lightbringer?

It seems that in ASOIAF, the mysterious black stone structures are remnants of the Great Empire’s constructions. Interestingly, the Dúnedain have a connection with such stone as well.

On the Hill of Erech in Gondor, stood a smooth stone globe, the black stone six feet in diameter. Men whispered that it fell from heaven, but others said that Isildur himself brought it from the fallen Númenor. When Elendil’s son made a pact with the hill tribes of that region, they swore upon this black stone that they’ll come to his aid if it came to war with Sauron. But they proved treacherous, and Isildur cursed them – they became the Oathbreakers, and their wraiths lingered in Dunharrow, on the Paths of the Dead.

Long had the terror of the Dead lain upon that hill and upon the empty fields around it. For upon it stood a black stone, round as a great globe, the height of a man, though its half was buried in the ground. Unearthly it looked, as though it had fallen from the sky, as some believed, but those who remembered still the lore of Westernesse told that it had been brought out of the ruin of Númenor and there set by Isildur at his landing. None of the people of the valley dared to approach it, nor would they dwell near, for they said that it was a trysting-place for the Shadow-men, and there they would gather in times of fear, thronging round the Stone and whispering.

But Aragorn, the Heir of Isildur, finally arrived, and gave them a chance to fulfill their millenia-old oath, as Malbeth the Seer foretold long ago: ‘The Dead awaken; for the hour is come for the oathbreakers: at the Stone of Erech they shall stand again and hear there a horn in the hills ringing’.

Shadow-men and black unearthly stones… The Bloodstone Emperor’s black stone that fell from heaven and the black oily stone seems to be more of a Lovecraft influence, but who knows, maybe GRRM was inspired by the Stone of Erech as well.

To sum up, it appears quite likely that when creating House Dayne and House Hightower, George R.R. Martin used Tolkien’s Dúnedain as a source of inspiration. If you want to see the ramifications of this for the Mythical Astronomy, check out LML’s The Stark that Brings the Dawn.

That’s all for now, but don’t worry, this essay, although quite long, was but an introduction to Tolkienic ASOIAF. I’m not sure when the next episode will be released, but as you’ve seen, we have many things left to discuss. Thanks to all who supported me while creating this essay, especially LML, without whose encouragement, I’d probably never begin, and ArchmasterAemma of The Red Mice at Play blog, who read my draft and provided valuable comments and suggestions. You’re all amazing!

Thanks to You, for checking out this essay. If you enjoyed it, well, I guess I did a good job as well. If you have any questions or theories, please post them in the comments below. If you know anyone who would probably enjoy this GRRM-J.R.R.T. talk, please share this episode with him.

And above all else, thanks to George R.R. Martin and J.R.R. Tolkien, for creating those amazing secondary world, which seem more real than real, and will surely be appreciated for many generations of readers.

Namárië!

Yours, Bluetiger.


Obviously, the copyrights to all excerpts from books, interviews and other publications I have quoted, belong to their rightful owners.

Bibliography:

by J.R.R. Tolkien

The Hobbit or There and Back Again
The Lord of the Rings
The Fellowship of the Ring
The Two Towers
The Return of the King
– The Appendixes
The Silmarillion, edited by Christopher Tolkien
The Unfinished Tales, edited by Christopher Tolkien
The History of Middle-earth, edited by Christopher Tolkien
– Volume XII, The Peoples of Middle-earth

The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien, edited by Humphrey Carpenter and Christopher Tolkien

J.R.R. Tolkien: A Biography, by Humphrey Carpenter

by George R.R. Martin

A Song of Ice and Fire
– A Game of Thrones
– A Clash of Kings
– A Storm of Swords
– A Feast for Crows
– A Dance with Dragons

The Knight of the Seven Kingdoms
– The Hedge Knight
– The Sworn Sword
– The Mystery Knight

The Princess and the Queen
The Rogue Prince
The Sons of the Dragon

The World of Ice and Fire, with Elio Garcia and Linda Antonsson

GRRM: A RRetrospective (Dreamsongs)

Interviews and articles

George R.R. Martin: The Rolling Stone Interview
George R.R. Martin on J.R.R. Tolkien, Birthing Dragons, The Grateful Dead, Hollywood and More
George R. R. Martin on the One Game of Thrones Change He ‘Argued Against’ (TIME interview)
George R.R. Martin asks: “What was Aragorn’s tax policy?” (The Tolkien Society)
George R.R. Martin: My ending will reflect The Lord of the Rings (The Tolkien Society)
George R.R. Martin: “I revere The Lord of the Rings” (The Tolkien Society)
George R.R. Martin explains where Tolkien got it wrong
George R.R. Martin on J.R.R. Tolkien and Complex Fantasy

Recommended reading

The Mythical Astronomy of Ice and Fire by LML
The Clanking Dragon by Joe Magician

(for more see the ‘Blogs I Follow’ sidebar)


 

Advertisements

Post Bluetigera na forum ‘Ogień i Lód’

Przyszłość Mitycznej Astronomii PL

W związku z obserwowanym od dłuższego czasu spadkiem zainteresowania Pieśnią Lodu i Ognia, zwłaszcza po zakończeniu emisji 7 sezonu telewizyjnej Gry o tron, mam do Was kilka pytań związanych z przyszłością projektu Mityczna Astronomia PL, czyli serii tłumaczeń esejów autorstwa LMLa na polski.

1. Czy uważacie, że praca nad przekładem kolejnych odcinków ma sens?

Liczba czytelników stale spada (864 w listopadzie ’17, 448 w lutym bieżącego roku, 441 w marcu). Podobnie ma się sprawa z liczbą wyświetleń wątków MA na forum i bloga The Amber Compendium. Każdy kolejny przetłumaczony esej cieszy się mniejszym zainteresowaniem.

2. Co jest Waszym zdaniem przyczyną zupełnego braku dyskusji na temat M.A.?

3. Czy bylibyście w stanie czytać Mityczną Astronomię po angielsku gdyby projekt jej przekładu na polski został zakończony?

4. Czy macie obecnie czas na czytanie M.A.?

5. Czy uważacie, że dobrym rozwiązaniem jest tymczasowe przerwanie tłumaczenia M.A. , np. do czasu premiery 8 sezonu, ogłoszenia daty publikacji Wichrów Zimy itp. ?

6. Czy wolelibyście żeby teorie LMLa były przedstawiane w krótszej formie, np. artykułów mojego autorstwa?

7. Czy uważacie, że prelekcje o M.A. na polskich konwentach mają sens?

8. Czy jesteście zainteresowani serią o nawiązaniach do dzieł Profesora J.R.R. Tolkiena w PLIO (mojego autorstwa, we współpracy z LML-em)?

9. Jak Waszym zdaniem najskuteczniej promować M.A.? (założenie strony na Facebooku nie przyniosło większych rezultatów)

10. Czy jakość przekładu M.A. na polski jest dobra? – może to właśnie słaby styl, błędy ortograficzne itp. przeszkadzają Wam w odbiorze M.A. i zniechęcają do tej serii?

11. Czy moje (momentami żałosne) zachowanie typu: kłótnie w sekcji z komentarzami na FSGK, posty o tym ‘jacy to wszyscy są źli i nie chcą czytać moich ‘świetnych’ tłumaczeń’, pewne wypowiedzi w różnych miejscach, niedotrzymywanie terminów, wspominanie o M.A. w innych wątkach i w komentarzach na FSGK itp. mają wpływ na Wasz odbiór M.A.?

12. Czy wolelibyście żeby tłumaczenia M.A. były publikowane na ‘Ogniu i Lodzie’?

Serdecznie dziękuję za wszelkiego rodzaju uwagi i rady!

[Jeśli chcielibyście przekazać mi jakieś uwagi, komentarze, rady, opinie itp. – niekoniecznie związane z tymi 12 pytaniami – będę bardzo wdzięczny]


Odpowiedź Super Innego:

Ad. 1. – Ma, spadek jest związany ogólnie z cyklicznością zainteresowania światem PLiO, a ponadto chyba szwankuje komunikacja, myślałem, że swoje dzieło translatorskie już skończyłeś i wstawiłeś na forum.
Ad 2. Bo to jest pokazywanie prozy Martina głównie od strony technicznej, owszem pouczające, ale nie bardzo wiadomo, co ma stanowić zarzewie dyskusji w tych erudycyjnych interpretacjach krytycznoliterackich. Nie znajduję niczego, czym miałbym być sprowokowany do wypowiedzi. Wypadałoby komentować długimi elaboratami, na które brakuje mi sił.
Ad 3. Jedni czytelnicy zapewne daliby radę, a drudzy nie. Zapewne Ci bardziej biegli w angielskim już obywają się bez tłumaczeń.
Ad 4. Mam czas.
Ad 5. Jeśli tego jest na prawdę dużo i ciągle się rozrasta, to nie bardzo, bo znów przełożysz tylko fragment.
Ad 6. Ciekawy pomysł, zwłaszcza jeśli dokładałbyś do tego, coś co dawałoby jakiś fajny powód do dyskusji.
Ad 7. Nie wiem.
Ad 8. Ciekawy pomysł.
Ad. 9. Nie wiem.
Ad 10, Jak dla mnie dobra, ale tu najlepiej oceniliby ci, którzy tłumaczeń nie potrzebują.
Ad 11. ????? Nie skupiam się aż tak bardzo na śledzeniu twojej osoby, wybacz.
Ad. 12. Można by równolegle.

Odpowiedź na post Super Innego:

Pytanie 1: Zgadzam się z twoją analizą, rzeczywiście od dłuższego czasu zainteresowanie PLIO jest (przynajmniej w Polsce) dość nikłe. Wygląda na to, że większość czytelników przyciągał serial, więc teraz nie ma ich co zatrzymać. Wydaje mi się również, że PLIO nie ma aż tylu wiernych fanów co dzieła Profesora Tolkiena.
Przeglądam od czasu do czasu poświęcone im fora – i zawsze coś się tam dzieje, nawet jeśli samych użytkoników pozostało niewielu. Niestety dla większości fanów PLIO nie jest czymś takim jak np. ‘Silmarillion’ lub ‘Władca’… przeczytać raz, potem czekać na ‘Wichry’. Biorąc pod uwagę ilu, przynajmniej teoretycznie, czytelników ma PLIO (liczbę sprzedanych książek), liczba poważnych analiz i teorii jest raczej mała (w Polsce mamy DAELa, kilka osób z tego forum, trochę ludzi na innych forach… i to wszystko). Chyba po prostu mało kto traktuje fantastykę jako poważną literaturę.

”chyba szwankuje komunikacja, myślałem, że swoje dzieło translatorskie już skończyłeś i wstawiłeś na forum” – wydawało mi się, że wszyscy zainteresowani zdają sobie sprawę z tego, że od stycznia 2017 ‘Mityczna Astronomia’ jest publikowana na moim blogu na WordPressie, The Amber Compendium – taki format znacznie ułatwia opracowanie tekstu (zdjęcia, filmy, linki, przypisy, czionki, cytaty).

Wszystkie tłumaczenia od tego czasu pojawiały się tylko na TAC, na Ogniu i Lodzie pubikowałem ewentualnie jakieś fragmenty i zapowiedzi. Oto lista przetłumaczonych obecnie esejów (linki na stronie głównej TAC – zakładka ‘TŁUMACZENIA MITYCZNEJ ASTRONOMII’:

tłumaczenia na polski:

George R.R. Martin pisze współczesną mitologię
LML TV Odcinek 1: Długa Noc
Krwawnikowe Kompendium
1. Astronomia wyjaśnia legendy lodu i ognia
2. Krwawnikowy Cesarz Azor Ahai
3. Fale Nocy i Księżycowej Krwi
4. Góra kontra Żmija i Młot Wód
6. Lucifer znaczy Światłonośca
Święty Zakon Zielonych Zombie

1. Ostatni Bohater i Król Ziarna
2. Król Zimy, Władca Śmierci
3. Straż Długiej Nocy

O autorze – LMLu (Jak powstała Mityczna Astronomia?)

Kompendium z Drewna Czardrzew

1. Szary Król i Morski Smok

Pytanie 2: 

Zgadzam się, raczej trudno dyskutować na temat pierwszych 4 odcinków ‘Krwawnikowego Kompendium’ – można się z nimi zgadzać, nie zgadzać, albo czegoś nie rozumieć i mieć pytania… ale już np. taki ‘Ostatni Bohater’ przedstawia dość konkretną teorię, o przyszłości Jona Snow w ‘Wichrach Zimy’. Ogólnie mówiąc, wszystkie najnowsze odcinki Mitycznej Astronomii skupiają się na jednej lub kilku teoriach i pomysłach, w przeciwieństwie do początkowych, które opowiadają o sprawach bardzo ogólnych – ale w końcu jakiś fundament jest potrzebny. ”Początek to czas dla podjęcia najsubtelniejszych działań, by wszystko znalazło się na właściwym miejscu” (Frank Herbert, Diuna)

Pytanie 5: Też się nad tym zastanowiłem i doszedłem do wniosku, że gdybym teraz odpuścił, to cała sprawa się rozsypie i trudno będzie kiedykolwiek wrócić do Mitycznej Astronomii PL… ale jednocześnie muszę przyznać, że straciłem zapał do spędzania długich godzin nad tymi tłumaczeniami, skoro nie mam nawet pewności, że ktokolwiek się nimi zainteresuje. Może te artykuły-streszczenia do nie taki zły pomysł… Z drugiej strony ciężko streścić niektóre teksty LMLa, same przykłady i dowody zajmują mnóstwo miejsca… a raczej postawienie na częste publikacje esejów kosztem tego co w nich najważniejsze to nie to o co chodzi…

Pytanie 11: 
To pytanie odnosiło sie do osób, które na przykład czytały moje kłótnie z innymi użytkownikami w komentarzach na FSGK, albo ‘recenzje’ książek, których nawet nie czytałem, ale i tak pisałem na ich temat różne dziwne rzeczy (np. o ‘Kulturowych grach w Grze o tron’, która okazała się zupełnie inna niż się spodziewałem). Chodzi mi o to, czy ktoś zraził się do MA tylko przez moją postawę (+ to ciągłe narzekanie na OIL, że nikt nie chce czytać moich tłumaczeń).
Zrozumiałem, że jestem teraz pewnego rodzaju ambasadorem MA w Polsce, i choćby przez szacunek dla czytelników i samego autora nie powinienem wdawać się w jakieś awantury mogące zaważyć na czyjejś ocenie jego pracy.

Pytanie 5 c.d. 

”Jeśli tego jest na prawdę dużo i ciągle się rozrasta, to nie bardzo, bo znów przełożysz tylko fragment.”

Oryginalna MA liczy sobie obecnie 6 serii (kompendiów: The Bloodstone Compendium, The Moons of Ice and Fire, The Blood of the Other, The Sacred Order of Green Zombies, The Weirwood Compendium i The Weirwood Goddess)… a są też odcinki dostępne jedynie na YouTube, livestreamy, dłuższe komentarze itp. W języku polskim dostępne jest 5/6 ‘Krwawnikowego Kompendium’ (bez Tyrion Targaryen) i cały ‘Święty Zakon Zielonych Zombie’.
Zostałem daleko w tyle…

LML zapowiedział, że w ciągu najbliższych dwóch miesięcy będzie tylko jeden odcinek, 4 część ‘Krwi Innego’… przerwa jest spowodowana koniecznością przygotowania się na prelekcje o MA na ‘Con of Thrones 2018’. [program]

(Panele: The Nature Cycle Mythology of A Song of Ice and Fire, Discovering the Warrior of Light, What Makes George R. R. Martin Great, Subverting the Seven: Deconstructing the Faith’s Archetypes, Jon of the Dead, Dragons!, Giants and the Children and Beyond oraz Mythical Astronomy and Symbolism)

Chociaż osobiście najbardziej żałuję, że nie będę na prelekcji All That Is Gold Does Not Glitter: The Connections Between Lord of The Rings and ASOIAF Joe’a Magiciana, Patricka Sponaugle’a (których znam z fandomu MA i Twittera) i Joanny Lannister. Sekcja ‘The Empire of the Dayne’ w eseju ‘Eldric Shadowchaser’ jest oparta o moją teorię o Numenorze i GEOTD (WCŚ), ale z uwzględnieniem gry słów odkrytej przez Joe’a.

W każdym razie, anglojęzyczna MA coraz bardziej ucieka.

Dzięki za cenny komentarz!

Nie jestem pewien co dokładnie teraz zrobię – z jednej strony nie czuję jakiegoś szczególnego zapału do dalszego tłumaczenia Mityczne Astronomii (skoro i tak mało kto to czyta, a większość spokojne dałaby sobie radę z oryginałem), z drugiej strony wiem, że jeśli teraz się poddam, to może to być już koniec MA w Polsce…

Chyba po prostu poczekam trochę, zajmę się czymś innym… Mam w planach dłuższą serię pod tytułem ‘The Tolkienic A Song of Ice and Fire’ (od września zeszłego roku, do tej pory nie znalazłem czasu). Może bylibyście zainteresowani takimi esejami również po polsku?
LML też radzi, że skoro sie wypaliłem z tymi tłumaczeniami, powinienem zająć się czymś innym, choćby tymi tekstami o Tolkienie, które od dawna zaniedbuję.

A poza tym są jeszcze moje własne opowiadania i inne teksty, które równiez zaniedbałem.

Nie myślcie proszę, że się na Was obraziłem… po prostu nie czuję już takiego zapału do pracy nad tłumaczeniami jak kiedyś, a zainteresowanie PLIO znacznie ostatnimi czasy zmalało. Dziękuję za miłe przyjęcie na Ogniu i Lodzie, gdy po raz pierwszy się tutaj pojawiłem latem 2016 roku. (Nie oznacza to również, że odchodzę z forum – nadal będę tu zaglądał i brał udział w ciekawych dyskusjach jakie będą miały miejsce [oby]).

Do zobaczenia! (A raczej ‘do przeczytania’)

– Bluetiger

Szary Król i Morski Smok – w odcinkach

LML przedstawia Mityczną Astronomię Lodu i Ognia – Kompendium z Drewna Czardrzew, rozdział I:

Szary Król i Morski Smok

(The Grey King and the Sea Dragon), w przekładzie Bluetigera


WC1

The Weirwood Compendium by LML


∆    Lista odcinków∆  ∆

Poniżej znajduje się spis odcinków, w których publikowane było tłumaczenie eseju The Grey King and the Sea Dragon LMLa The Mythical Astronomy of Ice and Fire na polski.


Szary Król i Morski Smok: całość (niedostępna, tłumaczenie nadal trwa)

1. Szary Król i Morski Smok: Wstęp (Introduction, 1391 słów)
2. Szary Król i Morski Smok: Morski Smok (The Sea Dragon, 4393 słowa)
3. Szary Król i Morski Smok: Język lewiatana (The Language of Leviathan, 4934 słowa)
4. Szary Król i Morski Smok: ‘Jakaś śmierdząca ryba’ (Some Smelly Fish, 3498 słów)
5. Szary Król i Morski Smok: Podejrzane Żebra |Naggi| (A Fishy Rack of Ribs, 3626 słów)
6. Szary Król i Morski Smok: Korona z Drewna Czardrzew (The Weirwood Crown, 2468 słów)
7. Szary Król i Morski Smok: Zielonowidze ognia (Greenseers of Fire, 5492 słowa)

Szary Król i Morski Smok – Wstęp

LML przedstawia Mityczną Astronomię Lodu i Ognia – Kompendium z Drewna Czardrzew, rozdział I:

Szary Król i Morski Smok

(The Grey King and the Sea Dragon), w przekładzie Bluetigera


WC1

The Weirwood Compendium by LML


∆    Wstęp ∆  ∆

Witajcie moi przyjaciele i mityczni astronomowie! Dzisiaj porozmawiamy o czardrzewach, płonących drzewach oraz ognistych zielonowidzach. Przypomnijcie sobie, jeśli chcecie, czwarty rozdział naszego małego projektu Krwawnikowe Kompendium, w którym analizowaliśmy scenę próby walki pomiędzy ser Gregorem ‘Górą’ oraz Oberynem Martellem, Czerwoną Żmiją z Dorne. Kulminacją tego pojedynku był moment ‘gregorowego zaćmienia’ – księżycowy wojownik Gregor utworzył zaćmienie słońca, stając pomiędzy Oberynem i słońcem. W tej właśnie chwili pokryta czarnym olejem słoneczna włócznia Oberyna uderzyła niczym błyskawica i wreszcie dotknęła ser Gregora, przebijając kolczugę, by ugodzić w ramię.

Zinterpretowaliśmy to wydarzenie – i wiele innych scen, gdzie ktoś zostaje raniony w ramię w chwili, gdy pojawia się grom – jako wskazówki zdradzające nam, że Młot Wód i piorun Boga Sztormów to tak naprawdę pradawne opisy uderzenia księżycowych meteorów. Rozmawialiśmy również o tym, że nordycki bóg burz Thor włada młotem, który miota piorunami, naprowadzając nas na połączenie pomiędzy boskimi młotami i gromami miotanymi przez Boga Sztormów. Wspomnieliśmy także o tym, że w starożytności meteoryty były czasem nazywane ‘kamieniami gromu’ (thunder stones). Przyjrzeliśmy się scenom, gdzie atak smoka z nieba został opisany jako grom. Ostatecznie, sądzę, że przedstawiłem solidne dowody na to, że Młot Wód i piorun Boga Sztormów to rzeczywiście księżycowe meteory.

Jednakże, najważniejszym aspektem opowieści o Szarym Królu jest to, że ukradł ogień bogów i przyniósł go ludzkości, tak jak Prometeusz, Lucyfer i wielu innych. Rozpoznaliśmy w ‘kradzieży ognia bogów’ jeden z najważniejszych, definiujących motywów mitu o Azorze Ahai. Z całą pewnością nie umknęło naszej uwadze to, że ten właśnie motyw przejawia się bardzo często w folklorze związanym z Szarym Królem. Tak naprawdę, według opowieści Szary Król wszedł w posiadanie ognia na dwa różne sposoby. Jedna z nich głosi, że heros drwinami sprawił, że rozgniewany Bóg Sztormów cisnął piorunem w drzewo, sprawiając, że stanęło w płomieniach. Z kolei inna legenda utrzymuje, że bohater zdobył ogień zabijajac morskiego smoka Naggę. Ach, ten Szary Król, widać, że ma apetyt na boski ogień! Aeron Mokra Czupryna przekazuje nam krótkie streszczenie historii o morskim smoku w Uczcie dla wron:

Nagga była pierwszą z morskich smoków, najpotężniejszą z tych zrodzonych z fal bestii. Żywiła się krakenami i lewiatanami, a rozgniewana potrafiła zatapiać całe wyspy. Mimo to Szary Król zdołał ją zabić, a Utopiony Bóg zamienił jej kości w kamień, by ludzie nigdy nie przestawali się zdumiewać odwagą pierwszego z królów. 

A nieco później słyszymy, że Szary Król wszedł w posiadanie ognia Morskiego Smoka:

Komnatę ogrzewał żywy ogień Naggi, który Szary Król uczynił swym poddanym.

Świat Lodu i Ognia opowiada nam o kradzieży ognia z gromu Boga Sztormów:

Kapłani i minstrele z Żelaznych Wysp przypisują Szaremu Królowi wiele cudownych czynów. To właśnie on przyniósł na Ziemię ogień: zadrwił z Boga Sztormów, ąż wreszcie ten uderzył gniewnie piorunem i podpalił drzewo.

Według naszej teorii zarówno piorun Boga Sztormów, jak i morski smok to zmitologizowane opisy uderzeń księżycowych meteorów. Azor Ahai zrabował ogień bogów kradnąc z nieba księżyc i wykonując Światłonoścę z ciała księżyca, które spadło na ziemię niczym nawałnica ognistych smoków. Tymczasem Szary Król sprowadził z nieba ogień, dokładnie tak jak Azor Ahai, a później w jakiś sposób wszedł w posiadanie tego ognia. Tak jak Azor Ahai władał ogniem bogów w postaci czarnych mieczy wykonanych z księżycowych meteorytów, sądzę, że również Żelaźni Ludzie całkiem dosłownie dysponowali metalem z czarnych księżycowych meteorytów. Przyjrzyjcie się temu cytatowi ze Świata Lodu i Ognia, z którym zostawiłem Was na końcu trzeciego rozdziału, Fal Nocy i Księżycowej Krwi:

“Kiedy zaś walka przenosiła się na brzeg, potężni królowie i sławni wojownicy padali pod ciosami łupieżców niczym koszone zboże, tak licznie, że mieszkańcy zielonych krain powtarzali sobie, że żelaźni ludzie to demony z jakiegoś podwodnego piekła, bronione przez złowrogie czary i noszące plugawą, czarną broń, wysysającą dusze tych, których zabili.”

Przypomnijcie sobie, że Światłonośca miał ponoć wypić krew i duszę Nissy Nissy, gdy ją zabił. Zaproponowałem, że Światłonośca był mieczem z czarnej stali wykonanej z księżycowego meteorytu, więc powiązanie Światłonoścy z tą pijącą dusze czarną bronią Żelaznych Ludzi staje się kuszące. Światłonośca był ogniem bogów i – jak sądzę – czarnym mieczem. Szary Król i Żelaźni Ludzie równiez posiadali ogień bogów, władali również tym podejrzanym czarnym orężem.

Mamy też to ogromne Krzesło (Tron) z Morskiego Kamienia (Seastone Chair), wykute na kształt krakena z czarnego oleistego kamienia. Jak odkryliśmy w Górze kontra Żmii, poszlaki łączące oleisty/tłusty czarny kamień z księżycowymi meteorami są bardzo liczne – zaproponowałem, że czarny oleisty kamień pochodzi z księżycowych meteorytów lub jest ziemskim kamieniem spalonym na czarno przez toksyczny/magiczny ogień księżycowych meteorów. Fakt, że Żelaźni Ludzie posiadali ogień bogów I czarny oleisty kamień sprawia, iż zaczynam się zastanawiać nad tym, czy taka właśnie jest prawda o tej pijącej dusze czarnej broni – że była mieczami wykonanymi z czarnego oleistego kamienia, ognia bogów ściągnięgo w dół na ziemię.

Jest też sprawa czardrzew, które pojawiają się w każdym micie o Szarym Królu. Na przykład: sposobem w jaki heros wszedł w posiadanie ognia Boga Sztormów było płonące drzewo, zapalone przez boski piorun. Jak wspomniałem pod koniec Góry kontra Żmii, czardrzewo to symbol płonącego drzewa. Jego pięcioramienne czerwone liście są opisywane jako ‘zakrwawione dłonie’ lub ‘płomyki’. Dodając krzyczącą twarz płaczącą krwią, otrzymujemy obraz płonącej osoby-drzewa. Związana z czardrzewami magia więzi zielonowidzów rzeczywiście może byś postrzegana jako pewnego rodzaju ogień bogów, zaś mitologia związana z Yggdrasil, inspiracją dla czardrzew, ma bezpośrednie związki z motywem zdobycia ognia, magii i wiedzy bogów, jak wkrótce pokażę. Mówiąc prościej, ogólne wyrażenie ‘ogień bogów’ reprezentuje ich wiedzę i moc, a dokładnie to wieź z czardrzewem daje zielonowidzowi.

Mit o morskim smoku również jest związany z czardrzewami, ponieważ łukowe filary z bladego kamienia znane jako Żebra Naggi to niemal na pewno skamieniałe czardrzewa, które po tysiącach lat zamieniają się właśnie w blady kamień. W trzeciej opowieści Szary Król wykonuje pierwszy longship (długi okręt) Żelaznych Ludzi z ‘twardego, jasnego drewna Ygg, demonicznego drzewa karmiącego się ludzkim mięsem’. Imię Ygg to dość oczywiste nawiązanie do Yggdrasil, mitycznego drzewa świata, na którym oparte jest wiele aspektów czardrzew – a zatem, znów widzimy motywy związane z czardrzewami przewijające się w micie o Szarym Królu i pierwszych Żelaznych Ludziach. I rzeczywiście, istnieje dobra teoria – o której później porozmawiamy – spekulująca, że blade kamienne filary uznawane za klatkę piersiową morskiego smoka mogą tak naprawdę być odwróconym kadłubem dużego statku wykonanego z czardrzewa. Świat Lodu i Ognia sugeruje, że Szary Król zrobił dokładnie coś takiego – budował drakkary z czardrzewa.

A zatem… podczas naszego pierwszego wypadu w burzowy świat teologii Żelaznych Ludzi wyjaśnimy dlaczego Morski Smok, piorun Boga Sztormów i inne elementy mitologii Szarego Króla zdają się odnosić zarówno do meteorów, jak i czardrzew. Choć brzmi do dość dziwnie, odpowiedź jest bardzo prosta i logiczna. Wyjawia również niezwykłą prawdę o Azorze Ahai, być może najważniejsze co Wam o nim powiedziałem, odkąd po raz pierwszy zdradziłem, że był ‘tym złym’, który zniszczył księżyc i wywołał Długą Noc. Ale na to będziecie musieli poczekać aż do końca odcinka  🙂.

To powiedziawszy, niech rozpocznie się to kompendium z drewna czardrzew!


You can read the original text here.

Pozostałe odcinki tłumaczenia eseju The Grey King and the Sea Dragon możecie znaleźć tutaj.

Nowy odcinek Mitycznej Astronomii – The Stark that Brings the Dawn

Serdecznie zachęcam osoby mające taką możliwość do przeczytania nowego odcinka The Mythical Astronomy of Ice and Fire LMLa – opublikowanego 27 marca 2018 roku The Stark that Brings the Dawnczyli drugiego eseju z serii The Blood of the Other (zobacz: wstęp Prelude to a Chill oraz A Baelful Bard and a Promised Prince).


TheStarkThatBringsTheDawn.png


Odcinek przedstawia poglądy LMLa w sprawie pochodenia rodu Dayne’ów (z Wielkiego Cesarstwa Świtu), pokazuje również literackie inspiracje George’a R.R. Martina – powieści Michaela Moorcocka i postać Elrica z Melnibone, Atlantydę. Nie ukrywam, że najbliższa mojemu sercu jest część Great Empire of the Dayne – o Dunedainach, Numenorejczykach, Narsilu oraz Turinie i bliźniaczych mieczach wykutych z czarnego meteorytu przez Eöla. Rozdział ten powstał w oparciu o odkrycia Bluetigera i Joe’a Magiciana.

Now most of you reading this will already be familiar with the Great Empire of the Dawn theory, but today I have a special treat for you. I’m going to show you an entirely new line of evidence to support the “House Dayne descends from the Great Empire of the Dawn” theory – and we’ll do that by opening up a portal into Middle Earth. Meaning, we’re going to draw upon the Lord of the Rings knowledge of my good friend Blue Tiger, who translates Mythical Astronomy of Ice and Fire into Polish, which by the way is an impressive feat! If you follow me on Twitter ( @thedragonLML ) then you have probably seen some of Blue Tiger’s Lord of the Rings / ASOIAF commentary, and the correlations between House Dayne and Tolkien’s Dunedain are some of the most striking (by the way, Blue Tiger is @lordbluetiger on Twitter). I think I can do this without diving too deep into Middle Earth, which is a very deep can of worms, let me tell you. I’ll also give a hat-tip to good friend Joe Magician, who contributed to the following information as well. He’s got a new YouTube channel by the way, with a “how to make a weirwood” video that you really need to watch, so check that out.

Esej LMLa w języku angielskim możecie znaleźć tutaj: The Stark that Brings the Dawn

… a już za kilka dni zostanie opublikowana trzecia część Krwi InnegoEldric Shadowchaser.

Esej Eldric Shadowchaser został opublikowany 30 marca 2018 roku.


EldricShadowchaser


 

Kolejne tłumaczenie Mitycznej Astronomii – ankieta

W ostatni piątek ukazał się ostatni – trzynasty – odcinek polskiego tłumaczenia Góry kontra Żmii LMLa, a nieco później jeden post zawierający wszystkie rozdziały. Najdłuższy, liczący sobie niemal 31 000 słow, esej Mitycznej Astronomii jest już w pełni dostępny po polsku. W związku z tym pojawia się pytanie: tłumaczeniem którego odcinka powinienem teraz się zająć. Moim zdaniem najwięcej sensu ma wybór pomiędzy dwoma tekstami: Tyrion Targaryen oraz The Grey King and the Sea Dragon (Szary Król i Morski Smok). Pod koniec tego wpisu umieściłem ankietę, bardzo serdecznie proszę o jej wypełnienie.

Oto krótki opis wspomnianych odcinków:


Tyrion Targaryen to piąty (w kolejności opublikowania) esej Krwawnikowego Kompendium, pierwszej serii LMLa, do której należą także Astronomia wyjaśnia legendy lodu i ogniaKrwawnikowy Cesarz Azor AhaiFale Nocy i Księżycowej KrwiGóra kontra Żmija i Młot Wód oraz Lucifer Znaczy Światłonośca (VI odcinek, który zdecydowałem się przetłumaczyć przed IV i V, z racji na względnie małą długość oraz to, że opowiada o sprawach bezpośrednio związanych z tematyką pierwszych trzech – jest oparty na starszym eseju LMLa, który został napisany na nowo i ponownie opublikowany jako szósty odcinek).

Tyrion… (22 594 słowa w wersji oryginalnej) nie stanowi bezpośredniej kontynuacji Góry kontra Żmii, można go raczej uznać za całkowicie odrębny tekst. Oczywiście, przed jego przeczytaniem warto zaznajowić się z tezami teorii Mityczna Astronomia przedstawionymi w poprzednich esejach, jednak nie jest to absolutnie konieczne.

W tym tekście, opublikowanym 9 maja 2016 roku, LML omawia popularną w fandomie Pieśni Lodu i Ognia teorię, według której Tyrion jest tak naprawdę synem Aerysa II Targaryena i Lady Joanny Lannister, żony Tywina. Nie jest to jednak typowe podejście do tego tematu, który wielu innych bloggerów i autorów teorii przerobiło na niezliczone sposoby. LML skupia się na symbolice, metaforach, snach, a przede wszystkim na mitologii i legendach nieznanego większości czytelników, Chin.

LML zauważa zadziwiające podobieństwa pomiędzy Tyrionem a Sun Wukongiem, zwanym Królem Małp, boga-żartownisia (trickster-god) pojawiającego się w eposie Wędrówka na Zachód. Większa część eseju skupia się właśnie na tych powiązaniach i ich znaczeniu dla symboliki i fabuły PLIO. Innym tematem poruszanym w tym eseju jest sprawa smoczych snów, a także gargulców (z Winterfell i Smoczej Skały) oraz Brana.

Tekst po angielsku możecie znaleźć tutaj.


The Grey King and the Sea Dragon – liczący 25 792 słowa Szary Król i Morski Smok (25 sierpnia 2016) to bezpośrednia kontynuacja odcinka Góra kontra Żmija, który kończy się pytaniem:

Ostatnim razem wspomniałem, że istnieje całkiem sporo ciekawych powiązań pomiędzy zielonowidzami/zmiennoskórymi/starymi bogami a Azorem Ahai i magią ognia – wygląda na to, że jednym z nich jest motyw płonących liści reprezentujących ksieżycowe meteory. Widzimy Berica i Bloodravena zasiadających na pewnego rodzaju tronach z korzeni czardrzew. Jest też (wkrótce wskrzeszony) zmiennoskóry Jon Snow, który również jest postacią reprezentującą odrodznego Azora Ahai, dokładnie tak jak Beric… przypomina się również ta zadziwiająca scena z Tańca ze smokami, w której Melisandre przywołuje Ducha do siebie, przełamując więź pomiędzy zmiennoskórym i jego zwierzęciem, a przynajmniej tak się wydaje. Na dodatek Mel zachęca Jona do rozwijania swoich zdolności, co jest tym dziwniejsze, że zazwyczaj nie ma nic przeciwko paleniu czardrzew.

Kończąc – i zapowiadając nadchodzący odcinek, w którym rozwinę te powiązania – wspomnę, że grom Boga Sztormów, który znamy już jako księżycowy meteor, jest znany z tego, że sprawił, iż DRZEWO STANĘŁO W PŁOMIENIACH. A czymże jest czardrzewo, jeśli nie krzyczącym drzewem o płonących dłoniach?

Esej ten skupia się na Żelaznych Wyspach, które wielu czytelników – według LMLa niesłusznie – uważa za miejsce nudne i pozbawione sensu, a jego mieszkańców za niezbyt ważnych dla fabuły piratów ‘z innej bajki’.

Szary Król… analizuje przeróżne mity, legendy i wierzenia z Żelaznych Wysp, bada również herby, wydarzenia historyczne i symbolikę nazw i opisów zamków, okrętów i innych miejsc.

Pierwszy rozdział opowiada o Szarym Królu i morskim smoku o imieniu Nagga, który – według LMLa – jest niczym innym jak jednym z ksieżycowych meteorów, który uderzył w ocean doprowadzając do zatopienie wysp, lub zdruzgotania regionu w którym się dzisiaj znajdują, tak że to co niegdyś stanowiło część Westeros, zostało oderwane. Jednym z dowodów na to, że Wyspy były niegdyś większe i zasiadlone jest forteca Pyke, z tajemnicznym Tronem z Morskiego Kamienia. LML pokazuje również mitologiczne i biblijne inspiracje GRRMa – legendy o morskich smokach z naszego świata oraz potwora znanego jako Lewiatan, o którym Aeron wspomina w swych modlitwach.

Kolejny rozdział, Język lewiatana (w nawiązaniu do słów Aerona: Któż będzie naszym królem w miejsce Balona? Zaśpiewaj do mnie w języku lewiatana, bym poznał jego imię. Powiedz mi, o Panie pod falami, kto ma siłę by zmierzyć się ze sztormem na Pyke) rozwija temat biblijnego monstrum i jego wpływu na PLIO. LML przedstawia również możliwe pochodzenie imienia Azor Ahai (Aži Dahāka, Aži Sruuara, ahi). Następnie omawiani są różni ‘bogowie burzy’ z mitów naszego świata, np. Marduk, po czym LML pokazuje symboliczne znaczenie herbów rodów Volmarków, Harlawów, Wynchów oraz Goodbrotherów (oraz nazw siedzib ich bocznych gałęzi). Znaczny fragment jest poświęcony symbolice scen Aerona w zamku Hammerhorn.

Wyjaśnia również metaforyczne znaczenie inwazji Aegona I na Żelazne Wyspy i zgładzenia Qhorina Volmarka. Omawianych jest również wiele innych wydarzeń z historii tego królestwa.

W następnym rozdziale LML omawia powiązania pomiędzy Targaryenami, i patrząc bardziej ogólnie, Valyrianami, i morzem oraz morskimi smokami (sceny Dany na Balerionie). Przedstawiona zostaje również teoria o przybyciu na Wyspy ludzi z Wielkiego Cesarstwa Świtu lub Valyrii, a także teoria według której ‘Żebra Naggi’ to tak naprawdę pozostałości ogromnego okrętu z przed tysięcy lat, być może wykonanego z czardrzewa. Według legend Szary Król wyknał pierwszy longship z drewna monstrualnego drzewa Ygg.

Rozdział Korona z Czardrzewa analizuje podobieństwa pomiędzy Szarmy Królem i zielonowidzami oraz motywem ‘ognia bogów’ i jego kradzieży. Możliwe, że Szary Król to nie kto inny jak przybyły do Westeros Azor Ahai, Krwawnikowy Cesarz. W Zielonowidzach Ognia LML pokazuje powiązania pomiędzy magią zmiennoskórych i zielonowidzów oraz magią ognia. Omawiany jest również motyw płonącego drzewa i jego związki z czardrzewami.

To pewnego zmiana w stosunku do poprzednich odcinków Mitycznej Astronomii, które skupiały się na mitach i legendach z Essos – Qarthu, Asshai, Morza Dothraków… Sądzę jednak, że Wam się spodoba. Pozornie uboga i pozbawiona sensu kultura Żelaznych Wysp okazuje się być pełna fascynujących rzeczy.

Szary Król i Morski Smok to pierwszy odcinek serii Kompendium z Drewna Czardrzew, stanowiący jej fundament. Kolejne odcinki rozwijają temat ‘ognia bogów’, płonących czardrzew, Szarego Króla jako zielonowidza-maga ognia… Pojawiają się również wątki związane z Odynem, Yggdrasil, Garthem Zielonorękim, o wielkim znaczeniu dla zrozumienia symboliki i głębszego dna fabuły PLIO.

Tekst w języku angielskim możecie znaleźć tutaj.


Jak widzicie, oba teksty są niesamowicie ciekawe… z tego powodu trudno mi podjąć decyzję, który z nich powinienem przetłumaczyć napierw. Proszę Was zatem o pomoc.

Wspomnę jednak, że bez względu na Wasz wspólny wybór, zacznę pracować nad tłumaczeniem dopiero za pewien czas – na pewno nie teraz, w Wielkim Tygodniu i podczas Triduum oraz świąt Wielkanocnych, możliwe również, że w kolejnym tygodniu również nie będę w stanie znaleźć dość czasu.

Postanowiłem w końcu napisać esej (a może nawet kilka) poświęcony nawiązaniom do dzieł J.R.R. Tolkiena (których to jestem wielkim miłośnikiem od wielu lat) w PLIO. Mam nadzieję, że zrozumiecie moją decyzję – i kto wie, może nawet spodoba Wam się ten nietypowy odcinek. Do napisania takiego tekstu, skupiajacego wiele moich wcześniejszych teorii i pomysłów, zachęcało mnie wiele osób, w tym LML.

Jednocześnie, od pewnego czasu zastanawiam się nad pojechaniem na Dni Fantastyki (29 czerwca – 1 lipca 2018) we Wrocławiu – do czego również zachęca mnie LML i kilka innych osób – i opowiedzenia tam o Mitycznej Astronomii. Co sądzicie o takim przedsięwzięciu?

Przy okazji zapytam, co sądzicie o Górze kontra Żmii i innych przetłumaczonych już odcinkach Astronomii? Czy zgadzacie się z tymi teoriami? A może chcielibyście się podzielić własnymi pomysłami? Zachęcam do komentowania – pod tym postem, w wątku na Ogniu i Lodzie, gdzie tylko chcecie. Jednocześnie, proszę o udostępnianie tych tekstów wszystkim fanom PLIO których znacie. Do tej pory Góra kontra Żmija miała 18 wyświetleń – a przecież mogłoby ich być znacznie więcej.

Radosnych Świąt Wielkiej Nocy!

– Mateusz (Bluetiger)

 

 

Góra kontra Żmija i Młot Wód

LML przedstawia Mityczną Astronomię Lodu i Ognia

Góra kontra Żmija i Młot Wód

(The Mountain vs. the Viper and the Hammer of the Waters), w przekładzie Bluetigera


Comp4


Spędziliśmy większą część dwóch ostatnich odcinków Krwawnikowego Kompendium używając różnych mitologicznych powiązań krwawnika (ang. bloodstone) jako punktu wyjścia w naszej próbie wyjaśnienia rozmaitych aspektów kataklizmu Długiej Nocy i przeróżnych cech charakterystycznych Światłonoścy (ang. Lightbringer). Teraz, gdy już wiemy o co chodzi z ‘czarnymi krwawnikami’, użyjmy tych informacji, odnosząc je do pewnej niezwykle metaforycznej sceny – gdzie, jak zobaczymy – użyte zostały niemal wszystkie z tych ‘mitologicznych powiązań’.

Próba walki, mająca zadecydować o losie Tyriona, w której stają przeciw sobie książę Oberyn Martell, Czerwona Żmija z Dorne, oraz ser Gregor Clegane, Góra, Która Jeździ, to niesamowite wydarzenie. A staje się jeszcze lepsze, gdy odczytamy zawartą w nim mityczną astronomię.

Podejdę do tej sceny tak jak do ‘alchemicznych godów’ Dany pod koniec pierwszego eseju. To znaczy, że przebrniemy przez najważniejsze fragmenty, kawałek po kawałku, a w międzyczasie będę przytaczał inne sceny, z całej serii, posiadające odpowiadającą symbolikę. Gdy omawialiśmy alchemiczne gody Dany – gdzie przechodzi ognistą przemianę i budzi smoki – odnosiliśmy się również do innych scen w których pojawiała się ‘płonąca krew’ i ‘przemiana w ogniu’, by pokazać jak ze sobą współgrają, by opowiedzieć tę samą opowieść – tym razem znów tak uczynimy.

***

W gruncie rzeczy ten odcinek będzie recenzją rozdziału, ale w tak pokręcony i odmienny sposób, że koniec końców, nie będzie przypominał czegoś, co nazwalibyście ‘recenzją rozdziału’. Nie będzie również zbyt podobny do naszego zwykłego formatu, skupiania się na jednym pomyśle lub koncepcji, na przykład przyczynie Długiej Nocy lub Azorze Ahai i jego osobowości. Tym razem, przejdziemy przez jeden rozdział, dostrzegając mityczną astronomię oraz identyfikując symbolikę bohaterów i ich czynów. To będzie trochę jak czytanie rozdziału po zjedzeniu liczących sobie 30 000 lat grzybków należących do jakiegoś jaskiniowca… no, ale nie aż tak, żeby zrobiło się dziwnie czy coś… więc nie macie się czego obawiać… No chyba.

Zasadniczo, chodzi o to: istnieją pewne rozdziały, które są metaforyczne od początku do końca, a teraz, gdy już wprowadziłem większość symboliki Światłonoścy i Długiej Nocy, możemy skupić się na tych rozdziałach i naprawdę dostrzec w nich wszystkie te wisienki na torcie. W tym jak Martin prowadzi metaforyczny pomysł poprzez cały rozdział jest pewna sztuka. Czasem dochodzę do wniosku, że warto skupić się tylko na jednym i podążać za tokiem myślenia autora. Poza tym, od czasu do czasu będziemy odchodzić od próby walki, by zgłębić kilka powiązanych z nią mniejszych tematów, takich jak Ostatni Bohater, miecz Wdowi Płacz, Purpurowe Gody, siateczkę na włosy należącą do Sansy, z zatrutych czarnych ametystów, oraz Daemona II Blackfyre’a, znanego jako John Skrzypek, z trzeciego opowiadania w cyklu o Dunku i Jaju, Tajemniczego rycerza. A przede wszystkim, w samym środku znajdzie się ważny ustęp o Młocie Wód, piorunie boga sztormów i legendzie o Szarym Królu.

Choć zawsze rozmawiamy ogólnie o Długiej Nocy, wydaje się, że pewne rozdziały naprawdę skupiają się na konkretnych aspektach tego kataklizmu. Ten, któremu dziś się przyjrzymy zawiera kilka świetnych wskazówek dotyczących Młota Wód, a – pozwólcie, że się tym z Wami podzielę – moim zdaniem te o Młocie są najlepsze. To fascynujący temat, a metafory są tu równie imponujące. A jeszcze większe wrażenie robi to jak Martin potrafi wziąść tajemnicze wydarzenie z zamierzchłej przeszłości i nie tylko dać nam wskazówki, potrzebne, by rozwikłać tę układankę, ale także zapewnić nam wiele sposobów umożliwajacych wzajemne sprawdzenie i potwierdzenie tych licznych podpowiedzi. To trochę tak, jak gdybyśmy mieli przed sobą jakąś czterowymiarową łamigłowkę, pełną sprytnych metafor i gier słownych. No cóż, sami zobaczycie. Jestem pewien, że nim skończymy ten odcinek, sami będziecie pewni co do tego, że wiecie o co tak mniej więcej chodzi z Młotem Wód.

W przyszłości zrobię znacznie więcej takich ‘recenzji odcinków’ – mam sporo notatek na temat kilku moich ulubionych, więc będę dzielił się moimi pomysłami, gdy uznam, że już przyszła na to pora, albo gdy ktoś w tylnym rzędzie tej ‘auli’ zacznie wrzeszczeć, żebym już to zrobił.

Szkoda, że nie umiem zagrać Freebirda[piosenki zespołu Lynyrd Skynyrdrozpoczynającą się słowami: Gdy odjadę jutro stąd, czy nadal będziesz mnie pamiętać]. No cóż, przynajmniej potrafię zagrać motyw z intro History of Westeros na gitarze basowej. Gdy pisałem ten wstęp po raz pierwszy, umieściłem w nim następujące zdanie: tego typu odcinki skupiające się na jednym rozdziale będą zazwyczaj nieco krótsze i bardziej zwięzłe od tych zwyczajnych, ale teraz, gdy już skończyłem całość… powinienem raczej poprzestać na: będzie bardzo ciekawy i zabawny i pewnie znowu będziemy mieli deszcz księżycowych meteorów, a tak w ogóle, czy wspominałem, że Ametystowa Koala¹, ze swoim pięknym głosem, doskonale nadaje się na narratorkę?

¹ nick, którego używa małżonka LML-a, która czyta fragmenty książek w podcastowej wersji Mitycznej Astronomiii.

Zatem, nim zaczniemy, chcę pokrótce wspomnieć o dwóch scenach, które już dogłębnie przeanalizowaliśmy – ponieważ to właśnie one przygotowały grunt pod symbolikę, którą zobaczymy w scenie próby walki. Pierwszą z nich jest wizja Melisandre, o bezokich czaszkach z oczodołami płaczącymi krwią oraz mroczną i krwawą falą, z Tańca ze smokami, a takżę powiązanej z nią sceną, w której Jon i Mel znajdują ścięte głowy trzech braci Nocnej Straży nadziane na włócznie, po północnej stronie Muru, w pobliżu Czarnego Zamku. Podsumowując:

    • czarna i krwawa fala oraz krew wychodzące z bezokich oczodołów w czaszkach reprezentują motyw księżycowej krwi, a księżycowa krew odnosi się zarówno do ‘powodzi’ krwawiących gwiazd na niebie i wywołanych przez nie powodzi morskiej wody, które powstały gdy jeden lub więcej meteorów wylądowało w oceanie i wywołało tsunami.
    • cała ta krew jest czarna, ponieważ odnosi się do ogólnego motywu ‘przemiany w ogniu’, czyli takiej, jakiej uległ drugi księżyc podczas Długiej Nocy. Melisandre krwawiła czarną krwią, gdy ujrzała tę wizję w płomieniach, a ‘ogień był w niej, udręka i ekstaza, wypełniał ją, palił, przekształcał’.
    • motyw czaszek, ogólnie rzecz biorąc, reprezentuje koncepcję ściętej księżycowej twarzy/głowy, spadającej z nieba, a gdy pojawiają się liczne czaszki, chodzi o wyobrażenie księżycowych meteorów, które pojawiły się podczas Długiej Nocy. Czaszki w wizji płaczą krwią, ponieważ meteory są jak krwawiące gwiazdy (ang. bleeding stars), które zdają się zostawiać za sobą smugę krwi, sprawiają również, że z głebin powstaje krwawa fala, ponieważ rzeczywiste powodzie podczas Długiej Nocy zostały wywołane przez księżycowe meteory. Nie wiem czy to ważne, ale wspomnę, że skała wewnątrz komety lub meteoru jest często nazywana ‘głową’ (ang head).
    • motyw ślepoty/wykucia oczu odnosi się do księżyca płaczącego krwią, albo będącego ‘oślepionym’ – lub do obu jednocześnie. Pomyślcie o Lyannie, płaczącej krwią, albo o łzach ‘płaczącego’ (topiącego się) Muru, które wydawały się Jonowi Snow ‘pasemkami czerwonego ognia i rzekami czarnego lodu’. Możecie również pomyśleć o księżycu jak o oku, które zostaje wykłute.
    • głowy braci Nocnej Straży, które zostają odnalezione później w tym rozdziale, które zostały nabite na włócznie z jesionowego drewna (ang. ashwood), z czarnymi i zakrwawionymi dziurami w miejsce oczu, łączą wszystkie te symbole. Włócznie same w sobie reprezentują komety, a dodatek w postaci nadzianych na nie odciętych głów po prostu umacnia taką symbolikę. Włócznie wykonane z drewna jesionów (ash) tworzą obraz płonącego meteoru, który pozostawia za sobą smugę pyłów (ash – popiół), gdy spada na ziemię, płacząc krwią i płomieniami.

Kolejną sceną o której warto pamiętać gdy będziemy omawiać próbę walki jest coś co lubię nazywać ‘Benerro robi pantomimę teorii Mityczna Astronomia’. Ten fragment po prostu zacytuję, bo próba jego streszczenia zajęłaby więcej miejsca niż sam tekst:

Rycerz przytaknął. – Czerwona świątynia kupuje ich jako dzieci i robi z nich kapłanów albo dziwki i wojowników. Spójrz tam. – Wskazał na stopnie, gdzie linia mężczyzn w ozdobnych zbrojach i pomarańczowych płaszczach stała przed drzwiami świątyni ściskając włócznie o końcówkach przypominających wijące się płomienie. – Ognista Ręka. Święci wojownicy Pana Świata, strażnicy świątyni.
Żołnierze ognia. – Ile palców ma ta ręka ?
– Tysiąc, Nigdy więcej i nigdy mniej. Nowy ogień jest zapalny zawsze gdy poprzedni się wypali.
 
Bennero wskazał palcem na księżyc, zacisnął pięść. Rozłożył szeroko dłonie. Gdy jego głos podniósł się, otworzył dłoń, a płomienie wystrzeliły z jego palców z nagłym świstem powodując okrzyk tłumu. Kapłan potrafił także kreślić w powietrzu ogniste litery. Valyriańskie słowa. Tyrion rozpoznał może dwa z dziesięciu. Jednym była zagłada, a drugim ciemność.
 

Taniec ze Smokami, Tyrion VII

Tym na co chcę zwrócić Waszą uwagę jest fakt, że pięść Benerra reprezentuje księżyc, a gdy otwiera się, w asyście wybuchu ognia, palce symbolizują meteory. Z kolei żołnierze z ‘Ognistej Ręki’ są tu nazwani ‘palacami’ – a w dłoniach trzymają ogniste włócznie. A zatem, zarówno płomienne palce Benerra, jak i płonące włócznie to symbole meteorów. Jak zobaczymy, podczas pojedynku Góry i Żmii włóczni, palców i pięści jest w bród, a wszytkie bazują na symbolice, która została nam przedstawiona w scenie z Benerrem.

Zauważycie, że pięść Benerra staje się ognistą ręką gdy się otwiera i wystrzeliwują z niej płomienne palce. Dzieje się tak, ponieważ zamknięta pięść reprezentuje księżyc przed tym jak ‘pocałował’ słońce, po tym jak zostaje ‘zapłodniony przez ogniste smocze nasienie słońca, eksploduje chmurą płomieni, stając się ognistą dłonią. To odpowiada podaniu o księżycowym pochodzeniu smoków z Qarthu, gdzie księżyc całuje słońce i pęka z powodu gorąca, a wychodzące z niego smoki ‘piją ogień słońca’. Oczywiście, te zapłodnione przez słońce księżycowe meteory reprezentują dzieci słońca i księżyca, czyli Światłonoścę. Podobnie, ‘ognista dłoń’ nie należy ani do słońca ani do księżyca, lecz do obydwu. Dłoń to chwila, gdy słońce ‘ożywia’ księżyc swym ogniem, a płomienne palce wysypują się jak włócznie i smoki. Można chyba stwierdzić, że wszystkie odcięte, spalone i zakrwawione dłonie w Pieśni Lodu i Ognia wpasowują się w ten przewijający się w całej sadze symboliczny motyw.

W porządku, teraz, gdy odświeżyliśmy sobie wszystkie te sprawy, przyszedł czas by zagłebić się w nasz rodział.


Żmija i Góra.

Nawałnica mieczy, Tyrion


Na początek, przyjrzyjmy się dwójce naszych wojowników, zaczynając od Oberyna Martella.

Słoneczny Wąż

Książę Oberyn Martell przybywa ze Słonecznej Włóczni, stolicy Dorne. Na dornijskim godle widnieje czerwone słońce przebite złotą włócznią, więc oczywistym wydaje się powiązanie Oberyna ze słońcem. W rzeczy samej, książę jest w gruncie rzeczy uosobieniem swojego herbu. Nosił ‘wysoki złoty hełm, który miał na czole miedziany dysk, słońce Dorne’, był ubrany w czerwone skórzane rękawice, a w dłoniach trzymał śmiercionośną włócznię. Zbroja Oberyna to po prostu pokazuje nam jeszcze więcej takiej symboliki – tworzą ją błyszczące miedziane płytki, jest również nazywana ‘łuskową, z lśniącej miedzi’. Oczywiście, to naturalne, że wąż jest odziany w zbroję z łusek.

Oberyn jest nazywany ‘Czerwoną Żmiją’, co natychmiast sprawia, że przychodzi nam na myśl czerwona kometa i czerwony miecz zapamiętany jako Światłonośca. Smoki, węże i wije (wyrms) pochodzą z tej samej mitologicznej rodziny, tak w prawdziwym świecie jak i w Pieśni Lodu i Ognia. Na przykład, Daemon Targaryen nazywał swojego czerwonego smoka Krwawą Żmiją (Bloodwyrm), a niektórzy uważają, że smoki zostały wyhodowane z ognistych żmii (firewyrms), jak dowiadujemy się od maestra Yandela w Świecie Lodu i Ognia. Widzieliśmy również jak ‘wężowe’ słownictwo jest używane by opisać smoki. Oberyn Czerwona Żmija bywa czasem nazywany ‘wężęm’ lub ‘Wężem’, zwłaszcza w tym rozdziale. Tyrion rozmyśla:

Wąż pali się do walki. Miejmy nadzieję, że jest jadowity.

… a później:

 Na siedem piekieł, mam nadzieję, że wiesz, co robisz, wężu.

 Ta nasza Czerwona Żmija jest jadowitym piekielnym wężem. Pod koniec pojedynku pojawia się następujące zdanie:

– Jeśli skonasz, nim wypowiesz jej imię, ser, będę cię ścigał przez siedem piekieł – zapowiedział.

Dornijska pustynia jest zapewne, poza piekłem, najgorszym miejscem gdzie można się znaleźć. Jest tam pewne okropne miejsce, zwane Hellholtem (hell – piekło), którym zwykł władać lord Lucifer Dryland, którego Nymeria wysłała w złotych łańcuchach na Mur… sądzę jednak, że te nawiązania do piekła biorą swój początek u Krwawnikowego Cesarza Azora Ahai i jego lucyferiańskich inspiracji. Ten motyw pojawia się również w odniesieniu do smoków i ich zapachu siarki (brimstone, a takżę w kilku fragmentach opisujących innych bohaterów opartych na archetpyie Azora Ahai Odrodzonego, takich jak Stannis. Choćby wówczas, gdy Davos wspomina przerażającą liczbę ofiar Bityw na Czarnym Nurcie:

Utonęli albo spłonęli, razem z moimi synami i tysiącami innych. Poszli walczyć o tron w piekle.

Giermek Oberyna, imieniem Daemon, jest dodatkiem do całej tej diabelskiej symboliki. A nieco później, tuż przed rozpoczęciem walki:

Gdy obaj mężczyźni znaleźli się w odległości dziesięciu jardów od siebie, Czerwona Żmija zatrzymał się nagle.

– Czy powiedzieli ci, kim jestem? – zawołał.

– Jakimś trupem – wystękał ser Gregor w przerwie między oddechami, ani na moment nie zwalniając kroku.

Azor Ahai, chodzący trup – znowu to słyszymy. Sporo rozmawialiśmy na ten temat ostatnim razem, więc teraz nie ma potrzeby się nad tym pochylać, jednak wspomnę, że w istocie, Azor Ahai rzeczywiście był w pewnym momencie umarłym, a może wskrzeszonym. Coś w tym stylu. Innymi słowy, mroczny solarny król jest nocnym, czyli martwym lub nieumarłym słońcem.

Wydaje mi się, że można bez obaw stwierdzić, że Oberyn wpasowuje się w archetyp Azora Ahai/mrocznego solarnego króla, uzbrojonego w jadowitą słoneczną włócznię. Przypomina mi solarne bóstwa z mitologii Azteków oraz innych powiązanych kultur Ameryki Środkowej, które są przedstawiane z żądnymi krwi, wyciągniętymi językami – jest nawet takie zdanie, w którym Oberyn opisuje siebie za młodu: ‘byłem prawdziwym potoworem. Szkoda, że ktoś nie wyciął mi tego obmierzłego języka’. Oczywiście, widzialiśmy, że wyrażenie ‘języki ognia’ bywa używane do opisu deszczu meteorów, więc widzimy tu motyw ognistych pocisków wychodzących od słońca. Włócznie, jęzory, płomienne palce, ręce i miecze, zatrute strzałki i rzutki, smoczy ogień, smocze zęby, które są jak miecze i sztylety – wszystkie tworzą podobny obraz.

Gdy zbierzemy to wszystko razem, dostajemy pewnego rodzaju nikczemnego słonecznego króla, który zniszczył księżyc – rzeczywiście, prawdziwy potwór. Aspekt Oberyna jako ‘Czerwonej Żmii’ wydaje się wyśmienitym symbolem czerwonej komety, którą w micie o Azorze Ahai włada słońce. Na dodatek nawiązuje do motywu zatrucia związanego z krwawnikiem oraz wyobrażenia, że księżyc został otruty i zachorował, ponieważ żmije należą do najbardziej jadowitych węży na świecie. Potomstwo Oberyna jest nawet nazywane ‘piaskowymi wężami’ (sand snakes, w polskiej wersji ‘żmijowe bękarcice’), co dobrze pasuje do koncepcji Azora Ahai jako ojca księżycowych smoków.

Młody Oberyn jest również opisywany jako ‘szybki jak wodny wąż’, przez Dorana, gdy książę wspomina to jak Oberyn zawsze wygrywał zawody urządzane wśród dzieci w Wodnych Ogrodach. To świetne nawiązanie do ‘morskiego smoka’, a wiecie, że zawsze bardzo ekscytuję się wzmiankami o morskich smokach. Pamiętajcie, że to morski smok ‘zatapia całe wyspy’, co wygląda mi na całkiem dokładny opis smoczego meteorytu lądującego w morzu i wywołującego powodzie, zatapiąjące lądy. Za chwilę porozmawiamy o Młocie Wód, a on, z całą pewnością ma coś wspólnego z zatapianiem lądów, i to dość rozległych. Sądzę, że obydwa te legendy to po prostu różne opisy uderzeń księżycowych meteorytów.

We wspomnianym wcześniej rozdziale z Doranem, Obara stwierdza, że ‘Czerwona Żmija z Dorne chodził (w polskim tłumaczeniu jeździł), tam gdzie chciał’. Być może jest to nawiązanie do motywu ‘czerwonego wędrowca’.

Tarcza Oberyna pokazuje nam więcej motywów związanych z krwawnikiem:

Okrągła stalowa tarcza lśniła jasno. Widniały na niej słońce i włócznia z czerwonego złota, żółtego złota, białego złota i miedzi.

Inną nazwą krwawnika jest heliotrop, co znaczy ‘słońce’ + ‘obracać’, ‘obracać słońce’ lub ‘obracać się w stronę słońca’. Istnieje również przyrząd nazywany heliotropem, który robi użytek z luster, by załamywać skupione światło słoneczne. Podczas pojedynku Oberyn rzeczywiście użyje swojej jasnej, wypolerowanej tarczy, by odbić słońce w kluczowym momencie, zupełnie tak jak heliotrop. Innymi słowy, tarcza jest lustrem.

Przypomnijcie sobie teraz całą symbolikę związaną z miedzianą tarczą i słońcem, którą widzielśmy u Drogona i w oczach innych smoków. Jeśli spiczasta broń, taka jak włócznia i miecz może być dobrym symbolem meteorów, to okrągłe lśniące tarcze mogą posłużyć za doskonałe wyobrażenia słoń i księżyców w pełni. Podczas próby walki zobaczymy, że George używa tarcz właśnie w ten sposób.

Skoro mowa o włóczniach i meteorach: wielokrotnie widzieliśmy jak włócznie symbolizują meteory, na przykład w dwóch fragmentach, które przytoczyłem na początku – w rozdziale Mel z odciętymi głowami braci Nocnej Straży nabitymi na jesionowe włócznie, oraz w scenie w czerwonej świątyni, z ognistymi rycerzami R’hlorra, trzymającymi włócznie wyglądające jak wijące się płomienie. Jak widzicie, obraz solarnego bohatera, takiego jak Oberyn, władającego długą włócznią pokazuje nam również słońce, trzymające ogromną czerwoną kometę, morderczynię księżyca. Jeśli czerwona kometa jest włócznią, to z całą pewnością słoneczną,, tak jak ogniste smocze meteory, dzieci słońca i księżyca. Jest takie zdanie o tym, że orężem Dorne są słońce i włócznia, a słońce jest tą groźniejszą. A teraz wyobraźcie sobie słońce, które rzeczywiście ciska w Was włócznie-meteory… No tak… To bardzo złe wieści.


Słoneczna Włócznia

Zostawiając najlepsze na sam koniec, spójrzmy teraz na tą trującą słoneczną włócznię.

– W Dorne lubimy włócznie. Poza tym to jedyna recepta na jego zasięg. Przyjrzyj się uważnie, lordzie Krasnalu, ale nie dotykaj. 

Włócznia była wykonana z toczonego jesionu i miała osiem stóp długości. Jej drzewce było gładkie, grube i ciężkie. Ostatnie dwie stopy oręża stanowiła stal: smukły grot w kształcie liścia zakończony straszliwym kolcem. Brzegi wyglądały na tak ostre, że można by się nimi golić. Gdy Oberyn obrócił w dłoniach drzewce, zalśniło na nich coś czarnego. Smar? Czy trucizna?

Grot włóczni jest pokryty czarną trucizną, która wygląda jak czarny olej (ang. oil, w polskim przekładzie smar). To świetne powiązanie: skojarzenie magicznie toksycznych czarnych oleistych kamieni (oily black stone) z motywem zatrutej słonecznej włóczni. Zaproponowałem, że czarne oleiste kamienie są księżycowymi meteorami, czarnymi krwawnikami, a tutaj widzimy, że stalowy grot słonecznej włóczni jest pokryty cienką warstewką czarnej trucizny, która wygląda jak olej. Całkiem dobra symbolika, co nie? Powiem to jeszcze raz: słoneczna włócznia jest czarnym oleistym ostrzem. Czego więcej można chcieć?

Jednym z motywów kojarzonych z krwawnikiem, który omawialiśmy ostatnim razem, jest jego związek z wysysaniem jadu węży – wydaje się, że George odwrócił to wyobrażenie, tworząc swój własny krwawnik, który jest toksyczny i trujący. Pomyślcie o Asshai i Yeen, gdzie żadne rośliny nie są w stanie wyrosnąć w pobliżu występującego w tych dwóch miejscach ‘śliskiego czarnego kamienia’. Moja teoria na ten temat głosi, że ten czarny oleisty kamień jest albo rudą powstałą z meteorytów, albo kamieniem spalonym na czarno w wyniku uderzeń meteorytów. Komety i meteory, które wchodzą w atmosferę Ziemi przepychają przed sobą falę rozgrzanego powietrza, dość gorącą, by stopić kamień – a istnieje zbyt wiele czarnego kamienia, by cały mógł pochodzić z meteorytów. Zgaduję zatem, że większość powstała w ogromnych pożarach wywowłanych przez uderzenia. Na dodatek, jeśli meteor lub kometa spadnie na skaliste podłoże, sam meteoryt stopi się i wyparuje, stapiając się z podłożem. Nie jestem do końca pewien o co dokładnie tutaj chodzi, ale potrafię z całą pewnością stwierdzić, że możemy zobaczyć te powtarzające się wielokrotnie wskazówki, łączące czarny oleisty kamień z księżycowymi meteorami – a zatem, sądzę, że możemy być pewni, iż istnieje pomiędzy nimi jakiś bliski związek.

Toksyczność czarnego oleistego kamienia wydaje się magiczna w swej naturze, zwłaszcza w Asshai, co bardzo dobrze pasuje do diagnozy Qyburna, który stwierdza, że jad węży na włóczni Oberyna został zagęszczony przy użyciu magii.

Istnieje również inne połączenie pomiędzy Oberynem i czarnym oleistym kamieniem, a jest nim jego opis – ‘wodny wąż’. Jedynym miejscem gdzie w książkach słyszymy o wodnych wężach, przynajmniej z tego co udało mi się znaleźć, jest Fosa Cailin,  a jak widzieliśmy ostatnio, przedmioty znajdujące się w bagnie wokół Fosy symbolizują różne aspekty księżycowych meteorów – kwiaty o nazwie ‘zatrute pocałunki’, jaszczuro-lwy, jadowite wodne węże, a przede wszystkim, porozrzucane w trzęsawisku czarne kamienie, wyglądające na oleiste, leżące jak ‘porzucone zabawki jakiegoś boga’.

Co najważniejsze, czarna, oleista, zatruta przez węża słoneczna włócznia Czerwonej Żmii koniec końców sprawia, że krew Gregora staje się czarna, dokładnie tak jak Światłonośca, który spowodował, żę księżycowa krew stała się czarna, po tym jak przebił serce księżyca. Już wcześniej wspominałem, żę olei lub smar na czarnym kamieniu do sposób w jaki George przedstawia poczerniałą księżycową krew. Oczywiście, nie można brać tego zbyt dosłownie, jednak powstaje tu pewien obraz – śliskie lub oleiste czarne kamienie zostają w jakiś sposób pokryte czarną księżycową krwią, która jest trująca. Pasuje to również do motywu czerwonej komety jako ‘krwawiącej gwiazdy’ (ang. bleeding star), snem Dany w którym jej czarne smocze dziecko jest pokryte jej własną krwią, krwi Nissy Nissy, która pokryła ostrze Światłonoścy, bezokimi czaszkami płaczącymi krwią… i wszystkimi innymi scenami, gdzie księżycowe dziewice krwawiły na kamień, by stworzyć krwawnik. Gregor to żadna dziewica, ale jego krew staje się czarna w wyniku działania symbolu Światłonoścy, a tym symbolem jest włócznia Oberyna, pokryta czarną oleistą trucizną.

A teraz zrobimy sobie przerwę od całej tej tajemnej symboliki, zerkająć na artykuł ze strony internetowej NASA, opowiadający o naturze komet. Przytoczony poniżej fragment pochodzi z artykułu ‘Co jest w sercu komety?’ (ang. What’s in the heart of a comet?). W liście ciekawostek czytamy:

Powierzchnia jest bardzo ciemna, wręcz czarna. Ten materiał o niezwykle ciemnym odcieniu czerni na jej powierzchni jest oparty na węglu i nieco podobny do tej tłustej czarnej brei, która osadza się na naszych grillach. Komety powstają z lodu, krzemianowego pyłu (podobnego do drobnego piasku na plaży) oraz pewnego rodzaju czarnej kosmicznej mazi. 


The surface is very black. The very black material on the surface is carbon-based material similar to the greasy black goo that burns onto your barbecue grill. Comets originally form from ices (mostly water ice), silicate dust (like powdered beach sand), and this type of black space gunk.


To całkiem interesujący koktajl: tłusta (greasy) czarna kosmiczna maź, brudny lód i podstawowe składniki szkła. Oczywiście, nie zapominajmy o skale i żelazie, które również zostały wspomniane w tym artykule, tylko że w innym miejscu. Widzimy tutaj wszystkie elementy składowe, których George używa, by tworzyć różne rodzaje swojej magicznej broni, która ma symbolizować komety. Kometa składa się z lodu i posiada niebieski lub biały lub srebrny ogon, co przywodzi na myśl miecz Świt, a być może również biały miecz wykonany z lodu, a może także lodowy miecz, który płonie bladym płomieniem. Pojawia się tutaj również motyw smoczego szkła – jak przed chwilą wspomniałem, jednym ze skutków ubocznych uderzenia komety mogą być opadające kawałki obsydianu, znane jako tektyty. Przede wszystkim, to, że komety są pokryte ‘tłustą czarną kosmiczną mazią’ daje nam dość dobre wyobrażenie co George mógł mieć na myśli, gdy zdecydował się na to, by jego komety i księżycowe meteory były powiązane z tłustym czarnym kamieniem, bronią pokrytą czarnym olejem, mającą symbolizować Światłonoścę oraz ksieżycowe meteory i tak dalej. Innymi słowy, czerwona kometa, pokazuje nam tłusty czarny kamień i czarny lód płonące czerwonym płomieniem – a dokładnie tak patrzę na Światłonoścę – z tym, że tak naprawdę to mógł być czarny ogień poprzecinany pasemkami czerwonego, by dokładnie odpowiadał temu, którym zioną czarne smoki, Drogon i Balerion – a także rodowemu orężu rodu Targaryenów, którym jest miecz zwany Blackfyre (ang. black + fire, czerń + ogień).

Kończąc temat słonecznej włóczni Oberyna, zwróćmy uwagę na drzewiec, który jest opisany jako toczony jesion (ang. turned ash). Oczywiście, dosłownie chodzi tu o ash wood, drewno jesionu, ale powstaje również obraz ‘toczącego się’ grotu włóczni, ciągnącego za sobą smugę pyłu (również ash), niczym spadający meteor. Motyw ‘smugi pyłu’ (trail of ash) może również odnosić się do opisu miecza Azora Ahai jako ‘rozgrzanego do białości’ (white hot) i ‘dymiącego’ (smoking), który pojawia się tuż przed tym jak wbija ostrze w serce Nissy Nissy.

Zdanie o ‘obracaniu’ (turning) w odniesieniu do włóczni to kolejny element pasujący do krwawnika: obracana jesionowa słoneczna włócznia przywodzi na myśl jedno ze znaczeń słowa heliotrop – ‘obracający słońce’ (sun-turning). W tej scenie zobaczymy całą masę tego obracania, głównie wówczas, gdy Gregor będzie obracał swą twarz do słońca, dokładnie tak jak roślina heliotropiczna. Pamiętacie Klytie, boginię, która rozpaczała przez dziwięć dni z żalu za słońcem, tak, że w końcu zapuściła korzenie i zamieniła w kwiat heliotrop? Nie nazwałbym ser Gregora ‘kwiatkiem’ twarzą w twarz, ale bez względu na to, tak właśnie jest, jak sami zobaczycie.

Jesionowa włócznia Oberyna to bezpośredni odpowiednik jesionowych włóczni, na których znaleziono bezokie głowy braci Nocnej Straży – ta paralela sugeruje, żę czarny oleisty kamień to pewnego rodzaju czarny krwawnik, związany z księżycowymi meteorami. Pokazałem, że wszystkie te włócznie z jesionowego drewna symbolizują meteory (jak prawie wszystko), a odcięte głowy i czarne ostrza to doskonałe reprezentacje ksieżycowych meteorów. A zatem, porównajmy przedmioty na nabite na groty włóczni, ponieważ każdy z nich reprezentuje tę samą rzecz, tylko że w inny sposób. Włócznia Oberyna jest zakończona oleistym czarnym ostrzem ze stali, zaś te odnalezione na północ od Muru głowy członków Nocnej Straży. Istnieje powiedzenie głoszące, iż bracia Nocnej Straży mają ‘czarną krew’, a tutaj, ścięte głowy rzeczywiście mają czarne i zakrwawione otwory w miejsce oczu. We śnie Melisandre płaczą czarną i krwawą falą. Porównując to do zatrutego czarnego oleju na włóczni Oberyna, możecie zauważyć, że czarna krew tych głów i czarny smar ostrza Oberyna to odpowiadające sobie, paralelne, symbole. Jeśli olej na tych niesławnych czarnych oleistych kamieniach mamy rozumieć jako ‘księżycową krew’, to czarna krew i czarny olej powinny być ze sobą zestawiane. I istotnie, w tych scenach rzeczywiście tak się dzieje – obydwie ciecze znajdują się na czubkach ważnych włóczni z jesionu.

Takie samo zestawienie krwi i oleju widzieliśmy w odcinku ‘Fale Nocy i Księżycowej Krwi‘, w scenie księżycowej krwi Sansy, gdzie Starkówna zwinęła prześcieradło, dosłownie pokryte księżycową krwią, w kulkę, po czym wszystko oblała olejem, a następnie spaliła, wypełniając komnatę dymem.

Jedną z głównych hipotez którą postawiłem w tych odcinkach jest to, że Azor Ahai i Krwawnikowy Cesarz byli tą samą osobą. Pokazałem również postaci, takie jak Jon i Daenerys, które zdają się łączyć symbole i działania związane z tą dwójką, jako dowody, że chodzi tu o jedną osobę. Spójrzcie na Oberyna, z całą pewnością solarną postać, którego symbolika związana z czerwoną żmiją i nieumarłymi wiążą go z Azorem Ahai (tak jak fakt zabicia postaci reprezentującej księżyc). Jak właśnie widzieliśmy, posiada również liczne symbole krwawnika: heliotropiczną tarczę-lustro, czarną oleistą słoneczną włócznią oraz dość niebezpośredni związek ‘wodnego węża’ z czarnym oleistym kamieniem. Uznajmy, że Oberyn to kolejny przykład postaci łączącej symbole Azora Ahai i Krwawnikowego Cesarza.

To tyle, jeśli chodzi o Oberyna, mściwego, żądnego krwi słonecznego bohatera, który włada czarną słoneczną włócznią i daje życie wężom. Lecz nim przejdziemy do Góry, Która Jeździ, chcę pokrótce przedstawić trzecią broń z jesionowego drewna, która – moim zdaniem – stanowi paralelę tych, które przed chwilą omówiliśmy. A chodzi tu o halabardę (w oryginale longaxe) Areo Hotaha, jego ‘żonę z jesionu i żelaza’ (ash-and-iron- wife). Jesionowa włócznia Oberyna jest zakończona ostrzem, a te na północ od Muru ścięte głowy… ale ta należąca do Area ma i to i to:

Gdy wreszcie pojawiła się w potrójnym łuku wejścia, Areo Hotah zagrodził jej drogę halabardą. Głownię oręża osadzono na drzewcu z drewna jarzębiny¹, dlugim na sześć stóp, nie mogła go więc przesunąć

(ang. mountain ash, górski jesion, czyli jarzębina)

Zauważyliście to? Ostrze halabardy to głowa (głownia). Ta sama broń pozbawia głowy ser Arysa Oakhearta, rycerza noszącego biały jedwabny płaszcz ‘blady jak światło księżyca’ (as pale as moonlight). Zabijanie księżycowych postaci to właśnie to, czym zajmują się słoneczne włócznie – wydaje się, że halabarda Area zalicza się do tej właśnie kategorii. Ciekawe wydaje się to, że mamy tu ‘górski’ (mountain) jesion, jako że jesionowa włócznia Oberyna zakończy wbita głeboko w klatkę piersiową Góry (The Mountain), a Gregor zostaje ścięty, dokładnie tak jak ser Arys. Za chwilę wrócimy to tego pomysłu.

Światłonośca wypił krew i duszę Nissy Nissy, meteory-Światłonoścy są wykonane z księżyca, a według mojej teorii, Światłonośca-prawdziwy miecz powstał z czarnego księżycowego meteorytu. Te meteory reprezentują Nissę Nissę, księżycową dziewicę, która była żoną słońca. Halabarda Area pasuje to tego motywu – jest nazywana jego ‘żoną z jesionu i żelaza’, a Hotah myśli o niej jak o kobiecie, w nieco przerażający i złowieszczy sposób:

Hotah podszedł do niego, owijając jedną rękę wokół halabardy. Drzewo pod jego dłonią wydawało się gładkie niczym skóra kobiety.

On nawet śpi obok ‘niej’ – jak mówiłem, to trochę dziwne. Później porozmawiamy jeszcze trochę o Arysie i broni z jesionu, ale teraz, jesteśmy już gotowi, by zająć się ser Gregorem z rodu Clegane’ów, ‘Górą, Która Jeździ’.


Kamienny Olbrzym

Martin zawsze przedstawia swoich bohaterów w symboliczny sposób w snach i wizjach, a ponieważ w naszych poszukiwaniach interesuje nas przede wszystkim symbolizm, spojrzymy na to w jaki sposób Gregor pojawia się w wizji. Pomyślcie o Duchu z Wysokiego Serca, która postrzega ludzi w kategoriach ich herbów lub osobistej symboliki, albo o widzeniu Dany w Domu Nieśmiertelnych, z niebieską różą (Jonem Snow), czy też płóciennym smokiem kołyszącym się na tyczkach (Młody Gryf znany również jako fAegon). Tak samo jest z herbami – Martin używa ich, by wzmocnić zestaw symboli odnoszących się do danej postaci lub rodu. Trzecią techniką takiego rozwijania osobistej symboliki jakiegoś bohatera jest rodzaj słownictwa używanego do jego opisu w ‘głównej akcji’ książek. Na przykład, przymiotniki odnoszące się do Melisandre zawsze są ‘ogniste’, niektóre postaci są zawsze nazywane ‘gigantami’, czasem ludzie mają ‘twarz księżyca’ – właśnie o takie epitety chodzi. Spojrzymy na symbolikę Gregora pod tymi właśnie kątami, zaczynając od jego pojawienia się w słnnej wizji. Oto sen Brana, który śni mu się podczas śpiączki w Grze o tron, wizja o trzech cieniach:

Wszędzie, dookoła wszystkich ludzi, widać było cienie. Jeden z nich był czarny jak popiół i miał straszną twarz ogara. Inny nosił złocistą niczym słońce zbroję. Nad obydwoma górował olbrzym w zbroi z kamienia, lecz kiedy uniósł zasłonę hełmu, wewnątrz nie widać było nic poza ciemnością i gęstą czarną krwią.

Dowiedziawszy się już o wszystkich tych sprawach, odczytanie pojawiającej się tu niebiańskiej symboliki nie sprawia problemu. Mamy Jaime’a Lannistera jako słońce, lecz pojawiające się jako cień – to nasz mroczny solarny król, nasze pociemniałe słońce. Jest złoty i piękny, ale to straszliwe piękno, zwłaszcza dla Brana, który widzi złocistą twarz Jaime’a również w swych powtarzających się koszmarach o upadku z wieży.

Drugi cień należy do Ogara. Jest ciemny jak popiół (ash), by pokazać nam czarne meteory w ich postaci ‘piekielnych ogarów’ (hellhounds), ciągnących za sobą smugi popiołu i pyłu, gdy opadają na ziemię – i oczywiście podnoszą jeszcze więcej pyłu, gdy już lądują. To również paralela dla jesionowego (ash) drewna włóczni Oberyna oraz drzewców, na które nabito zakrwawione i bezokie czaszki braci Nocnej Straży – oba te symbole reprezentują płonące księżycowe meteory po których upadku pozostają smugi popiołu. Przypomijcie sobie moment z ostatniego odcinka, gdy omawialiśmy scenę z Sandorem i Sansą w Królewskiej Przystani i gdzie postać ‘piekielnego ogara’ zdawała się stanowić kolejny aspekt Azora Ahai odrodzonego – a ten tytuł może się odnosić albo do ocalałej czerwonej komety albo do czarnych księżycowych meteorów. W szczególności, piekielny ogar zdaje się nawiązywać do samych meteorów, nie komety – ale na ten temat porozmawiamy za chwilę.

W końcu, mamy kamiennego olbrzyma Gregora, trzeci cień z wizji Brana. Jak zobaczycie, pojawiająca się tutaj symbolika Gregora jako kamiennego olbrzyma w stu procentach pasuje do jego symboliki w scenie pojedynku z Oberynem – i w innych miejscach. Najważniejszy jest fragment o zasłonie hełmu, która podnosi się, by ukazać ‘ciemność i gęstą czarną krew’. Ten opis naprawdę przypieczętowuje interpretację kamiennego olbrzyma ze snu Brana jako Gregora, ponieważ Gregor rzeczywiście zostaje ścięty (jego hełm pozostaje pusty i ciemny), a jego krew staje się czarna. Oto pewien fragment z Nawałnicy mieczy, w którym Pycelle przemawia do członków Małej Rady:

– Żyły w jego ramieniu robią się czarne. Kiedy przystawiłem pijawki, wszystkie zdechły.

Oczywiście, mityczni astronomowie bardzo dobrze rozpoznają tę symbolikę: ‘ciemności i gęsta czarna krew’ to po prostu inny sposób powiedzenia ‘fale krwi i nocy’ albo ‘czarna i krwawa fala’. Ciemność i krew przychodzi z księżyca, gdy ten zostaje ścięty, a to wyjawia nam jaką rolę gra Gregor – księżyca.

Widzieliśmy, że ścięcie postaci ‘księżyca’ to dobry sposób na pokazanie księżyca spadającego z nieba, na przykład w przypadku bezokich czaszek z oczodołami płaczącymi krwią w wizji Mel o ‘czarnej i krwawej fali’ – a działa to jeszcze lepiej, gdy ‘księżycową postacią’ jest olbrzym zrobiony z kamienia. Głowa kamiennego olbrzyma reprezentuje księżyc na niebie, a gdy zostaje ścięta, ciemność i czarna krew wypływa z czarnej dziury która po nim pozostaje. Ścięta kamienna głowa staje się nawałnicą kamiennych księżycowych meteorów, czyli piekielnych ogarów, płonących w atmosferze i pozostawiających za sobą smugi pyłu. Słońce zamienia się w słońce-cień, w czasie gdy popioły i dym zakrywają niebo, a nad światem zapada Długa Noc.

Gdy głowa Gregora zostaje przedstawiona Martellom przez zastępcę Arysa Oakhearta, białego rycerza ser Balona Swanna, pojawia się wzmianka o tym, że czaszka lśniąca w świetle świec jest tak biała jak płaszcz ser Balona. Płaszcz Balona ma tą samą barwę co biały płaszcz Arysa Oakhearta, o którym napisano, że był ‘blady jak światło księżyca’ (as pale as moonlight) – mamy zatem motyw czaszki bladej jak księżyc. Nie mogę powstrzymać się od zauważenia, że czaszka Gregora zostaje pokazana w skrzynce wyłożoną czarną tkaniną, co sprawia, że wygląda jak księżyc na niebie, a potem postawiona na kolumnie czarnego marmuru, być może po to, by nawiązać do motywu wieży cienia/czarnej wieży, który analizowaliśmy ostatnim razem – a tylko dlatego, żeby wyglądała na zawieszoną w przestrzeni kosmicznej. Pamiętajcie, że jeśli księżyc lub słońce na niebie jest głową ‘olbrzyma’, to mówimy o olbrzymach o niewidzialnych ciałach – a głowa Góry na czarnej kolumnie daje podobny efekt.

Trzeci cień z wizji Brana jest nazwany ‘olbrzymem w zbroi z kamienia’, a symbolika Gregora jako ‘kamiennego olbrzyma’ jest w gruncie rzeczy wszechobecna. Wiemy, że często bywa nazywany ‘olbrzymem’, a jego przydomek to ‘Góra, Która Jeździ’ – albo po prostu ‘Góra’. Oczywiście, góry to olbrzymy zrobione z kamienia – od czasu do czasu Martin używa słowa ‘olbrzym’, by opisać jakąś górę – a chcąc byśmy dostrzegli cały ten obraz, często opisuje Gregora przy użyciu słownictwa związanego z kamieniem. Poniżej znajduje się dobry przykład, z Gry o tron. Jedna z ocalałych ofiar szału ser Gregora w Dorzeczu opowiada następującą opowieść:

… ten, który ich prowadził, ubrany był jak pozostali, lecz bez wątpienia to był on. Chodzi o jego wzrost, panie. Przecież olbrzymy już wyginęły, nie ma drugiego takiego. Wielki był jak wół, a jego głos dudnił niczym pękająca skała.

Znów, olbrzymy i kamień. Góry są wykonane z kamienia, a góra, która jeździ – która się porusza – tworzy obraz latającego kamienia, a być może spadającej góry. Oczywiście, to trafny opis spadającego kawałka księżyca. Jeśli zetniecie kamiennego olbrzyma, dostaniecie spadającą górę. Pomyślcie jeszcze raz o halabardzie Area Hotaha, z jej głową umieszczoną na drzewcu z górskiego jesionu, ale tym razem pomyślcie o niej jak o ściętej głowie ksieżycowej góry, spadającej z nieba niczym ostrze zostawiające za sobą smugi pyłu i popiołu. Górski popiół… Mountain ash.

Gdy przypomnimy sobie, że Dothrakowie postrzegają gwiazdy jako ogniste rumaki, a Daenerys patrzy na czerwoną kometę jak na płomiennego ogiera Droga, możemy spostrzec, że motyw spadających meteorów jako ‘gór, które jeżdżą’ ma sporo sensu. Można nawet pomyśleć o ‘rumaku, który ujeździ świat’ (the stallion who mounts the world) – czy to też odniesienie do ‘góry, która jeździ’? Większość czytelników uważa, że przepowiednia wskazuje na Dany albo Drogona – lub obydwoje – a oczywiście, Dany to symbol księżyca przemieniającego się w czerwoną kometę, podczas gdy Drogon reprezentuje ksieżyc stający się czarnymi smoczymi meteorytami… w tym sensie, obydwoje są górami, które jeżdżą. Mam kilka pomysłów co do Rumaka, Który Ujeździ Świat, ale wiecie… innym razem.

Gregor został nazwany ‘wielkim jak wół’ przez ocalałego chłopa, a widzieliśmy mnóstwo zabijanych byków symbolizujących księżyc, echa mitu o Mitrze i białym byku. Podczas pojedynku zobaczymy więcej słownictwa związanego z bykami, użytego w odniesieniu do Gregora. Nie sądzę by to był przypadek. Wyobrażenie, że jego głos ‘dudnił jak pękająca skała’ w pewien sposób sugeruje pękający księżyc, a właśnie w ten sposób można dostać spadający kawałek księżyca. Pamiętajcie o tym słuchając jednego z pierwszych cytatów o Gregorze, który pojawia się w rozdziale o próbie walki. Pojawia się w momencie, gdy Tyrion widzi Gregora wchodzącego na arenę:

W zestawieniu z ser Gregorem Cersei wyglądała prawie jak dziecko. Zakuty w zbroję Góra wydawał się wielki ponad ludzką miarę. Pod długą żółtą opończą, ozdobioną trzema czarnymi psami Clegane’ów, miał ciężką zbroję płytową nałożoną na kolczugę. Jej matowoszarą stal pokrywały wgniecenia i zadrapania. Pod zbroją z pewnością miał utwardzaną skórę oraz warstwę wyściółki. Przyłbicę o płaskim szczycie przyśrubowano do naszyjnika zbroi, zostawiając otwory do oddychania obok nosa i ust oraz wąską szparę wzrokową. Szczyt hełmu zdobiła kamienna pięść.

Jeśli nawet ser Gregor ucierpiał od ran, stojący po drugiej stronie dziedzińca Tyrion nie widział żadnych tego oznak. Wygląda jak wykuty ze skały. Potężny miecz, sześć stóp pełnego rys metalu, wbił w ziemię przed sobą. Potężne dłonie ser Gregora, obleczone w stalowe rękawice, były zaciśnięte na gardzie po obu stronach rękojeści.

– Masz zamiar walczyć z tym czymś? – zapytała szeptem Ellaria Sand.

– Mam zamiar zabić to coś – odparł beztrosko jej kochanek.

Gregor jest wykuty ze skały – być może ksieżycowej? Wygląda na to, że pasuje to do jego głosu, o brzmieniu pękającego kamienia – łącząc te dwa opisy, można powiedzieć, że Gregor reprezentuje wykuwany i pękający kamień. Jego stal jest powgniatana i porysowana, co może przywodzić na myśl kratery na księżycu i ogólny motyw poturbowanego, zbombardowanego księżyca. Dodając do tego kamienną pięść, dostajemy sugestię wybuchającego księżyca, zamieniającego się w spadającą górę i pędzącego w dół przez atmosferę, by wylądowąć z łomotem. Zwróćcie uwagę na opis wielkiego miecza Gregora: jest on ‘wbity w ziemię’ (planted in the ground).

Wcześniej w tym rozdziale, Tyrion rozmawia z Oberynem, opowiadając mu jak nienaturalnie dziwny jest ser Gregor:

– Ma prawie osiem stóp wzrostu i waży ze trzydzieści kamieni. W dodatku to same mięśnie. Walczy wielkim dwuręcznym mieczem, ale trzyma go w jednej ręce. Zdarzało się, że przecinał ludzi wpół jednym uderzeniem. Jego zbroja waży tak wiele, że żaden mniejszy mężczyzna nie może jej udźwignąćm nie mówiąc już o poruszaniu się w niej.

Oczywiście, kamień (stone) to brytyjska jednostka wagi, ale George nie używa jej zbyt często, więc jeśli zestawimy ją z innymi wzmiankami o Gregorze ‘zrobionym z kamienia’, nie sądzę, by był to przypadek. Oberyn mówi o zwaleniu Góry z nóg, a dokładnie to dzieje się z księżycem.

Ser Gregor, olbrzymia kamienna góra, która jeździ, gra rolę księżyca, ale sądzę, że możemy określić go jeszcze dokładniej – reprezentuje księżyc, który pęka i zamienia się w różne rzeczy. Gregor to olbrzymi, kamienny księżycowy wojownik, który zamienia się w górę o czarnej krwi, która spada jak kamienna pięść. Jego ścięcie prowadzi do ciemności i fal gęstej czarnej krwi.

Teraz, widzieliśmy zarówno jak solarne i lunarne postaci zmieniają sie w ‘Azora Ahai narodzonego na nowo’, ponieważ odrodzony Azor Ahai jest dzieckiem słońca i księżyca. Nazwanie tych wszystkich postaci ‘Azorami Ahai odrodzonymi’ jest w pewnym sensie poprawne, ale jest również nadmiernym uproszczeniem. Każda taka postać pokazuje nam inny aspekt przejścia, od słońca lub księżyca do księżycowego meteoru. Nie patrzcie na nie wszystkie jak na dokładnie to samo – różnice pomiędzy poszczególnymi bohaterami pokazują nam ważne informacje o księżycowej katastrofie i odrodzonym Azorze Ahai. Przemiana Dany pojazuje w jaki sposób księżyc wydaje na świat smocze meteory i zmienioną czerwoną kometę, podczas gdy transformacja Gregora opowiada nam historię o przeróżnych kataklizmach wywołanych przez pęknięty księżyc, takich jak ciemność, czarna krew, kamienne pięści i spadające góry. Status Gregora jako olbrzyma sugeruje również olbrzymy budzące się z ziemi – czyli trzęsienia ziemi – na ten temat porozmawiamy nieco później.

Choć jest to tak przerażające, niektórzy nadal nie traktują tego dostatecznie poważnie:

Na księciu Oberynie nie zrobiło to większego wrażenia.
– Zabijałem już potężnych ludzi. Sztuczka polega na tym, żeby zwalić ich z nóg. Kiedy padną, jest po nich.

W oryginale: ‘kiedy padną, są martwi’.

To prawda – widzieliśmy, że Światłonośca i księżycowe meteory są często związane ze śmiercią, gdy spadają z nieba, a Azor Ahai odrodzony zdaje sie być martwą lub nieumarłą osobą. Sporo mówiliśmy o tych czaszkach z pustymi oczodołami, reprezentujących księżycowe meteory w wizji Mel i krwawej fali – a oczywiście, czaszka to jasny symbol śmierci. Ale wydaje się również, że ta wizja zapowiada wskrzeszenie Jona Snow, czyli postaci opartej na ‘Azorze Ahai narodzonym na nowo’, w chwili gdy Mel widzi go jako ‘człowieka, potem wilka, i znów człowieka’. W tym słynnym śnie Mel prosi o pokazanie Azora Ahai i widzi ‘tylko śnieg’ (w oryginale ‘only Snow‘, tylko Śnieg, czyli Snow, z wielkiej litery). A zatem znów widzimy jak postać Azora Ahai jest powiązywana z wskrzeszeniem.

Widzieliśmy również jak martwe dzieci reprezentują Światłonoścę, zaczynając od martwego ‘jaszczurzego’ Rhaega, przez cienio-dziecko zabójcę Melisandre, a kończąc na poronieniu Ashary Dayne, które również pasuje do wzoru, ponieważ Ashara ogrywa rolę księżycowej dziewicy, gdy umiera z powodu ‘złamanego serca’ (w wersji angielskiej broken heart, pękniętego serca) i skacze do morza. Przypuszczam, że to dobry moment, by wspomnieć, że w PLIO ‘księżycowa herbata’ (moon tea) to środek aborcyjny. Od dawna zamierzałem zwrócić na to uwagę – sądzę, że pasuje zarówno do księżycowych meteorach i czarnej księżycowej krwi jako w pewnym sensie trujących, jak i do pomysłu, że Azor Ahai odrodzony był w jakimś sensie martwy. Oczywiście, tuż po rozpoczęciu pojedynku Gregor nazywa Czerwoną Żmiję ‘jakiś trupem‘, a sam Gregor zostanie nieumarłym ser Robertem Strongiem, po tym jak Qyburn wyprubuje na nim swoje metody Dr. Frankensteina.

Wspominałem już o tym wcześniej, ale Pieśn Lodu i Ognia jest tak naprawdę o zombie. Tylko przebiera się za historyczną fikcję przyprawioną mroczną fantasy… tak napawdę to znacznie lepsza wersja The Walking Dead. Być może to dlatego zabrało się za nią HBO. Martin powiedział coś w stylu: ‘bez obaw, to tylko wygląda na serię fantasy w stylu tolkienowskim, koniec końców to standardowa opowieść o zombie. Spodoba wam się!’.

Wracając do pomysłu, że Gregor to kamienny olbrzym, który staje się jeżdżącą górą, znaną również jako Azor Ahai odrodzony, spadający księżycowy meteor, warto zauważyć, że Mitra, jedna z głównych inspiracji legendy o Azorze Ahai, jest zrodzony z kamienia. Chodzi tu o jego wizerunki często nazywane ‘z kamienia zrodzonym Mitrą’ (rock-born Mithras), na których wychodzi z kamienia trzymając miecz i pochodnię. George przełożył ten motyw na Azora Ahai odrodzonego będącego meteorem, który wyszedł z księżyca – to z tego powodu Gregor jest ‘zrobiony z kamienia’, ‘wykuty ze skały’ itd. Gregor pokazuje nam przemianę księżyca w latającą skałę, którą znamy jako Azora Ahai narodzonego na nowo i Światłonoścę.

Spójrzcie na ten cytat o ser Gregorze ‘zrodzonym ze skały’ z Gry o tron:

Wydawało się, że oblicze ser Gregora Clegane’a jest wyrzeźbione ze skały. Ogień z kominka obmył je swym pomarańczowym blaskiem, wycinając głębokie cienie w oczodołach.

Zauważcie, co George zrobił z grą światła z kominka: jego skóra jest rosjaśniona przez ogień, tak jak księżyc, który wypił ogień słońca i został spalony przez ciepło – lecz oczy są otworami, skrytymi głeboko w cieniu, co brzmi bardzo podobnie do bezokich czaszek Melisandre i głów o pustych oczodołach. A to oczywiście pasuje do motywu krwawych łez i oślepienia związanych z księżycem. A potem, by umocnić ten pomysł, Gregor słyszy rapory zwiadowcy i rozkazuje, by jeźdźcowi, który nie wykonał swego zadania wykłuć oczy, i tak samo postąpić z kolejnym i kolejnym, aż przyniesie to zamierzony skutek.

Po tym jak Gregor o skrytych w cieniu oczach wydaje polecenie by ludziom wybijać oczy, dostajemy to małe ‘odwracanie słońca’:

Lord Tywin Lannister odwrócił głowę i spojrzał na ser Gregora. Tyrion dostrzegł złocisty błysk, kiedy światło odbiło się w źrenicach ojca, lecz nie potrafił powiedzieć, czy jego spojrzenie wyraża pogardę czy aprobatę.

Zamieściłem ten fragment, by pokazać spójność w używaniu oczu jako symboli w tej scenie – złote oczy Tywina lśnią, co kontrastuje z pustymi, zacienionymi oczyma Gregora. Pokazuje jak George może sterować różnymi rzeczami, tak jak chce, by stworzyć symbolikę na jaką ma ochotę. Dwóch ludzi stoi w tym samym pokoju przy ogniu, ale oczy jednego zdają się lśnić światłem, podczas gdy oczu drugiego nie widać z powodu cienia. Dlaczego? Bo tego domaga się symbolika, więc tak jest.


Wieża Ręki


Tytuł najważniejszego po królu dostojnika w Siedmiu Królestwach Westeros, który po polsku został przetłumaczony jako Namiestnik, w oryginale brzmi The Hand of the King, czyli dosłownie Ręka Króla. W ‘Pieśni Lodu i Ognia’ wielokrotnie pojawia się gra słów związana z podwójnym znaczeniem tej godności, na przykład gdy ser Davos Seaworth przedstawia się jako ‘Lord Deszczowego Lasu, admirał Wąskiego Morza, królewski namiestnik‘, podczas audiencji na Dworze Trytona w Białym Porcie, lady Leona Woolfield odpowiada: ‘Admirał bez okrętów, namiestnik bez palców, służacy królowi bez tronu. Czy to rycerz stoi przed nami, czy odpowiedź na dziecinną zagadkę?’

W wersji angielskiej rozmowa prezentuje się następująco: ‘Ręka Króla’ – ‘Ręka bez palców’.

Namiestnik urzęduje w miejscu nazywanym Wieżą Namiestnika, The Tower of the Handczyli dosłownie Wieży Ręki.


Poruszająca się lub jeżdżąca góra sama w sobie jest dobrym sposobem na opisanie dużego meteorytu, ale kamienna pięść na hełmie Ser Gregora całkowicie rozstrzyga sprawę. Przypomnijcie sobie jak Benerro używał swojej pięści jako symbolu księżyca, gdy otworzyła się z wybuchem płomieni, by stać się ognistą ręką boga, ciskającą czarnymi meteorami niczym płonącymi włóczniami, szerzącymi zagładę i ciemność. A zatem, kamienna pięść Gregora jest całkowicie spójna z jego statusem jako jeżdżącej Góry i księżycowego wojownika. Później, podczas próby walki, zobaczymy, że rzeczywiste ręce Gregora są używane na różne interesujące sposoby, by dodawać do obrazowości księżycowego meteoru/pięści. A mówiąc ‘interesujące’ mam na myśli ‘okropnie brutalne, lecz symbolicznie ważne’.

Oberyn, nasz solarny bohater, posiada odpowiadający symbol: swoje czerwone rękawice, które przywodzą na myśl zakrwawione dłonie. Dlaczego solarna i lunarna postać współdzielą tę symbolikę ognistych i krwawych rąk? Najłatwiej można to sobie zobrazować w następujący sposób: wyobraźcie sobie księżyc jako pacynkę w kształcie dłoni wykonaną ze skarpety. Gdy słońce staje za księżycem i wbija swoją ognistą dłoń w, nazwijmy to, ‘dziurę’ tej pacynki, kukiełka zostaje ‘ożywiona’ przez ogień i staje się ‘płomienną ręką’. Jeśli słońce jest królem, eksplodujący księżyc może być postrzegany jako Ręka Króla, która trzyma Światłonoścę lub JEST Światłonoścą. Naturalnie, to powinna być krwawa i/lub płonąca ręka, tak jak czerwone rękawice Oberyna, poparzona dłoń Jona, od czasu do czasu ręce zbroczone krwią, odcięta dłoń Jaime’a, odcięte palce Davosa, płomienna dłoń Benerra, Timmet syn Timmeta, który jest Czerwoną Ręką Spalonych Ludzi z Gór Księżycowych (The Mountains of the Moon), pięciopalczaste liście czardrzew, które są niekiedy opisywane jako przypominające zakrwawione dłonie lub płomienie – rozumiecie o co chodzi. Księżyc staje się orężem gniewu solarnego króla, czyli może być jego ręką lub mieczem, albo czarną żelazną różą, i tak dalej i tak dalej…

Gregor pokazuje nam księżyc zamieniający się w spadające obiekty, takie jak jeżdżące góry i kamienne pięści, a właśnie to przedstawia symbol otwierającej się ognistej dłoni. Jedyne czego brakuje kamiennej pięści-Gregorowi to trochę picia ognia słońca i przebicia słoneczną włócznią , że się tak wyrażę, a oczywiście, dokładnie to go czeka.

Bardzo dobrze znamy wyobrażenie, że szczyty wież, gór i ludzi mogą symbolizować ciała niebieskie, więc pomyślcie o tym, że ‘Ręka Króla’ (Namiestnik) zasiada wysoko w Wieży Ręki, tak jak kamienna pięść Gregora znajduje się na jego głowie. Daleko na południu, rządzący Książę Dorne zajmuje ‘Wieżę Słońca’ (The Tower of the Sun), a Oberyn ma na swojej przyłbicy słońce. To prawie tak jak gdyby wszyscy przykleili sobie na głowach wizytówki, coś w stylu tych głupich naklejek ‘Część, nazywam się _____’. ‘Część, nazywam się słoneczny wąż’‘Cześć, nazywam się olbrzym księżycowa kamienna pięść’. Kamienna pięść, która jest ognistą ręką króla, schodzi z niebios, które mogą być przedstawione jako szczyt wieży, góry lub jakiejś osoby. W tym przypadku chodzi o ‘szczyt’ gościa zwanego ‘Górą’, którego hełm o spłaszczonym wierzchołku, który wygląda jak wieża.

George umieszcza nawet Wieżę Ręki (Namiestnika) pomiędzy naszą dwójką wojowników, niczym pewnego rodzaju symboliczną przypominajkę:

Przed Wieżą Namiestnika, w połowie drogi między obydwoma przeciwnikami, zbudowano podwyższenie, na którym zasiadał lord Tywin ze swym bratem, ser Kevanem.

Wieża Ręki to symbol księżyca, więc stosownie, tuż obok niej mamy solarną wieżę, w której zasiada Tywin Lew. To tworzy coś na kształt zaćmienia – wieża słońca tuż obok ksieżycowej (zgaduję, że to zależy od tego gdzie ktoś stoi). Powinniśmy widzieć oznaki zaćmienia, ponieważ pojedynek będzie się toczył pomiędzy słońcem i księżycem. I rzeczywiście, będziemy je widzieć, sądzę również, że powyższa scena jest pierwszą z nich. Pojawia się również wzmianka o tym, że słońce skryło się za chmurami, a dzień jest szary.

Kontynuując ten temat, Wieża Ręki, symbol księżyca i księżycowej pięści, ostatecznie zostaje spalona i spektakularnie zawala się. Pomyślcie o innych upadłych księżycowych wieżach, takich jak ‘wieże na brzegu morza’ Melisandre, Wieża Dzieci w Fosie Cailin, czy też o Wieży Radości. Spalenie Wieży Namiestnika to scena przepełniona symboliką, więc zapewne wrócimy do niej innym razem – świetnie nadaje się na ‘recenzję rozdziału’. Tymczasem, zadowolę się zwróceniem uwagi na ścisły związek pomiędzy Wieżą Ręki i hełmem Gregora z jego kamienną pięścią, oraz zwięzłym wprowadzeniem motywu Ręki Króla grającą rolę księżyca w stosunku do słońca, czyli króla.

Jak przed chwilą wspomniałem, symbol ‘ognistej ręki’ pojawia się gdy słońce ‘ożywia’ księżyc-pięść swym ogniem. Innymi słowy, ognista ręka to dziecko słońca i ksieżyca, tak jak Światłonośca. I tak jak zarówno solarne jak i lunarne postaci mogą pokazywać nam symbolikę ognistej lub krwawej ręki, zarówno słoneczni i księżycowi ludzie mogą przemieniać się w ‘Azora Ahai odrodzonego’, jak już widzieliśmy.

Ponadto, i z dokładnie tych samych powodów, i solarni i lunarni wojownicy mogą władać Światłonoścami. Najważniejsze jest zrozummienie, że Światłonośca to dziecko słońca i ksieżyca, a zatem może być przedstawiany w ręku obojga. Stosownie, podczas próby walki zarówno nasz solarny wojownik, jak i lunarny, będą władać Światłonoścą, co za chwilę zobaczymy. Oberyn ma swoją słoneczną włócznię, podczas gdy wielki miecz długi Gregora jest dwukrotnie opisywany jako ‘migający, błyskający’ (flashing) podczas pojedynku.

Patrząc na to z humanistycznego punktu widzenia, mówiąc ogólnie o mitycznej astronomii, mamy na myśli ludzi patrzących w niebo, na niebiańskie wydarzenia, i wymyślających kreatywne alegoryczne sposoby na opisanie tego co ujrzeli. Innymi słowy, skoro eksplozję księżyca poprzedzało zaćmienie, z księżycem znajdującym się ‘przed’ słońcem, można sobie wybrać ‘kogo’ uzna się za dierżącego miecz-kometę. Można zdecydować się na przedstawienie tej całej sprawy jako bitwę pomiędzy słońcem i księżycem, można również wyobrazić sobie to jako zbliżenie dwóch kochanków. Kometa może wyglądać jak miecz, włócznia lub ogon smoka, w zależności od danej kultury. Może nawet wyglądać jak sperma zapładniająca jajo-księżyc. To właśnie sprawia, że wszystkie mity które tu omawiamy są tak zabawne – na ile różnych sposób George potrafi opisać to jedno wydarzenie i usnuć na ich podstawie legendy i podania? Odpowiedź na to pytanie brzmi: na strasznie wiele sposób.

Niektóre sceny pokazują nam całkiem jasną symbolikę: Drogo jest słońcem, Dany jest księżycem, a gdy księżyc zbliża się zbyt blisko słońca, wykluwają się smoki. Świetnie. Ale innym razem, tak jak w przypadku pojedynku pomiędzy Oberynem i Gregorem, znaczenie nie jest tak oczywiste. Oto co musicie zrozumieć: George nie patrzy na poszczególne elementy – słońce, kometę, księzyc, ksieżycowe meteory-dzieci – i dzieli je pomiędzy Oberynem i Gregorem, jakby wyierał sobie graczy do drużyny. ‘Ty bierzesz słońce i kometę, a on dostaje ksieżyc i księżycowe meteory’ – nie, to tak nie działa. Każda postać może używać wszystkich tych przedmiotów. Do każdej postaci podchodzi oddzielnie – to z tego powodu i Oberyn i Gregor mogą używać broni symbolizującej Światłonoścę, a każdy z nich pokazuje nam symbol ognistej lub krwawej ręki. Nawet jeśli sam Gregor reprezentuje drugi księżyc, tarcza Oberyna – słoneczne lustro – również może wyobrażać drugi księżyc. Jeśli się nad tym zastanowić, w pewnym sensie musi tak być – jeśli obie bronie w tej walce symbolizują kometę-Światłonoścę, obie tarcze muszą reprezentować księżyc, ponieważ Światłonośca w niego uderza. Tarcza Oberyna pokazuje nam heliotropiczny, związany z piciem słońca, aspekt drugiego ksieżyca, zaś tarcza Gregora pokazuje nam coś całkowicie innego, coś o czym za chwilę porozmawiamy.

Innymi słowy: gdy George tworzy symbolikę Oberyna, może dowolnie używać wszystkich niebiańskich puzzli. Drugi księżyc – lustro słońca – stoi przed słońcem, by stworzyć zaćmienie, co łatwo można sobie wyobrazić jako słońce trzymające przed sobą księżyc-tarczę, z kometą jako włócznią. Postrzeganie księżyca jako tarczy słońca to dokładnie to samo co patrzenie na niego jak na ognistą rękę słońca, lub oręż słońca.

Co do tej ognistej ręki króla, by stała sie spadającą pięścią lub deszczem stalowych palców, dłoń musi zostać odcięta. Myślicie o dłoni Jaime’a? Tak, z całą pewnością macie rację, ale spójrzcie na ten cytat Jaime’a o Aerysie i Królewskich Rękach, które mu służyły:

Jednakże Obłąkany Król co chwila odrąbywał własne ręce. Lorda Jona odrąbał po bitwie dzwonów. Pozbawił go tytułów, ziem oraz majątku i wygnał za wąskie morze, gdzie lord Jon wkrótce zapił się na śmierć.

To Jon Connington, ‘Gryf Odrodzony’, który – jak się okazuje – ‘jest niezupełnie martwy’. Jako odrodzony czerwony gryf z ognistymi czerwonymi włosami, jest świetną ognistą dłonią do odcięcia. Król zawsze odcina swoje ręce.

A teraz, czas na trochę nocnikowego humoru związanego z kometą. Wiecie, że gdy król je, ręka (namiestnik) zbiera gówno? No cóż, niejedna starożytna kultura postrzegała komety i spadające gwiazdy jako odchodzy gwiazd. Innymi słowy… jeśli ksieżyc jest ręką króla, można powiedzieć, że przyczyną Długiej Nocy była ręka zbierająca olbrzymie królewskie gwiazdo-odchody. Jak chcecie, możecie też sobie trochę zabrać. Przypomina się Tywin, ognista Ręka Króla, o którego nieprzyjemnym odorze wielokrotnie wspominano.


Ogary z Piekieł

Wracając do symboli Gregora, musimy przyjrzeć się jego herbowi: trzem czarnym psom na złotym polu. A to oznacza, że czas porozmawiać o Cerberze, trójgłowym piekielnym ogarze z mitologii greckiej i temu w jaki sposób odnosi się do motywu trójgłowego smoka. Motyw smoka o trzech głowach, który odnajdujmy zarówno na herbie rodu Targaryenów, jak i w enigmatycznej przepowiedni o smoczych jeźdźcach, wydaje się pewnego rodzaju skrzyżowaniem Cerbera z Hydrą, siedmiogłowym morskim smokiem, również z mitów greckich. Cerber to najdoskonalszy ‘piekielny ogar’ (hellhound) – jest nazywany Ogarem Hadesa (The Hound of Hades), ponieważ strzeże wejścia do podziemi i powstrzymuje umarłych przed ich opuszczeniem. Jak mówiliśmy, jednym ze znaczeń wyrażenia ‘trzy głowy ma smok’ mogą być trzy duże księżycowe meteory, które uderzyły w Planetos. Być może to jeden z nich wybuchł na niebie, by uwolnić deszcz tysiąca smoczych meteorów. A to oczywiście odpowiadałoby trzem smokim, które Daenerys wykłuła podczas alchemicznych godów.

Tak więc, odczytuję to w następujący sposób: trzy czarne psy reprezentują trzy smocze meteory, które przybyły z księżyca – a to po prostu inny sposób powiedzenia, że motyw piekielnego ogara odnosi się do Azora Ahai narodzonego na nowo, lecącego meteoru. Złote pole, stanowiące tło herbu Clegane’ów, prawdopodobnie symbolizuje słońce, które znajdowało się za eksplodującym księżycem. I znów mamy zaćmienie. To bardzo podobne do herbu Blackfyre’ów, trójgłowego czarnego smoka na czerwieni. Zarówno czerwień jak i złoto pasują do słońca – i obie te barwy zazwyczaj widzimy u naszych solarnych postaci. Azor Ahai odrodzony jest powiązany z czerwienią i motywem czerwonego słońca – a podczas zaćmienia pierścień słońca na niebie zwykle wydaje się czerwony.

Taką interpretację umacnia to, że Gregor zamalował swoje ‘trzy czarne psy na żółtym’ na tarczy siedmioramienną gwiazdą. Podczas walki, farba zostaje zdarta i ‘spod gwiazdy wygląda psi łeb’, tworząc obraz gwiazdy, która pęka, by uwolnić trzy czarne drapieżniki (psy zamiast smoków). Tarcza Gregora opowiada historię Długiej Nocy – twarz ‘gwiazdy’ księżyca zostaje zadrapana przez słoneczną włócznię, a wówczas ukazują się trzy piekielne ogary, czarne psy o ognistych oczach. Całkiem sprytne. I znów, jeśli słuchacie lub czytacie ten podcast, to właśnie dla takich chwil. Jednym z powodów dla których piszę i nagrywam Mityczną Astronomię jest to, że rzeczy które George zrobił z symboliką i mitologią są po prostu zbyt mądre, bym się tym z Wami nie dzielił.

Gdy brat Gregora, ‘Ogar’ Sandor Clegane walczy w pojednku z pozorantem Azora Ahai, Berikiem Dondarrionem, trzy czarne psy na jego tarczy stają w płomieniach i odcięte z powierzchni drewna przez płonący miecz Berica – sądzę, że to dokładnie ta sama symbolika. W pewnym momencie tej walki Arya krzyczy ‘idź to piekła, Ogarze!‘. (you go to hell, Hound!). To sprytna gra słów (hell, Hound – hellhound) – i bezpośrednie nawiązanie do Cerbera, ognistego piekielnego ogara o trzech głowach. Tworzy również paralelę pomiędzy włócznią Oberyna, która odkrywa psy na tarczy Gregora i płonącym mieczem Berica, który odcina psy Sandora. To ma głęboki sens, jeśli oleista czarna włócznia Oberyna ma służyć jako symbol Światłonoścy, tak jak sugerowałem. W języku mitów, powiedzielibyśmy po prostu, że płonący miecz słońca tak naprawdę jest oleistą czarną włócznią. Kiedyś przeanalizujemy całą tę scenę, bo dzieje się w niej sporo: pojawia się płonący miecz, który pęka wpół, czarna krew i jedno z wielu wskrzeszeń Berica. To kolejny priorytet na liście kandydatów do mityczno-astronomicznej recenzji rozdziału.

Ostatnim razem widzieliśmy jak Ogar przybrał postać piekielnego ogara w scenie księżycowej krwi Sansy w Królewskiej Przystani. W tamtym rozdziale piekielny ogar Sandor grał rolę Azora Ahai odrodzonego: był spalony, pokryty krwią, ‘przemieniony’ i miał świecące ogniste ślepia psa. To pasuje do wniosków do jakich przed chwilą doszliśmy: piekielny ogar to jeden z aspektów narodzonego na nowo Azora Ahai, odnoszący się do czarnych księżycowych meteorów. Inną ciekawą scenę z piekielnymi ogarami widzimy w Starciu królów, gdy Theon na krótko okupuje Winterfell. Śni mu się dobrze zasłużony koszmar o wilkorach Brana i Rickona z ludzkimi głowami, z których ust kapie czarna krew, goniących go przez nieprzyjazny las:

Litości – łkał. Za sobą usłyszał przerażające wycie, które zmroziło mu krew w żyłach. Litości, litości. Gdy zerknął za siebie, ujrzał ścigające go wielkie jak konie wilki z głowami małych dzieci. Och, litości, litości. Z ich ust skapywała czarna jak smoła krew, która wypalała dziury w śniegu. Z każdym krokiem były coraz bliżej. Spróbował przyspieszyć kroku, lecz nogi odmówiły mu posłuszeństwa. Wszystkie drzewa miały twarze i śmiały się z niego. Znowu rozległo się wycie. Czuł woń gorących oddechów ścigających go bestii, smród siarki i zepsucia. Oni nie żyją, nie żyją, widziałem jak zginęli – chciał krzyknąć. Widziałem ich głowy zanurzone w smole.

Wiemy co oznacza czarna krew – ognistą przemianę księżyca w czarne krwawnikowe meteory, które reprezentują Azora Ahai odrodzonego. Wilkory piekielne ogary są w tej scenie duże jak konie, czyli inny ważny symbol meteorów, a ich opis brzmi bardzo podobnie do opisu smoka – płonąca czarna krew pozostawia dymiące dziury w miejscach gdzie spada, tak jak płonąca czarna krew Drogona na Arenie Daznaka. Wilkory nawet pachną jak smoki, siarką. Wszystkie wymienione tu sceny zdają się ze sobą zgadzać – ogólnie pojęte ‘piekielne ogary’, a dzikie psy rodu Clegane’ów w szczególności, są związane z ogniem i mogą być użyte jako symbole czarnych księżycowych meteorów i Azora Ahai odrodzonego. A zatem, to że gwiazda na tarczy Gregora odsłania trzy czarne psy ma głęboki sens – to całkiem szczegółowa mityczna astronomia.

Wracając do Gregora, zwróćmy uwagę na to, że jest znany jako jeden z ‘psów Tywina’, razem z Amorym Lorchem i Vargo Hoatem, z powodu grabieży, napaści i podpaleń jakich dokonuje na rozkaz lorda Tywina. A to jest spójne z wyobrażeniem, że Tywin to słońce, a Gregor jest jego orężem, meteorytem powstałym z księżyca. Podoba mi się to, że Tywin ma trzy psy – tak trzy psy na herbie Clegane’ów i trójgłowy Cerber, pasuje to do teorii o trzech uderzeniach księżycowych meteorów i motywu trzech głów smoka. Na dodatek stawia solarnego króla w roli Hadesa, króla piekieł, a to doskonale pasuje do tego w jaki sposób patrzymy teraz na Azora Ahai, króla piekieł na ziemi, władcy nocnych krain, ziemskiego reprezentanta Lwa Nocy. Ciekawe jest to, że Hades jest znany z uprowadzenia księżycowej dziewicy, Persefony. Król Podziemi, który porywa księżycowe dziewice i ma na swe rozkazy piekielne ogary wygląda na coś, z czym mógłby pracować Martin. Widzimy jak rozwija niektóre z tych motywów, na przykład sprawiając, że jego własny władca nocy, Azor Ahai odrodzony, uprowadza księżycową dziewicę i ustanawiając piekielnego ogara jednym z aspektów Azora Ahai odrodzonego na nowo, czyli ksieżycowego meteoru. Więcej o Persefonie porozmawiamy gdy wrócimy do tematu księżycowych dziewic, których porwanie uniemożliwia nadejście wiosny – to motyw dość powszechny w mitologiach naszego świata, a Martin bez przeszkód włączył go do swoich mitów o Długiej Nocy. Długa Noc to opowieść o odrodzonym królu zaświatów i o uprowadzoniu księżyca, które sprawia, że zima trwa bez końca.

By być dokładnym, powinienem zauważyć, że grecki świat podziemny to nie to samo co ‘piekło’ w religii chrześcijańskiej, ale raczej ‘zaświaty’ typowe dla religii politeistycznych. Wspomnę również, że moja przyjaciółka, również bloggerka, Sweetsunray, jest autorką serii świetnych esejów o Hadesie i Persefonie oraz ich powiązaniach z Eddardem i Lyanną Stark, a także o kryptach Winterfell jako chtoniczym (podziemnym) świecie. Wszystko znajdziecie na jej niesamowitym blogu, Mythological Weave of Ice and Fire (Mitologicznym Splocie Lodu i Ognia). Jej teksty należą to moich ulubionych esejów o Pieśni Lodu i Ognia, więc serdecznie je polecam, jeśli chcecie przeczytać więcej doskonałej analizy na ten temat.


Walka

W porządku, dość wyczerpująco przygotowaliśmy grunt pod naszą walkę. Oberyn to władające włócznią słońce, podczas gdy Gregor to gwiazda-księżyc, która zamienia się w kamienną pięść – to jasne. Zapewne zastanawiacie się czy kiedykolwiek naprawdę porozmawiamy o tym całym pojedynku. Przygotujcie się na grzmoty!

Dornijczyk odsunął się na bok.

– Jestem Oberyn Martell, książę Dorne – oznajmił, gdy Góra obrócił się, by nie stracić go z oczu. – Księżna Elia była moją siostrą.

– Kto taki? – zapytał Gregor Clegane.

Oberyn uderzył długą włócznią, lecz ser Gregor odbił cios tarczą, odepchnął włócznię na bok i runął na księcia, wymachując ogromnym mieczem.

Właśnie tutaj zaczyna się ‘obracanie w słońcu’ Gregora, które będzie się przewijało podczas całej walki. Widzimy jak w odniesieniu do Clegane’a pojawia się nawiązanie do byka (ang. bull) – w oryginalnym opisie Gregor naciera na Czerwoną Żmiję jak byk:

“Who?” asked Gregor Clegane. Oberyn’s long spear jabbed, but Ser Gregor took the point on his shield, shoved it aside, and bulled back at the prince, his great sword flashing.

Wkrótce zobaczymy więcej takich odniesień. Miecz Gregora miga jak błyskawica, co sprawia, że staje się mieczem światła, a może nawet błyskawicą, taką jak piorun Boga Sztormów w micie o Szarym Królu.

Długa włócznia prześlizgiwała się nad jego mieczem, śmigała niczym wężowy język, pozorując atak nisko, by uderzyć wysoko, dźgała w pachwinę, tarczę, oczy. Dobrze przynajmniej, że Góra to wielki cel – pomyślał Tyrion. Książę Oberyn raczej nie mógł chybić, choć żaden z jego ciosów nie był w stanie przebić masywnej zbroi ser Gregora. Dornijczyk krążył wokół niego, uderzał włócznią i odskakiwał, zmuszając większego przeciwnika do kręcenia się w kółko. Clegane traci go z oczu. Hełm Góry miał wąską szczelinę, co znacznie ograniczało jego pole widzenia. Oberyn zręcznie wykorzystywał ten fakt, podobnie jak swą szybkość i długość włóczni.

Walka toczyła się w ten sposób przez dość długi czas. Przeciwnicy przemieszczali się w przód i w tył albo krążyli wokół siebie po spirali. Miecz ser Gregora przecinał powietrze, a włócznia Oberyna trafiła Górę w ramię, w nogę i dwa raz w skroń. Wielka drewniana tarcza ser Gregora również oberwała wielokrotnie. W jednym miejscu spod siedmioramiennej gwiazdy wyglądał psi łeb, w innym zaś widać było nagą dębinę.

Oberyn i Gregor zachowują się tutaj jak orbitujące ciała niebieskie, poruszające się dookoła po spiralach. Oberyn krąży, tak jak słońce wydaje się krążyć na niebie, podczas gdy Gregor obraca się raz, a potem znowu, tworząc obraz księżyca obracającego się wokół własnej osi. Oczywiście, obraca się, by podążać za słońcem – jest obracającym się za słońcem heliotropem, jak bogini Klytie i kwiat heliotrop. Widzimy również, że psi łeb wyłania się zza gwiazdy, gdy tarcza zostaje zadrapana przez włócznię Oberyna – odnosiłem się do tego wcześniej, wyjaśniając, że mamy tu opowieść o trójgłowym potworze wyłaniającym się ze zniszczonego księżyca. Znów pojawia się motyw ślepoty – Gregor traci Oberyna z oczu, a jego pole widzenia jest poważnie ograniczone.

Widzimy również bezpośrednie powiązanie pomiędzy włócznią i językiem węża, utwierdzające to że sami powiązaliśmy wcześniej te dwa symbole. Przypomina mi się śmierć Kąsacza z Uczty dla wron, gdzie Gendry od tyłu wbija miecz w jego gardło, a Brienne widzi jak jego język, podobny do wężowego, staje się zakrwawionym mieczem:

Kąsacz odrzucił głowę do tyłu, znowu otworzył usta i zawył, wysuwając język – ostro zakończony i ociekający krwią. Był dłuższy, niż ludzki język miał prawo być. Sterczał z jego ust, czerwony, mokry i lśniący. Obrzydliwy. Ma język długi na stopę – pomyślała Brienne, nim ogarnęła ją ciemność. Wygląda prawie jak miecz.

Brienne to kolejna postać o bogatej symbolice, którą rozłożymy na czynniki pierwsze innym razem (być może ‘rozłożymy’ to nieodpowiednie słowo, biorąc pod uwagę, że Kąsacz pożerał w tej scenie jej twarz). W każdym razie, Brienne jest co najmniej dziewicą, którą ogarnia ciemność, a tuż przed tym widzi obrzydliwy i obsceniczny krwawy miecz. To dlatego Jaime i inne postaci wciąż nazywają ją krową – to nawiązanie do krów i byków jako składanych w ofierze symboli księżyca. I znów, widzimy znajome wskazówki, że Światłonośca, krwawy miecz, był czymś obrzydliwym, a nawet zniewagą dla bogów. Jest dłuższy niż jakikolwiek język ma prawo być, tak jak Góra był ‘wyższy niż jakikolwiek człowiek miał prawo być’. Krwawnikowy Cesarz Azor Ahai, twórca Światłonoścy, rzucił wyzwanie bogom i kradł z niebios. Rozłupał księżyc, spowodowął Długą Noc, praktykował mroczne sztuki, parał się torturami i nekromancją… i tak dalej i tak dalej… znacie całą kartotekę. Każdy raz gdy widzimy tego rodzaju powiązania Światłonoścy lub Azora Ahai jedynie umacnia nasz wniosek, iż był on naprawdę złym gościem z naprawdę złym mieczem, który sprzeciwił się bogom.

Co ciekawe, ostatecznie okazuje się, że ten krwawy miecz wcale nie był mieczem – gdy słyszymy słowa Thorosa później w Uczcie dla wron:

 – Nie żyje. Gendry wbił mu włócznię w kark.

Jak możemy zobaczyć, krwawe miecze, krwawe włócznie i krwawe języki są mniej więcej zamienne.

Wracając do pojedynku Góry i Żmii, widzimy Gregora krzyczącego by Oberyn ‘zamknął tę cholerną gębę’ (gra słów, użyte tu bloody oznacza zarówno krwawy (dosłownie) oraz cholerny, wcześniej w Nawałnicy mieczy Ogar nazywa wesele wuja Aryi cholernym, nieświadomie zapowiadając Krwawe Gody), co stanowi kontynuację tego typu symboliki. Gdy Gregor traci panowanie nad sobą, Tyrion zauważa, że on nie używa słow, po prostu ryczy jak zwierzę, co oczywiście przywodzi na myśl ryczącego smoka. Jest to również sugestia, że Gregor nie potrafi mówić, która staje się prawdziwa, gdy Góra zostaje wskrzeszony jako ser Robert Strong. Słońca i księżyce, tracące języki i wypluwające różne rzeczy, dławiące i duszące się, mające poderżnięte gardła… sądzę, że to właśnie ten motyw. Z całą pewnością pojawia się dość często, potrzeba więc głębszych badań, by stwierdzić co George chce nam powiedzieć przez te całe milczenie i ciszę. Rozumiem motyw słońca wypluwającego ogniste meteory i rytualanego podcięcia gardła, ale czuję, że chodzi tu o coś więcej. Wiele postaci kończy z poderżniętym gardłem albo w jakiś sposób traci zdolność mowy. Wracając do walki, mamy cios w gardło, który powoduje głośny zgrzyt:

– Zgwałciłeś ją – zawołał Czerwona Żmija, uderzając włócznią. – Zamordowałeś ją – dodał, uchylając się przed przecinającym powietrze szerokim łukiem miecza. – Zabiłeś jej dzieci – krzyknął, wymierzając cios w gardło olbrzyma. Grot odbił się z głośnym zgrzytem od stalowych folg obojczyka zbroi.

– Oberyn się z nim bawi – stwierdział Ellaria Sand.

To zabawa głupca – pomyślał Tyrion.

– Ten cholerny Góra jest za wielki, żeby być czyjąkolwiek zabawką.

Gdy Góra zadaje cios, miecz robi pętlę w powietrzu (a looping cut), i znów wydaje mi się, że to może być odniesienie do (mniej więcej) kolistych orbit księżyców i komet. Warto również zwrócić uwagę na wzmiankę o zabawkach… spójrzcie na to: Ogar został poparzony przez swojego starszego brata Gregora za używanie jego zabwaki, którą był zabawkowy rycerz. Tutaj, Tyrion mówi, że Góra jest zbyt ‘cholernie wielki’ lub ‘krwawy’, żeby być czyjąkolwiek zabawką – rzeczywiście, jest zbyt duży dla śmiertelnika, ale nie dla boga. Widzieliśmy już czarne bloki bazaltu w Fosie Cailin – które, tak jak Gregor są symbolami meteorytów – opisywane jako ‘porzucone zabawki jakiegoś boga’. A zatem, Gregor, kamienna pięść i góra, która jeździ, rzeczywiście jest zabawkowym rycerzem – należącym do boga. Cóż za cholerna zabawka. To kolejny przykład sprytu George’a, a na dodatek kolejne powiązanie pomiędzy czarnym oleistym kamieniem i księżycowymi meteorami.

Walka trwa, z jeszcze większą ilością byczej symboliki:

Gregor spróbował szarży, lecz Oberyn odskoczył na bok i znalazł się za jego plecami. – Zgwałciłeś ją. Zamordowałeś ją. Zabiłeś jej dzieci.

– Cisza. – Wydawało się, że ser Gregor rusza się już nieco wolniej, a jego miecz nie unosi się tak wysoko, jak na początku walki. – Zamknij tę cholerną gębę.

‘Gregor spróbował zaszarżować jak byk’ (Gregor tried to bull rush). Błyskający miecz Gregora reprezentuje Światłonoścę, który jak widzicie, nie unosi się już tak wysoko jak niegdyś. Wiecie, zszedł na ziemię. To może być również bezpośrednie nawiązanie do Wenus, Gwiazdy Porannej, która stopniowo wschodzi niżej i niżej nad horyzontem, w miarę upływu jej cyklu, aż w końcu zmieni swą pozycję na tą Gwiazdy Wieczornej, stając się władczynią nocy. Co do róż (kolejna gra słów, pojawiającego się tu rose, unosił się, z różą, czyli również rose), widzieliśmy jak były używane jako symbole księżyca, były też zdania takie jak: ‘Drogon wznósł się, czarny na tle słońca‘ (Drogon rose, dark against the sun) i ‘Czerwone słońce wzeszło, zaszło i znowu wzeszło’ (a red sun rose and set and rose again). Podczas próby walki, słowo rose jest używane w podobny sposób, odnosząc się do Światłonoścy i księżycowego kwiatu, który go w sobie trzyma. Czy znów nazwałem Gregora kwiatkiem? Muszę się pilnować, ten gość łatwo się denerwuje.

– ZAMKNIJ SIĘ!

Gregor rzucił się do szarży, nadziewając się prosto na grot włóczni, który uderzył w jego pierś po prawej stronie, a potem ześlizgnął się w dół z ohydnym zgrzytem stali. Nagle Góra znalazł się wystarczająco blisko przeciwnika, by zadać cios. Jego olbrzymi miecz śmignął z niewiarygodną prędkością. Tłuszcza również krzyczała. Oberyn odbił pierwsze uderzenie i wypuścił z rąk włócznię, która na tak bliski dystans była bezużyteczna.

W oryginale ostatnie zdanie brzmi: Oberyn slipped the first blow and let go of the spear, useless now that Ser Gregor was inside it. Można je rozumieć na dwa sposoby: Gregor znalazł się tak blisko Oberyna, że włócznia okazała się bezużyteczna ze względu na swą długość – albo: włócznia stała się bezużyteczna bo ‘Gregor był w niej’ (Ser Gregor was inside it).

Zauważyliście to? Gregor znalazł się we włóczni. To księżyc w czarnej oleistej słonecznej włóczni. Widzicie? Księżyc jest w słonecznej włóczni, ponieważ słoneczne włócznie są zrobione z księżyca. He he he. To właśnie poczucie humoru George’a, więc sądzę, że warto zatrzymać się na chwilę, by się nim nacieszyć. Z całą pewnością lubi gry słów, dowolnego rodzaju. Gdy księżyc jest ‘we’ włoczni, nasz solarny król Oberyn opuszcza ją, przywodząc na myśl motyw słonecznych włóczni spadających z nieba. I nie zapominajcie, to oleista czarna włócznia, więc mamy tutaj: księżyc, który dostaje się do czarnej oleistej włóczni i słońce, które upuszcza czarne oleiste ostrze – kolejne powiązanie pomiędzy czarnym oleistym kamieniem i księżycowymi meteorami.

Tuż przed tym, słoneczna włócznia uderza w pierś księżyca, co przypomina odsłoniętą pierś Nissy Nissy, którą przebił Światłonośca. Towarzyszy temu kolejny ohydny sgrzyt stali, odpowiednik okrzyku boleści i ekstazy Nissy Nissy, który rozbił księżyc. Miecz Gregora znów błyska (flashes), tym razem w smudze stali (in a steel blur), co brzmi jak sugestia świecącego mieca, który jest niewyraźny, rozmazany. Oberyn unika pierwszego ciosu, po czym pada drugi:

Drugi cios Dornijczyk zatrzymał tarczą. Metal uderzył o metal z ogłuszającym brzękiem. Czerwona Góra zatoczył się na nogach.

To powtórka okrzyku Nissy Nissy pozostawiającego pęknięcie na twarzy księżyca: tym razem tarcza-lustro Oberyna gra rolę księżyca, a miecz Góry jest kometą-Światłonoścą. Gdy miecz uderza w tarczę, pojawia się dźwięk, który jest (dosłownie tłumacząc) rozrywający uszy (ear-splitting). Pomyślcie o rozrywaniu uszu jak o rozrywaniu głowy, a o księżycu jak o twarzy – i znów mamy dźwięk, który rozłupuje twarz księżyca, tak jak krzyk Nissy Nissy. Ten ‘rozrywający uszy’ szczęk sprawia, że Czerwona Żmija zatacza się (dosłownie: zostaje zachwiany, wstrząśnięty), co stanowi przedstawienie słońca ‘zranionego’ przez eksplozję księżyca. Słowa o tarczy, która łapie (catches) błyskający miecz przywodzą na myśl motyw heliotropu pijącego światło – tarcza słoneczne-lustro chwyta światło błyskającego miecza, który reprezentuje Światłonoścę, tak jak księżyc wypił światło słońca, połykając kometę-Światłonoścę.

Przy okazji, być może mamy tu również odniesienie do ‘szablonu’ trzech prób wykucia Światłonoścy. Nie jestem zupełnie pewien, ale pomyślałem, że i tak o tym wspomnę. Trzy próby zahartowania tego miecza dokonują się: w wodzie, w sercu lwa i w sercu Nissy Nissy. W scenie próby walki, po tym jak Góra dostaje się ‘do’ włóczni, zostają wymienione pierwszy i drugi cios: najpierw Oberyn ‘odbił’ cios (ang. slipped the first blow, dosłownie ześlizgnął pierwsze uderzenie), a potem ‘złapał tarczą’. A zatem, słowo ‘ześlizgnął’ (slipped) w pewien sposób przywodzi na myśl wodę, a opuszczona broń Oberyna może sugerować nieudaną próbę wykucia. Drugie cięcie powoduje ‘rozrywający uszy’ dźwięk, co może odpowiedać drugiej próbie, w sercu lwa, przy której miecz roztrzaskał się i przełamał. Interpretowałem to jako odniesienie do rozdzielenia się komety, więc słowo ‘split’ w tym zdaniu z legendy wydało mi się ważne – a tutaj znów je widzimy, przy drugim ciosie ser Gregora. Trzeci cios rzeczywiście znajduje ofiarę, choć nie wygląda ona na Nissę Nissę:

Tuż za nim była stajnia. Widzowie przepychali się z wrzaskiem, chcąc zejść z drogi walczącym. Jeden z nich wpadł Oberynowi na plecy. Ser Gregor zamachnął się mieczem z całą swą straszliwą siłą. Czerwona Żmija padł na ziemię i przetoczył się na bok. Pechowy chłopiec stajenny za jego plecami nie był taki szybki. Gdy uniósł rękę, by osłonić twarz, miecz Gregora uciął mu ją między łokciem a ramieniem.

– Zamknij SIĘ! – ryknął Góra, słysząc wrzask nieszczęśnika.

Tym razem uderzył mieczem w bok i górna połowa głowy chłopaka pofrunęła w powietrze, tryskając wokół krwią i mózgiem.

Chłopiec stajenny to nie księżycowa dziewica, nie posiada również żadnej oczywistej symboliki, ale rana twarzy i dekapitacja, a także tryskająca krew, pasuje do motywu ścięcia księżyca i pęknięcia na jego twarzy. Jak mówiłem, nie jestem pewien, czy George zamierzał zasugerować tu trzy próby wykucia, ale uznałem, że warto Wam o tym wspomnieć, byście mogli sami zadecydować.

W każdym razie, wszystkie dźwięki i ciosy w tym akapicie pokazują nam świetną symbolikę: hałas rozrywający uszy i trzaski, gdy uderzenie trafia w pierś lub tarczę-lustro, a także deszcz krwi, ścięcie, spadającą włócznię, księżycową postać dostającą się ‘do’ włóczni – to wszystko bardzo dobra symbolika. Jeszcze lepiej, za moment zasugeruję, że rana ramienia (arm wound, w oryginale chłopiec unosi całe ramię) zadana przez symbol Światłonoścy, taki jak miecz Gregora, może symbolizować księżycowy meteor, który – jak uważam – uderzył w Ramię Dorne i został zapamiętany jako Młot Wód. Ale odłóżmy ten pomysł na bok na jeszcze kilka akapitów.

Góra odwrócił się błyskawicznie. Hełm, tarcza, miecz, opończa; od stóp do głów cały był zbryzgany krwią.

– Za dużo gadasz – warknął. – Boli mnie od tego głowa.

Góra znów obraca się, wiruje (whirls), jak planeta, a teraz jest pokryty krwią. Gregor stał się teraz prawdziwym księżycem z krwawnika, kamieniem zbroczonym ofiarną krwią. Nie mogę nie zastanawiać się czy to nie gra słów na imieniu Gregora. Jego zbroja jest zawsze opisywana jako szara (grey, a teraz staje się pokryta posoką (gore, właśnie to słowo pojawia się w powyższym fragmencie) – grey gore? Gregor? To nie byłby pierwszy przykład tego jak George ukrywa w czyimś imieniu grę słów. W każdym razie, Oberyn sprawia, że Gregora boli głowa, co ma sens, ponieważ to ta sama głowa na której znajduje się kamienna pięść, która symbolizuje drugi księżyc. Zawiera ciemność i gęstą czarną krew – i wkrótce zostanie oddzielona od ciała.

Góra prychnął z pogardą i runął do ataku… i w tej samej chwili zza nisko wiszących chmur, które od świtu przesłaniały niebo, wyszło słońce.

Słońce Dorne – powiedział sobie Tyrion, lecz to Gregor Clegane zajął pozycję ze słońcem za plecami. Jest tępy i brutalny, ale ma instynkty wojownika.

Jeśli Gregor to księżyc, George właśnie stworzył zaćmienie słońca, z księżycem znajdującym się przed słońcem. Spójrzmy, czy wydarzy się coś niezwykłego!

Czerwona Żmija przykucnął, przymrużył oczy i znowu uderzył włócznią. Ser Gregor ciął w nią mieczem, lecz atak okazał się zmyłką. Góra stracił równowagę i zatoczył się krok do przodu.

Książę Oberyn przechylił poobijaną metalową tarczę. Snop słonecznych promieni odbił się od gładzonego złota i miedzi, trafiając prosto w wąską szparę hełmu jego przeciwnika. Clegane uniósł tarczę, by osłonić oczy. Włócznia księcia Oberyna uderzyła niczym błyskawica i znalazła lukę w ciężkiej zbroi, spoinę pod pachą¹. Grot przebił się przez kolczugę i utwardzaną skórę. Gdy Dornijczyk obrócił włócznię i wyrwał ją z rany, Gregor wydał z siebie stłumione stęknięcie.

– Elia! Powiedz to! Elia z Dorne!Krążył wokół niego z włócznią gotową do zadania następnego ciosu. – Powiedz to!

¹ w oryginale: pod ramieniem (under the arm)

A zatem, tuż po tym jak księżycowy wojownik znalazł się przed słońcem, został trafiony zatrutą słoneczną włócznią. Kto by przypuszczał? Oczywiście, my. Widzimy teraz sztuczkę z tarczą-zwierciadłem, przywodzącą na myśl opowieść o Serwynie i motyw heliotropu jako lustra dla słońca. Zwróćcie uwagę na podobieństwa do historii Perseusza i Meduzy: Meduza to bogini o głowie pełnej węży, co pasuje do naszego drugiego ksieżyca, który wydaje na świat smoki, a właśnie tę rolę gra podczas walki Gregor. Perseusz zamienia Meduzę w kamień dzięki sztuczce z tarczą-lustrem, podczas gdy Gregor, oślepiony przez odbicie słonecznego światła na tarczy, już jest kamiennym olbrzymem. To nie dokładne odbicie mitu o Perseuszu, 1 do 1, ale wszystkie jego elementy widzimy również tutaj, nieco przetasowane. Porozmawiamy o Meduzie później, gdy wrócimy do motywu siateczki na włosy Sansy z czarnych ametystów symbolizujących głowę pęłną węży.

Tarcza Oberyna gra rolę lustra dla słońca, a wiemy że heliotrop/krwawnik jest zwierciadłem słonecznym. W legendzie z Qarthu, powiadzane jest, że smoki potrafią ziać ogniem, poniaż piły płomienie słońca, dokładnie tak jak krwawnik, który jest nasączony energią i mocą słońca, ponieważ jest heliotropem, kamieniem słońca. Heliotropiczna tarcza-lustro Oberyna czyni to samo, pijąc światło słońce, a potem odbijając promienie snopem (ang. shaft, znaczy również drzewiec włóczni). Zwróćcie uwagę na słowo ‘shaft’ – drzewiec – użyte tu by opisać światło. Tak jak tarcza Oberyna, Gregor symbolizuje księżyc, także i on zostaje skąpany w odbitym świetle słońca. A dzieje się to dokładnie w chwili, gdy zostaje ugodzony słoneczną włócznią. Włócznia i snop światła to paralelne symbole, tak jak na herbie Dorne. Bo przecież powiadają, że słońce i włócznia to najgroźniejszy oręż Dornijczyków.

Możliwe, że George pokazuje nam dualizm światła i ciemności – jasny snop słonecznego światła i czarną oleistą włócznię. To troche tak jak z zabójczym cienio-dzieckiem, które przybiera postać Stannisa, włada cienio-mieczem i jest nazywane ‘cieniem z mieczem, którego tam nie było’. To cień Światłonoścy. Tak jak Lew Nocy jest cienistym aspektem słońca i Dziewica Zrobiona ze Światła jasnym, wydaje się możliwym, że sam Światłonośca ma taką dychotomię… a jeśli rzeczywiście tak jest, wydaje mi się, że Świt i czarny miecz Azora Ahai mogą być kolejną parą światła i ciemności.

W każdym razie, Gregor skąpany w ogniu słońca w chwili zadania śmiertelnej rany odpowiada mitowi z Qarthu o księżycowych meteorach-smokach pijących ogień słońca – i bardziej ogólnie, do księżycowej dziewicy przebitej przez Światłonoścę, płonący miecz słońca. To również paraela alchemicznych godów, gdzie ksieżycowa dziewica Daenerys jest całkiem dosłownie skąpana w ogniu słońca, gdy pękają smocze jaja.

Oprócz tego że sam Gregor tworzy zaćmienie, robi to również swoją tarczą. Widzieliśmy również tarczę Clegane’a zachowującą się jak księżyc, ‘gwiazda’ która staje się trzema czarnymi przedmiotami. Gregor usiłuje zablokować ‘drzewiec’-snop światła przy pomocy tej tarczy, co przywodzi na myśl ksieżyc zasłaniający słońce podczas zaćmienia, blokujący jego światło. Dwa zaćmienia w cenie jednego!

W tym ważnym momencie, włocznia ‘przebija się’ (punches, czyli również: zadaje cios pięścią) przez otwór w płytowej zbroi Gregora, co stanowi echo kamiennej pięści, którą widzimy na hełmie Góry. Ten motyw jest podkreślony później w Uczcie dla wron. Oto Qyburn rozmawiający z Cersei:

– Jego giermek powiedział mi, że Górę często dręczą straszliwe bóle głowy i że wypija wtedy mnóstwo makowego mleka, jak mniej potężni ludzie piją ale. Tak czy inaczej, żyły poczerniały mu na całym ciele, mocz ma zanieczyszczony ropą, a w jego boku trucizna wyżarła dziurę wielkości mojej pięści.

Widzimy tutaj znajomy motyw ślepoty (w oryginale Góra cierpi na bóle głowy, które ‘go oślepiają, oszałamiają’, blinding headaches) i czarnej krwi powiązany z Gregorem, a jadowita słoneczna włocznia znów jest powiązana z pięścią. Tak jak kamienna pięść Gregora, pozostawiająca rany wielkości pięści, słoneczna włócznia wpasowuje się w szerszy symboliczny motyw ognistej ręki boga, która ciska czarnymi meteorami. To wzmacnia to co mówiłem o tym że zarówno solarny jak i lunarny wojownik posiada broń, która symbolizuje różne aspekty Światłonoścy. I Oberyn i Gregor posiadają symbolikę ręki i pięści, obaj posiadają broń-Światłonoścę, ale pokazują nam różne rzeczy dotyczące tego miecza. Pięść Gregora podkreśla motywy związane z kamieniem i spadającą górą, podczas gdy uderzająca włócznia Oberyna poczernia krew i zostawia dziurę. Pięść Gregora pokazuje nam, że kamienne pięści przybywają z księżyca, włócznia Oberyna pokazuje, iż słońce jest tym co poczernia i zatruwa księżycową skałę. Czerwone rękawice Oberyna całkiem dokładnie odzwierciedlają pięść Gregora pod koniec tej sceny. W kulminacyjnym momencie tego rozdziału, pojawia się wzmianka o tym, że właśnie ta pięść jest pokryta krwią, tuż przed tym jak rozbija twarz Oberyna. Jeśli chodzi o ich broń, możliwe, że to znowu dychotomia światła i ciemności – mamy wielki błyskający miecz i jesionową włócznią z grotem pokrytym czarnym olejem.


Błyskawica i Gromowładny

A teraz błyskawica. Czarna oleista włócznia księcia Oberyna ‘uderzyła niczym błyskawica’, gdy ugodziła Gregora w ramię podczas ‘gregorowego zaćmienia’ – a oczywiście, włócznia Czerwonej Żmii to jeden z głównych symboli księżycowych meteorów. To wydaje się ważne, ponieważ sugerowałem, że zarówno Młot Wód jak i grom Boga Sztormów z opowieści o Szarym Królu także odnoszą się do uderzeń ksieżycowych meteorów. To trochę intuicyjne, jako że ‘Młot Wód’ i ‘grom’ po prostu kojarzą się ze spadającymi meteorami. Starożytne ludy często nazywały je ‘kamieniami-grzmotami’ (thunder stones) – nietrudno się domyślić dlaczego.

Jeśli ksieżycowa katastrofa rzeczywiście miała miejsce, powinniśmy odnaleźć liczne mity o spadających meteorach, więc zacząłem puszukiwać opowieści, które mogą odnosić się właśnie do nich, podobnych do tych dwóch które przed chwilą przytoczyłem. W micie Szarego Króla o grzmocie, podobnie jak w legendzie o morskim smoku, pojawia się motyw kradzieży ognia bogów – a widzieliśmy, że to centralna oś mitu o Światłonoścy. Ale oczywiście, to wszystko sięga znacznie głębiej.

Na początek: wiemy, że Martin zaczerpnął sporo z mitologii nordyckiej, a skandynawskim bogiem burz jest nie kto inny jak Thor, ‘Gromowładny’, posiadacz słynnego i kozackiego młota zwanego Mjölnir, którego uderzenia wywołują błyskawice i grzmoty. Mamy tu bardzo cenną wskazówkę, według której powinniśmy powiązywać młoty z błyskawicami i burzami, w szczególności dlatego że w legendzie o Szarym Królu to właśnie Bóg Sztormów (ang. storm – burza) ciska gromem – a Thor był właśnie bogiem burz. Młot Thora i jego gromy to w gruncie rzeczy ta sama broń, więc gfyby Młot Wód i grom Boga Sztormów okazały się tym samym – księżycowymi meteorami – wszystko zaczęłoby do siebie pasować. I rzeczywiście, wygląda na to, że dokładnie tak jest.

Thor's Battle Against the Jötnar (1872) by Mårten Eskil Winge

Walka Thora przeciwko Jötnarom (Olbrzymom), Mårten Eskil Winge, 1872. Zwróćcie uwagę na czarnego kozła z Qohoru na przednim planie.

Młot Wód złamał Ramię Dorne, a dornijskie miasto tuż obok ‘Złamanego Ramienia’ nazywa się Słoneczna Włocznia. ‘Słoneczna włócznia’ to łatwy do rozpoznania opis naszych płonących meteorów, toteż uznałem nadanie właśnie takiej nazwy stolicy Dorne za wskazówkę – mówiącą nam, że Młot Wód był słoneczną włocznią, księżycowym meteorytem. Włocznia Oberyna, o stalowym grocie pokrytym czarną trucizną, która wygląda jak olej bądź smar, sugeruje że ‘włócznie’ i ksieżycowe meteoryty mają coś wspólnego z czarnym oleistym kamieniem, który odnajdujemy tu i ówdzie. Podczas pojedynku pierwszy trafiony cios oleistej słonecznej włóczni, ten który ma miejsce podczas ‘gregorowego zaćmienia’ – a przez to symbolizuje wykucie Światłonoścy – zostaje opisany jako ‘uderzający niczym błyskawica’. A uderza w spoinę pod ramieniem. Jak wspominałem, sądzę że te wszystkie rzucające się w oczy rany ramion pojawiające się podczas tych scen odtwarzających wykucie Światłonoścy to wskazówki przekazujące nam, że Młot Wód, który zdruzgotał Ramię Dorne, był ksieżycowym meteorem.


Warto wspomnieć, że słowo martel, martellus lub martell oznacza w wielu językach wywodzących się z łaciny młot. Stąd władca Franków  znany w Polsce jako Karol Młot w publikacjach angielskich i francuskich występuje jako Charles Martel, a w niemieckich jako Karl Martell. (przypis tłumacza)


Moim zdaniem takich konkretnych powiązań jest zbyt dużo by można je uznać za przypadek – a będzie jeszcze lepiej. Poza złamaniem Ramienia Dorne, Młot Wód miał ponoć zatopić Przesmyk (ang. the Neck – szyja, kark), gdzie żyją Wyspiarze. A tutaj mamy Gregora wydającego stłumione stęknięcie (choked grunt) w chwili gdy jego ramię zostaje ugodzone – być może to nawiązamie do ‘zadławienia Szyi’ Westeros (choking of the Neck). Wcześniej podczas walki, chłopiec stajenny otrzymał te same rany – odcięte ramię i odciętą głowę. Zadając drugi cios, ten który odrąbuje głowę, Gregor ma na celu uciszenie jego wrzasków – zabijając go krzczy ‘Zamknij SIĘ!’. I znowu, to może sugerować poderżnięcie gardłą lub uduszenie, idące w parze z dekapitacją.

To dość poważna sprawa, więc na moment przerwiemy walkę i porozmawiamy co nieco o Młocie Wód. Skoro już wprowadziłem pomysł według którego rany zadane w ramię lub szyję danej osoby symbolizują zniszczenia jakie Młot Wód wyrządził Westeros, chciałbym przez chwilę kontynuować ten temat – żebyście zrozumieli, że nie wskoczyłem od tak sobie do jakiejś łódki dla zwolenników teorii spiskowych i zacząłem wiosłować w złym kierunku. Jeśli chcę twierdzić, że rozwiązałem tę zagadkę, muszę podać jakieś dowody na potwierdzenie mojej tezy. Jak zwykle, George wszędzie ukrywa swoje wzory, więc nie brakuje przykładów do przytoczenia. W żadnym wypadku nie zamierzam przedstawiać ich wszystkich, ale podzielę się kilkoma moimi ulubionymi. W każdej z tych scen pojawi się osoba odnosząca ranę w ramię lub szyję, w samym środku metafory wykuwania Światłonoścy – będę nazywał je ‘urazem od Młota Wód’. Porozmawiamy również o Fosie (Moat) Cailin, tradycji związanej z samym Młotem oraz olbrzymach budzących się w ziemi.

No dobrze… Pamiętacie cytat o Kąsaczu, Brienne i zakrwawionym mieczu, który był jak długi język? Pod koniec tej walki ramię Brienne zostaje złamane, a Kąsacz usiłuje ją udusić i oderwać jej głowę – to obrażenia ramienia i szyi, a dokładniej ‘złamane ramię’. Na dodatek we wspomnianej scenie wielokrotnie pojawiają się błyskawice, w tym doskonała gra słów, tworząca powiązanie pomiędzy młotem i gromem:

Brienne wessała powietrze przez zęby, wyciągając Wiernego Przysiędze. Zbyt wielu – pomyślała z rodzącym się strachem. Jest ich zbyt wielu.
– Gendry – rzekła cichym głosem. – Znajdź gdzieś miecz i zbroję. To nie są twoi przyjaciele. Oni nie są niczyimi przyjaciółmi.
– Co ty gadasz?
Chłopak podszedł do niej, trzymając w rękach młot.
Gdy jeźdźcy zsunęli się z siodeł, na południe od gospody uderzył piorun.

W oryginale ‘uderzył piorun’ następuje bezpośrednio po ‘trzymając w rękach młot’:

The boy came and stood beside her, his hammer in his hand./Lightning cracked to the south as the riders swung down off their horses. 

Zauważyliście to? Jedno zdanie kończy się słowami ‘z młotem w ręku’, a następne zaczyna się od ‘uderzył piorun…’. W tej scenie dzieje się sporo – rozdział z którego pochodzi do z całą pewnością kolejny kandydat do ‘recenzji odcinka’ – ale musiałem wspomnieć o niej tutaj, ponieważ łączy młot i błyskawicę ze złamanymi ramionami i duszonymi szyjami – a wszystko to pośród symboli Światłonoścy, takich jak krwawa włócznia-język oraz Wierny Przysiędze. Później, gdy Brienne budzi się i przypomina sobie starcie i złamane ramię, pojawia się kolejne odniesienie do gromu:

Nawet w głębinach snu ból jej nie opuszczał. Twarz ją piekła. Bark krwawił. Każdy oddech był cierpieniem. Wzdłuż ramienie przebiegały błyskawice agonii. Prosiła krzykiem o maestera.

Następnie mamy ser Arysa Oakhearta, noszącego płaszcz blady jak księżyc, który odnosi  taki sam zestaw ran przy spotkaniy z ‘żoną z jesionu i żelaza’ Areo Hotaha – odcięte ramię i odciętą głowę. Również w tym przypadku wszystko dzieje się pośrodku wręcz ogromnej ilości symboliki wykuwania Światłonoścy. Tuż przed tym jak Aero pozbawia ser Arysa kończyny i głowy, dostajemy jedno z moich ulubionych zdań w całej serii – już od dawna czekałem na chwilę gdy się nim z Wami podzielę. Arianne Martell i Ciemna Gwiazda (ten gość to chodząca metafora) wleką się przed dornijską pustynię. Wówczas pojawia się taki opis:

Promienie słońa uderzały w wędrowców z siłą młota, ale nie miało to znaczenia, gdyż kres podróży był już blisko.

“The sun was beating down like a fiery hammer, but it did not matter with their journey at its end.”  

To bardzo sprytne użycie gry słów, ponieważ koniec podróży symbolizuje ‘lądowanie’ ognistego słonecznego młota. Ich podróże odpowiadają sobie. Wyprawa Arianne i jej towarzyszy kończy się odniesieniem ‘obrażeń od Młota Wód’ (głowa i szyja) przez Arysa Oakhearta, ale również przecięciem twarzy innej księżycowej dziewicy, Myrcelli, przez Ciemną Gwiazdę. Wspominałem, że Ciemna Gwiazda jest symbolem Krwawnikowego Cesarza, co spawia że jego cios w twarz Myrcelli staje się metaforyczną sceną wykucia Światłonoścy, idącą w parze z ranami od Młota Wód ser Arysa. A wszystko to ma miejsce tuż po tym jak ‘promienie słońca uderzają z siłą młota’. Głowa Oakhearta ląduje ‘pośród trzcin’ (among the reeds) co moim zdaniem powinno przywodzić na myśl uderzenie meteoru, które ‘dusi’ i ‘zadławia’ Szyję Westeros (The Neck, czyli Przesmyk). A właśnie tam włada ród Reedów – a reed znaczy trzcina.

Z pewnością łatwo przyjdzie Wam uwierzyć, że gdy po raz pierwszy przeczytałem ten fragment o ognistym młocie słońca, od razu rzucił mi się w oczy, wykoczył z kartki i uderzył mnie niczym młot. I pamiętajcie, ta scena rozgrywa się w Dorne, tuż obok miejsca w które uderzył Młot Wód. A zatem, mamy słońce które uderza jak ognisty młot i słoneczna włócznia… Właśnie tak.

Jeśli nadal nie jesteście przekonani – wiem, że są wśród was sceptycy, niech was Bóg błogosławi – jedna z wysp tworzących Stopnie nazywa się Krwawy Kamień/Krwawnik (Bloodstone). To jak podpis na ścianie – ‘krwawnik tu był’‘Chcesz się zabawić, zadzwoń do Azora Ahai’ i tak dalej… Mamy zatem miejsca o nazwie Krwawnik i Słoneczna Włócznia tuż obok Złamanego Ramienia, stojące tam niczym wielkie znaki ‘to my to zrobiliśmy’. Strzeżcie się ognistych młotów i spadających krwawników, są bardzo niebezpieczne.

A zatem, Młot Wód był księżycowym meteorem, do którego przywarło określenie krwawnik. Według legendy Azor Ahai rozłupał księżyc gdy przebił Nissę Nissę. To kolejne potwierdzenie teorii głoszącej, że tak naprawdę Krwawnikowy Cesarz i Azor Ahai to ta sama osoba – ktoś kto zniszczył księżyc i spuścił Młot Wód.

Innymi słowy, Młot Wód był przyczyną Długiej Nocy. Spójrzcie na tę ważną wskazówkę sugerującą, że Młot był przyczyną Nocy, którą George zostawił nam już w Starciu królów:

Theon miał zamiar mu powiedzieć, gdzie może sobie wsadzić takie bajeczki, nagle jednak odezwał się maester Luwin.
– Historycy podają, że w czasach, gdy zielone oczy próbowały zalać Prrzesmyk,
wyspiarze zbliżyli się do dzieci lasu. Niewykluczone, że dysponują jakąś tajemną wiedzą.
Nagle puszcza wydała mu się znacznie mroczniejsza niż przed chwilą, jakby chmura przesłoniła słońce. Głupi chłopak mógł gadać od rzeczy, ale maesterzy słynęli z mądrości.


W oryginale wypowiedź Luwina brzmi następująco:

“The histories say the crannogmen grew close to the children of the forest in the days when the greenseers tried to bring the hammer of the waters down upon the Neck.  It may be that they have secret knowledge.”  Suddenly the wood seemed a deal darker than it had a moment before, as if a cloud had passed before the sun.  

‘W czasach, gdy zielonowidze próbowali sprowadzić Młot Wód w dół, na Przesmyk’


To dość jasne – mowa o Młocie Wód, a w chwilę potem wszystko ciemnieje, jak gdyby coś przesłoniło słońce. Powinienem wspomnieć o tym, że nie sądzę by to Dzieci Lasu spuściły Młot, a raczej nie tylko one, a z całą pewnością nie zrobiły tego, by powstrzymać Pierwszych Ludzi – ale o tym porozmawiamy innnym razem. Zastanówcie się jednak nad logiczną niespójnością słów Luwina – jeśli Dzieci zbliżyły się do ludzi żyjących w Przesmyku, Wyspiarzy, to czemu miałyby próbować zniszczyć ich dom? Jeśli o mnie chodzi, nie potrafię sobie wyobrazić tego jak Dzieci robią cokolwiek by zniszczyć ziemię. Zgadzam się z tym, że zabijałyby ludzi gdyby było to korzystne dla ziemi – pewnie można by je nazwać bardzo agresywnymi obrońcami środowiska – ale wywoływanie ogromnej skali trzęsień ziemi i robienie czegoś co skutkuje zapadnięciem Długiej Nocy… moim zdaniem to nie wygląda na coś co one by zrobiły.

Znamy dwa różnie miejsca gdzie ‘zielonowidze spuścili na dół Młot’: Wyspę Twarzy i Wieżę Dzieci w Fosie Cailin. Druga opcja nie ma sensu, ponieważ Młot uszkodził Przesmyk, gdzie stoi Fosa. To jak zrzucenie sobie młotka na głowę. A poza tym, od kiedy Dzieci Lasu mieszkają w czarnych zamkach i rzucają zaklęcia ze szczytów wież? To brzmi raczej jak działania innego naszego znajomego, nieprawdaż? Paranie się powodującą kataklizm magią krwi, na szczycie wieży zbudowanej z czarnego kamienia, który może, choć nie musi, być czarnym oleistym kamieniem…

Sama Wieża Dzieci pokazuje nam kilka wskazówek. Wspominałem już wcześniej, że wieża ma ‘złamaną koronę’  i jest ‘smukła jak włócznia’. Wcześniej mówiliśmy o tym w odniesieniu do ‘panien smukłych jak włócznia’ (slender-as-a-spear maidens) które pojawiają się od czasu od czasu, ale biorąc pod uwagę to co widzieliśmy przy włóczni Oberyna, wygląda na to, że mamy tutaj świetne odniesienie do czarnej oleistej włóczni, na dodatek bezpośrednio powiązanej z Młotem Wód. Jako wisienkę na torcie, dodam że gdy zastęp Robba szedł groblą na południe i zatrzymał się w Fosie Cailin na noc, pojawił się opis trzech chorągwi wywieszonych na szczytach tych trzech wież, które nadal stoją. Na jednej Robb rozwija proporzec z wilkorem Starków, na kolejnej powiewa promieniste słońce Karstarków… a z Wieży Dzieci, gdzie zamieszkali Umberowie… ich olbrzym w rozerwanych łańcuchach.

Starzy bogowie się przebudzili, podobnie jak śpiące w ziemi olbrzymy, a całe Westeros zatrzęsło się i zadrżało. W ziemi pojawiły się ogromne szczeliny, które pochłonęły wzgórza i całe góry. Potem wypełniło je morze i Ramię Dorne złamało się pod naporem wód, aż wreszcie ponad powierzchnią pozostała tylko garstka jałowych, skalistych wysepek. Morze Letnie połączyło się z wąskim morzem, a most między Essos a Westeros zniknął na zawsze.
Tak przynajmniej głosi legenda.

Powyższy cytat pochodzi z rozdziału o Młocie Wód w Świecie Lodu i Ognia. Wprowadziłbym tutaj tylko jedną zmian. W miejsce ‘morza wdarły się w głąb lądu’ (the seas came rushing in) napisałbym, że to morski smok wdarł się w głąb lądu i złamał Ramię Dorne. Poza tym szczegółem Yandel spisał się doskonale. I pamiętajcie… jedną z tych jałowych, skalistych wysepek jest Krwawnik (Krwawy Kamień). Jeśli sądzicie, że znów o tym wspomnę – macie rację. Napisałem dwa bardzo obszerne eseje o krwawniku (bloodstone) i jego związkach z Pieśnią Lodu i Ognia, więc musicie zrozumieć jak bardzo się podekscytowałem gdy zobaczyłem na mape ‘Bloodstone’ w samym środku Złamanego Ramienia. A potem zobaczyłem jak Oberyn wbija swoje czarne oleiste ostrze w ramię Gregora… to właśnie z takich chwil rodzą się marzenia lub podcasty, przyjaciele. Prawdę mówiąc dopiero gdy to wszystko ułożyło mi się w głowie, przypomniałem sobie, że młot Thora strzela błyskawicami i gromami.

Skoro mowa o olbrzymach budzących się w ziemi jako metaforze trzęsienia ziemi, Gregor-kamienny olbrzym pokazuje nam taką symbolikę na początku próby walki:

Dzieliło ich od siebie piećdziesiąt jardów. Książę Oberyn szedł naprzód szybko, natomiast Góra posuwał się ociężałym, złowieszczym krokiem. Ziemia wcale się nie trzęsie pod jego stopami – przekonywał sam siebie Tyrion. To tylko serce mi tak wali.

Gregor reprezentuje przerożne kataklizmy które przychodzą z księżyca – czarną krew, ciemnośc, kamienne pięści, jeżdżące góry – i sądzę, że należy do tego worka wrzucić również trzęsienia ziemi. I rzeczywiście, uderzenia komet i meteorytów mogą wywoływać trzęsienia ziemi, zwłaszcza jeśli wylądują w pobliżu linii uskoku – nawet jeśli eksplodują w atmosferze (tak jak meteor, który wywołał katastrofę tunguską), ich siła w skali Richtera jest podobna jak w przypadku trzęsień ziemi.

Zauważyłem, że wszystkie postaci, które odnoszą ‘rany od Młota Wód’ – w ramię i szyję – są w pewnym sensie olbrzymami. Gregor jest kamiennym gigantem, to jasne. Ser Arys Oakheart pochodzi od Johna od Dębu, którego według legendy Garth Zielonoręki spłodził z olbrzymką. Brienne jest niezwykle wysoka – być może pochodzi od ser Duncana Wysokiego (czyli Dunka z Dunka i Jaja), który również jest nazywany olbrzymem. Warto wspomnieć o tym, że wierzchowiec Dunka nosi imię Grom (Thunder), a bohater jednocześnie odnosi i zadaje poważne obrażenia ramienia podczas pojedynku z ser Lucasem Longinchem w punkcie kulminacyjnym Wiernego miecza. Nieszczęsny chłopiec stajenny, który najpierw traci ramię, a poźniej głowę z ręki ser Gregora nie jest olbrzymem, ale wiemy kto z całą pewnością może zostać tak nazwany. Mam tu na myśli Hodora, który sam w sobie posiada interesujący symbolizm – zajmiemy się nim gdy przyjdzie na to pora. Również Tyrion ma nieprzyjemne przygody z ranami ramion i szyi – a wielokrotnie zostaje nazwany olbrzymem.

Wszyscy ci giganci odnoszą rany które reprezentują ziemię, a olbrzymy zbudziły sięz ziemi. Księżycowy meteor z całą pewnością może wywołać trzęsienie ziemi, a Młot Wód ‘zbudził śpiących w ziemi olbrzymów’ i bez wątpienia spowodował wielkie trzęsienie ziemi. To wszystko sprawia, że zaczynam podejrzewać, że te postaci reprezentują samą ziemię – budzących się w niej olbrzymów – a być może zjednoczenie meteorytu i ziemi. Kamienna pięść Gregora pokazuje nam meteor uderzający w ziemię, i wygląda na to, że jest kluczem to rozwikłania tej zagadki – ci bohaterowie pokazują nam przemianę z jednego stanu w następny. To przemiana księżycowego meteoru w część ziemi budzi śpiących w niej olbrzymów – i z tego powodu widzimy, że postaci-księżycowe meteory, które są gigantami, odnoszą rany od Młota Wód.

Pod koniec ostatniego cytatu, po tym jak Gregor sprawia, że ziemia drży, pojawia się wzmianka o tym, że serce Tyriona ‘wali’ (w oryginale trzepocze – flutters – jak skrzydła ptaka). Może to serce mające skrzydła, które może latać? Meteory mogą zostać opisane jako serce spadającej gwiazdy – lub jako ogniste serce, tak jak to które widzimy na sztandarach Stannisa. Tymczasem Tyrion jest synem słońca i według wszelkiego prawdopodobieństwa potomkiem smoków, więc opis jego serca jako ‘trzepoczącego’ tworzy obraz latającego lub płonącego serca meteoru, które znamy po prostu jako Azora Ahai odrodzonego.

Można dojść do wniosku, że jak na razie ignorowałem Tyriona – ale robię tak, ponieważ zamierzam kiedyś zająć się tylko Tyrionem. Wspomnę jednak, że motyw Tyriona jako dziecka lwa i smoka dobrze pasuje do niego jako ‘Azora Ahai odrodzonego’, a dokładniej jednej z ‘trzech głów smoka’. Na samym końcu tego rozdziału Tyrion zostaje sprowadzony w dół po ‘serpentynowych’ schodach (od serpent – wąż) i wtrącony do czarnych cel. Nazywa wtedy siebie martwym człowiekiem/trupem. A to bardzo ładnie podkreśla, że Azor Ahai odrodzony był umarłym/nieumarłym.

Co to ma znaczyć? – pytacie. – Lubimy Tyriona, dlaczego tak się z nami droczysz, dlaczego nie dasz nam więcej Tyriona? No dobrze, dam Wam trochę więcej Tyriona. Jak wspominałem, Lannister jest wielokrotnie nazywany olbrzymem – na przykład moim lannisterskim olbrzymem, albo gdy maester Aemon mówi: ‘olbrzymem, który przybył tu do nas, na koniec świata’ – zwłaszcza to ostatnie zdanie jest ciekawe. Olbrzym, który przybywa na koniec świata. Brzmi trochę katastroficznie. Rzecz w tym, że Tyrion-olbrzym odnosi ‘obrażenia od Młota Wód’ podczas Bitwy nad Zielonymi Widłami w Grze o tron. Czytając poniższy fragment, wyobraźcie sobie Tyriona jako księżyc zrzucony z nieba. I przypomnijcie sobie, że łacińskie słowo ‘lucifer’ znaczy ‘przynoszący-światło’, ale również ‘gwiazda poranna’ (morningstar, tak jak w nazwie broni morgensztern – ‘gwiazdy zarannej’. W polskim tłumaczeniu słowo morningstar zastępuje ‘kula nabita kolcami’):

Rycerz pędził wprost na niego, kręcąc nad głową nabitą kolcami kulą. Ich rumaki natarły na siebie, zanim Tyrion zdążył otworzyć usta, żeby zawołać Bronna. Z jego prawego łokcia popłynęła fala bólu, po tym jak kolczasta kula uderzyła go w okolicę stawu. Upuścił topór. Sięgnął po miecz, lecz rycerz znowu zakręcił kulą, tym razem mierząc w jego twarz. Usłyszał nieprzyjemne chrupnięcie i poczuł, że spada. Nie pamiętał chwili upadku na ziemię, lecz gdy otworzył oczy, ujrzał nad sobą tylko niebo. Przewrócił się na bok i spróbował wstać, jednak fala bólu wstrząsnęła jego ciałem i cały świat zadrżał. Rycerz, który go strącił z konia pojawił się nad nim. – Tyrionie Krasnalu – zagrzmiał. – Jesteś mój. Poddajesz się, Lannister?

Tak, pomyślał Tyrion, lecz słowo ugrzęzło mu w gardle. Jęknął tylko i spróbował dźwignąć się na kolana, szukając jednocześnie broni. Miecza, sztyletu, czegokolwiek…

– Poddajesz się? – Rycerz patrzył na niego z wysokości grzbietu rumaka. Jeździec i jego koń wydawali się ogromni, żelazna kula kołysała się powoli. Tyrion czuł, że ma zdrętwiałe ręce obraz zamazany i pustą pochwę. – Poddaj się albo zginiesz – rzekł zdecydowanie rycerz, kręcąc kulą coraz szybciej.

To dość spektakularny przykład – ‘nadciągająca jak burza’/’pędząca na niego jak grom’ (w oryginale thundering) gwiazda poranna zrzuca naszego olbrzyma-księżyc z nieba, uderzając i raniąc jego ramię. Z punktu widzenia Tyriona nie ma w tym nic zabawanego, ale dla nas to świetna mityczna astronomia. Tyrion ‘chwyta w pazury’ (claws) swój miecz, przywodzące na myśl smocze szpony, jak prawdziwy księżycowy smok. Trzymał w ręce topór, po czym go stracił, tak jak Gregor, którego miecz wylatuje mu z rąk, gdy zostaje ugodzony przez podobną do błyskawicy włócznię. Wygląda na to, że w międzyczasie Tyrion zdążył również zgubić swój miecz – to ten sam motyw. Pojawia się również sugestia rany szyi – słowa grzęzną Tyrionowi w gardle i może jedynie zarechotać (croak) niczym żaba. Z kolei żaba kieruje nas w stronę Przesmyku (Szyi), gdzie żyją ‘żabojady’.

Zwróćcie uwagę na zdanie ‘cały świat zadrżał‘ – z całą pewnością to nasi olbrzymi budzący się w ziemi, i to dokładnie w chwili, gdy Tyrion spada z nieba i ląduje na ziemi. Tymczasem ogromny człowiek z północy który go powalił, stoi tuż nad nim z orbitującą gwiazdą poranną i dudniącym głosem. Oczywiście, Tyrionowi udaje się odwrócić bieg rzeczy, gdy wstaje i przez przypadek zabija konia swojego przeciwnika, sprawiając, że rumak pada na swojego jeźdźca i… łamie jego ramię.

Szczególnie godnym uwagi jest to, że wspomniana bitwa rozegrała się nad Zielonymi Widłami, a nad tą samą rzeką potęzny młot bojowy Roberta powalił smoka w czarnej jak noc zbroi. Wydarzenie to jest ważne nie tylko dlatego, że pojawia się w nim słynny młot i czarny smok wpadający do wody – ale również dlatego, że rozgrywa się w zbiorniku wodnym położonym pomiędzy dwoma lądami. To miejsce nazywa się teraz Rubinowym Brodem. Tak samo ma się sprawa z pojedynkiem Area i Arysa, tego podczas którego Oakheart odnosi rany ramienia i szyi – ser Arys zostaje posiekany gdy on i jego rumak przeskakują przez rzekę, by wylądować na pokładzie łodzi. Również walka ser Duncana i ser Lucasa Longincha miała miejsce w strumieniu rozdzielającym ziemie dwóch rywali. Przyczyna tego wszystkiego jest jasna – Ramię Dorne to przejście, pomost lądowy. Umiejscowianie metafor Młota Wód w pobliżu przejścia przez wodę po prostu dodaje szczegółów do takiego szablonu, a wszystkie sytuacje gdy się pojawiają są całkiem spójne. Ponadto, zwróćcie uwagę na przeróżne złamane mosty, i mosty w ogóle – to ten sam motyw. Ramię Dorne było pomostem lądowym.

A teraz, oto relacja z pojednyku Roberta i Rhaegara, pochodząca z rozdziału Eddarda w Grze o tron:

Przybyli do brodu rzeki Trident, kiedy wokół szalała bitwa. Robert ze swym ogromnym młotem, w hełmie z rogami, natomiast targaryeński książę w czarnej zbroi. Na jego napierśniku widniał rodowy herb, trzygłowy smok, ozdobiony rubinami, które w blasku słońca migotały jak płomyki ognia. Czerwone wody Tridentu kipiały wokół kopyt ich wierzchowców, kiedy objeżdżali się i zadawali ciosy raz po raz, aż wreszcie druzgocący młot Roberta dosięgnął smoka i piersi, którą skrywał. Kiedy Ned dotarł na miejsce walki, Rhaegar leżał martwy w wodzie, a żołnierze obu armii brodzili w kotłującej się wodzie w poszukiwaniu rubinów, które posypały się ze zbroi pokonanego.

Zawsze podobało mi się zdanie o młocie Roberta ‘dosiegającym’ smoka (w oryginale użyte jest tutaj stove, rozwala, ale również palenisko) – smok reprezentuje tutaj drugi księzyc, a drugi księżyc miał w sobie coś z paleniska, że się tak wyrażę. A zatem, mamy tutaj młot druzgoczący smoka, który wpada do wody, a nie ‘młot-smoka’ który ląduje w wodzie, ale z punktu widzenia symboliki, wzór zostaje zachowany. Rhaegar jest martwym i zakrwawionym czarnym smokiem, o ‘czarnym sercu’ leżącym w wodzie pośrodku brodu, tak jak wyspa Krwawy Kamień położona w miejscu przeprawy przez Wąskie Morze, pośród Stopni. Krew i ogniste rubiny Rhaegara wpadają do Zielonych Wideł, dajac nam obraz ognistych krwawników spadających z nieba i lądujących w wodzie, w tym samym miejscu gdzie upadł młot. Widzimy tutaj również pierwotne kolory krwawnika – pasemka czerwonej krwi i rubiny na zieleni (Zielonych Wideł). Dokładnie tak sam obraz tworzy ścięta przez Area Hotaha zakrwawiona głowa ser Arysa, która wpada do rzeki o nazwie Zielona Krew (Greenblood). Pojawia się wówczas następujące zdanie: ‘Zielona Krew z pluskiem pochłonęła czerwoną…’ Rhaegar przedstawia również motyw krwawnika zanurzonego w wodzie, by sprawić żeby wyglądała jak krew, sztuczkę którą często widzimy w odniesieniu do morskiego smoka.

Księżniczce i Królowej, krótkim opowiadaniu George’a o niesławnej wojnie domowej Targaryenów, znanej jako ‘Taniec Smoków’, dowiadujemy się, że Daemon Targaryen, jeżdżący na Krwawej Żmii (Bloodwyrm), ustanowił samego siebie Królem Wąskiego Morza, a za swoją siedzibę obrał Krwawy Kamień (Bloodstone) – świetnie. Daemon zachowuje się tutaj trochę jak uzurpator, co również świetnie pasuje – a uzurpuje coś należącego się jego rodzeństwu, tak jak Krwawnikowy Cesarz przywłaszczył sobie tron należacy do siostry, Ametystowej Cesarzowej. Żmije/wije (wyrms) i węże, podobnie jak smoki, można stosować zamiennie, jeśli chodzi o symbolikę – a zatem, czerwony smok znany jako Krwawa Żmija świetnie pasuje do ‘Czerwonej Żmii’, Oberyna Martella – i oczywiście, również do motywu płonącego czerwonego miecza. Oręż należący do Daemona nazywał się Mroczna Siostra – od dawna podejrzewam, że nazwa ta odnosi się do drugiego księżyca, mrocznej siostry tego, który pozostał.

Daemon używa Mrocznej Siostry, by oślepić swojego siostrzeńca, Aemonda ‘Jednookiego’ Targaryena, podczas pojedynku na smoczych grzbietach nad Okiem Boga, co pasuje do szerszego motywu księżyca (a czasem słońca), któremu wykute zostaje oko – oraz wyobrażenia, że spadające meteory są jak ogniste oczy. Istnieje również inny członek tej ‘rodziny symboli, a jest nim motyw Oka Boga, ale ten temat musimy odłożyć na inny esej. Ten odcinek jest już w większej części napisany i powinien wkrótce się pojawić, więc wyglądajcie go.

W smoczym tańcu Daemona z Aemondem Jednookim najbardziej godny uwagi jest moment, gdy smoki spadają niczym gromy i lądują w wodzie. To szczególnie przekonywująca symbolika, ponieważ w jednym obrazie łączy piorun i morskiego smoka:

Atak nadszedł niespodziewanie, jak uderzenie gromu. Caraxes opadła na Vhagar z przeszywającym krzykiem, który słyszano w odległości kilkunastu mil. Osłaniał ją blask zachodzącego słońca i nadleciała od ślepiej strony księcia Aemonda. Krwawa Żmija uderzyła w starszą smoczycę ze straszliwym impetem. Ryki niosły się echem nad całym Okiem Boga, gdy obie bestie zwarły się i szarpały ze sobą, ciemne na tle krwawoczerwonego nieba. Ich płomienie były tak jasne, że rybacy na dole obawiali się, że to pożar ogarnął same chmury.

Caraxes, Krwawa Żmija, atakuje gdy jest skryta w blasku słońca – a to znaczy, że smoczyca znajduje się pomiędzy Aemondem Jednookim i jego smoczycą, co tworzy smocze zaćmienie, o zachodzie słońca. Mamy ciemność na tle krwawoczerwonego nieba, co przywodzi na myśl Drogona jako ciemny kształt na słonecznym dysku oraz Ciemną Gwiazdę na tle zachodzącego (‘umierającego’) słońca – a także niebieskie róże Lyanny, fruwające po krwawym niebie. Ta jedna scena daje nam cały obraz – smocze zaćmienie, zachodzące słońce, krew na niebie, chmury stające w płomieniach, smoki spadające jak gromy, a ostatecznie morskiego smoka – jako, że obie smoczyce zczepiają się i wpadają w jezioro. Wyśmienicie.

Zostawiając najlepsze na sam koniec, oto jedna z naszych ostatnich wskazówek sugerujących, że złamanie Ramienia Dorne miało miejsce, gdy wykuwany był Światłonośca. Pochodzi z Alchemicznych Godów Dany. Wspominałem już o niej wcześniej, ale warto ją sobie przypomnięć. A oto ona – drugie smocze jajo pęka na stosie:

I rozległ się drugi trzask, głośny i przenikliwy jak grzmot pioruna…

A potem trzecie:

Buchając jęzorem ognia i dymu trzydzieści stóp w górę, stos zapadł się ostatecznie i runął na nią. Dany weszła odważnie w ognistą zawieruchę i zawołała swoje dzieci.

Trzeci trzask był tak donośny, jakby rozpękł się cały świat.

I wszystko jasne – pękanie tych smoczych jaj reprezentuje pęknięcie księżyca – a widzimy, że jedno jest jak grzmot pioruna, a inne jak ‘złamanie świata’ (breaking of the world). Złamanie świata to całkiem dobry opis uderzenia Młota Wód, które rozdzieliło jeden kontynent na dwa. A upadł w następstwie wydania na świat smoków przez księżyc. Wygląda na to, że również grzmot pioruna można odnieść do obudzenia księżycowych smoków. A wszystko miało miejsce gdy zbliżyła się kometa, gdy szalała burza ogniowa, a dym wzniósł się wysoko na niebie, gdy słońce i księżyc płonęły razem w świętym złączeniu.

Na tym kończę przedstawianie mojej teorii – Młot Wód był księżycowym meteorem, który spadł podczas Długiej Nocy, a raczej wywołał Długą Noc. Jeśli mam rację i tak naprawdę to Azor Ahai był w jakiś sposób odpowiedzialny za zniszczenie księżyca, historia według której to Dzieci Lasu przywołały Młot musi być niepoprawna – o ile nie miała miejsca jakaś współpraca pomiędzy Azorem Ahai a Dziećmi.

O rety, zdaje mi się, że to temat o którym ktoś powinien zrobić podcast… Kto wie, może ktoś zrobi!


 Wykończ go… Śmierć

Jeszcze nie skończyliśmy z Oberynem i Gregorem, więc dokończmy scenę próby walki. Zatrzymaliśmy akcję tuż po tym jak Oberyn w końcu połaskotał Górę swoją zatrutą włócznią. Właśnie od tego momentu teraz rozpoczniemy:

Książę Oberyn zaszedł go od tyłu.
– ELIA Z DORNE! – wrzasnął. Ser Gregor zaczął się obracać, lecz za wolno i zbyt późno. Grot włóczni tym razem wbił się w tył jego kolana. Przebił warstwy kolczugi i skóry, łączące ze sobą płyty na udzie i łydce. Góra zatoczył się, zachwiał i runął twarzą na ziemię. Ogromny miecz wypadł mu z dłoni. Ser Gregor przetoczył się na plecy, powoli i ociężale.

Gregor nadal obraca się jak heliotrop (krwawnik), ale zbyt wolno. Zostaje uderzony od tyłu. Zastanawiam się co to może znaczyć. Czy księżyc został trafiony od tyłu? Czy to żart dotyczący ciemnej strony księżyca? Rany, które Gregor odnosi w ramię oraz szyję odpowiadają obrażeniom planety, ale w Westeros nie ma żadnego miejsca, którego nazwa jest związana z nogą lub kolanem.

W każdym razie, po kolejnym uderzeniu włóczni, ser Gregor pada twarzą na dół, tworząc doskonały obraz ‘księżycowej twarz’ spadającej na ziemię. Zauważyłem, że ‘obrażenie od Młota Wód’ zwykle pojawiają się w chwilach gdy ktoś spada na ziemię lub ma wkrótce spaść. Zgaduję, że dzieje się tak, ponieważ gdy leżą plackiem bardziej przypominają mapę. Jest w tym jakiś sens, prawda? Gregor upadł w taki sposób, że kamienna pięść na jego twarzy uderzyła w ziemię razem z jego twarzą, umacniając przypuszczenie, że pięść należy do rodziny symboli księżycowych meteorów.

Co najważniejsze, jego ogromny miecz ‘wylatuje’ (goes flying) mu z rąk. Doskonale – księżyc zostaje zwalony z nóg i nieba, a dokładnie w tym momencie powinny pokazywać się wielkie latające miecze-Światłonoścy. A nie ma wątpliwości, że to ogromny krwawy miecz. Możemy być pewni, że jego widok spodobałby się Brandonowi.

Prawdę mówiąc, mamy tutaj mnóstwo latającej broni, a na dokładkę również latającego węża:

Dornijczyk odrzucił zniszczoną tarczę¹, ujął włócznię w obie dłonie i oddalił się nieśpiesznie. Góra stęknął i wsparł się na łokciu. Oberyn odwrócił się błyskawicznie² i pobiegł ku leżącemu na ziemi wrogowi.
– EEEEELLLLLLLIIIIIAAAAA! – zawołał, wspierając uderzenie włóczni całym ciężarem ciała. Trzask pękającego jesionowego drzewca brzmiał niemal równnie słodko jak wrzask furii, który wyrwał się z ust Cersei³. Na moment książę Oberyn dostał skrzydeł. Wąż przeskoczył nad Górą. Z brzucha Clegane’a sterczały cztery stopy złamanej włóczni. Książę Oberyn przetoczył się, wstał i otrzepał z kurzu. Odrzucił na bok resztki włóczni i wziął w ręce miecz swego wroga.


¹ – w oryginale flung away his ruined shield
² – Oberyn odwraca się – dosłownie ‘wiruje’ –  ‘szybko jak kot’ (whirled cat-quick)
³ – Cersei’s wail of fury – wail to lament, żałosny płacz, zawodzenie, płacz. Wyraz ten pojawia się w nazwie miecza Widow’s Wail, po polsku Wdowi Płacz


Oberyn odrzucił swoją zniszczoną tarczę, lustro słońca, co doskonale przedstawia słońce niszczące księżyc, który był ‘słonecznym lustrem’, zrzucając go z nieba. To symbol pokrewny do tarczy Gregora, z gwiazdą, która znika, by pojawiły sie trzy czarne psy. Latający wąż do jasne odniesienie do węża, a zdanie o ‘kociej prędkości’ zapewne ma przywodzić na myśl Lwa Nocy i bardziej ogólny motyw solarnego lwa. Wąż ‘przeskakujący nad górą’ brzmi jak niebiański wąż przelatujący przez ‘sklepienie niebios’ (w oryginale użyte jest tu słowo vault – the snake has vaulted over the Mountain – które oznacza również sklepienie niebieskie/firnament – vault of heaven) i wbijający swoją słoneczną włócznię w pierś ksieżyca, tak jak Światłonośca przebił serce Nissy Nissy.

Pojawia się tu również obraz komety pękającej na kilka części: latający wąż Oberyn i jego wijąca się słoneczna włócznia są jednym aż do uderzenia w księżycową górę, ale rozdzielają się, gdy Oberyn pozostawia oręż w piersi Gregora i przelatuje nad nim. To dokładny obraz pękającej komety, której jedna połowa uderza w księżyc, zaś druga przelatuje przez burzę ognia. Sądzę, że to bardzo ładna i szczegółowa paralela. Sama włócznia również pęka, dając nam kolejną wersję motywu dzielącej się komety.

Głośny trzask drzewca włóczni, który słychać gdy nadziewa się na niego nasz księżycowy bohater, przywodzi na myśl głośne trzaski, które słyszeliśmy w scenie Alchemicznych Godów Dany. Jeden był ‘głośny jak gdyby rozpękł się cały świat’, a drugi ‘głośny i przenikliwy jak grzmot pioruna’. Zwróćcie również uwagę na to, że pojawia sie wzmianka o tym, że trzask drzewca jest słodki jak wrzask Cersei. Cersei jest wdową, więc jej ‘płacz’ (wail) rzeczywiście jest ‘wdowim płaczem’ (widow’s wail) boleści (of anguish). Tym razem nie ma ekstazy, niestety Cersei… A tak właściwie, ekstaza również zostaje zasugerowana, ponieważ ten sam dźwięk, który doprowadza Cersei do szału, dla Tyriona jest źródłem słodkiej radości.

Po zderzeniu, słoneczny wojownik Oberyn ‘wstał’ (rose), tak jak słońce, ale był zakurzony, więc musiał strzepać z siebie pył. To wygląda jak słońce, zakryte przez chmury popiołu i pyłu, powstałych w wyniku księżycowego zderzenia, a strzepnięcie pyłu przywodzi na myśl popiół i szczątki pochodzące z połączenia słońca i ksieżyca napełniające powietrze.

W końcu, słoneczny wojownik Oberyn podnosi miecz, który wypadł z księżyca. To Krwawnikowy Cesarz Azor Ahai, wykouwający swój oręż z kawałka księżyca. Jest to bardzo ważny szczegół, więc powtórzę raz jeszcze: po tym jak księżyc uderza w ziemię, Czerwona Żmija podchodzi i podnosi miecz, który przybył z księżyca.

A teraz makabryczne zakończenie pojedynku:

Ser Gregor spróbował się podnieść. Złamana włócznia przeszyła go na wylot i przyszpiliła do ziemi. Złapał obiema rękami za drzewce i stęknął z wysiłku, lecz nie był w stanie go wyciągnąć. Kałuża czerwieni pod nim robiła się coraz większa.

Księżyc spadł na dół i nie może już wzejść. Już nie widać go na niebie – zniknął, utknął na ziemi. Pod Gregorem pojawia się ‘kałuża czerwieni’, która z każdą chwilą robi się coraz większa, co przedstawia księżycową krew i księżycową powódź, motywy które szczegółowo omówiliśmy w trzecim odcinku. Ale gdy nasz Krwawnikowy Cesarz zamierza zakończyć sprawę, podnosząc Światłonoścę… nadchodzi zemsta księżyca:

Clegane uniósł błyskawicznie rękę i złapał Dornijczyka poniżej kolana. Czerwona Żmija ciął jak szalony mieczem, stracił jednak równowagę i ostrze zrobiło tylko kolejne wgniecenie w zarękawiu zbroi Góry. Potem Dornijczyk zapomniał o mieczu. Gregor szerpnął gwałtownie ręką, obalając go na siebie.

A potem miecz został zapomniany’ (And then the sword was forgotten) – zgaduję, że to znaczy, że nigdy nie zostanie odnaleziony oryginalny czarny miecz Azora Ahai. A może po prostu przez cały czas ukrywa się na widoku, ale wszyscy zapomnieli czym naprawdę jest?

A zatem, w katastrofie Długiej Nocy księżycowe meteory uderzają w ziemię, ale napełniają powietrze dymem i odłamkami, przez co słońce zostaje zakryte. To obustronne zniszczenie o którym wspominałem. Najpierw słońce zabija księżyc, ale księżyc sięga zza grobu i kontratakuje – tak jak śmiertelnie ranny Gregor wyciąga pięść i obala Oberyna. Przynajmniej można tak na to spojrzeć i właśnie taka interpretacja zostaje nam tu przedstawiona.

Pamiętajcie jednak o tym, że słońce nie zostaje tak po prostu zabite, lecz przemienione w słońce nocy, czarne słońce, czarną dziurę, ciemną gwiazdę itp. – chyba można je również nazwać martwym słońcem. Poza dymem i szczątkami, które powstały w wyniku uderzeń meteorów w planetę, chmura dymu i popiołu stopniowo rozprzestrzeniałaby się z rozbitego księżyca, niczym fale nocy, które zakrywają twarz słońca i przemieniają je w mroczne słońce Długiej Nocy. Taką samą rozprzestrzeniającą się ciemność pokazuje nam armia lorda Tywina, rozpościerająca się jak żelazna róża. To jedna z twarzy Światłonoścy, którą można nazwać aspektem ‘miecz cienia’. To wszystko sugeruje, że wykucie Światłonoścy przemieniło nie tylko Nissę Nissę, ale również Azora Ahai. Oczywiście, magia krwi nie przychodzi za darmo. Wygląda na to, że Azor Ahai zmienił się w wyniku swoich mrocznych czynów. Przypomnijcie sobie, że zgrzyt stali, który dało się syszeć po uderzeniu włóczni w pierś księżycowego bohatera, spawił, że Oberyn się zatoczył – to ten sam motyw.

Kilka innych rzeczy potwierdza pomysł, że zemsta księżyca przybiera formę chmur dymu i pyłu. Zwróćcie uwagę na złamaną włócznię, która zostaje wbita w pierś Góry – to cztery stopy jesionu/popiołu (four feet of ash, ash – jesion, ale również popiół). Przypomina słup dymu, wychodzący z upadłej kamiennej skały. A jest jeszcze jeden dowód, w chwilę później, tuż przed śmiertelnym ciosem:

Gdy uniósł potężną pięść, wydawało się, że krew na stalowej rękawicy zamieniła się w dym w zimnym porannym powietrzu.

Pięść Gregora reprezentuje motyw kamiennej pięści – a jest pokryta krwią i dymiąca – to krwawy, dymiący krwawnik, i tak jak wbita włócznia z jesionu, przedstawia słup dymu wychodzący z samego Gregora. To właśnie jego zakrwawiona, dymiąca włócznia obala słońce i rozbija jego twarz. Oszczędzę Wam tego fragmentu, wszyscy wiemy jak to się kończy. Uważam, że lunarną zemstą, która zabija słońce, jest dym, który wzniósł się po uderzeniach księżycowych meteorów. Zauważycie, że w scenie Alchemicznych Godów, pojawia się wzmianka o tym, że słup dymu wzniósł się wysoko w górę, wychodząc ze stosu solarnego króla – a to nie jedyny przykład. Inny widzieliśmy pod koniec pojedynku smoczych jeźdźców, starcia pomiędzy Daemona Targaryena oraz Aemonda Jednookiego, aczkolwiek w ‘wodnej’ postaci:

Pół uderzenia serca później smoki uderzyły o powierzchnię jeziora, wzbijając w górę fontannę dorównującą ponoć wysokością Królewskiemu Stosowi.

Porównując słup wody do wieży o nazwie ‘królewski stos’, George stworzył obraz stosu dymu wznoszącego się wysoko w powietrze. Spadające smoki reprezentują Azora Ahai odrodzonego, mrocznego solarnego króla pod postacią meteoru. Możemy zatem zobaczyć, że gdy monarcha ląduje, wyrzuca w powietrze królewski stos. Pomyślcie o gęstym dymie wznoszącym się z pogrzebowego stosu solarnego króla khala Drogo – widzicie, że to częsty motyw. Jako bonus, wspomnę, że mój przyjaciel z forum Westeros.org, znany jako Mithras, przepowiedział, że skład dzikiego ognia w Królewskiej Przystani zostanie zapalony, a miasto stanie w płomieniach i zostanie zniszczone. Muszę przyznać, że taki scenariusz ma sens i pasuje do symboliki. Widzieliśmy już ‘lądowanie’ króla Stannisa, napełniające powietrze dymem, podczas bitwy nad Czarnym Nurtem, w rozdziale w którym Sansa ma swoją scenę z księżycową krwią w jednej z wież Czerwonej Twierdzy.

Inny świetny przykład słupu dymu wznoszącego się po upadku księżycowego smoczego meteoru można odnaleźć w trzecim opowiadaniu o Dunku i Jaju, Tajemniczym rycerzu, a zatem pojedziemy dalej okrężną drogą, by przyjrzeć się pewnym wydarzeniom z Dunka i Jaja.


Pierwszy album zespołu The Blackfyre Rebellion był świetny, ale cała reszta…

W porządku, zostawmy Oberyna i Gregora jeszcze na moment, niech nadal trwają zamrożeni w czasie, jak w Matrixie. Co do samej walki, już prawie skończyliśmy – musimy tylko podsumować kilka spraw. Tymczasem, pomówmy jeszcze przez chwilę o motywie słupa/kolumny dymu wychodzącej z miejsca uderzenia smocznych księżycowych meteorów. A to oznacza, że nadszedł czas na dyskusję o Dunku i Jaju, ważną dwóch powodów – po pierwsze, to bardzo ważny motyw, a po drugie, wszyscy lubią te opowiadania. Słysząc, że mówię ‘ważny motyw’, przemyślcie to, że w gruncie rzeczy, chodzi tu o mechanizm, który powoduje Długą Noc. To właśnie wyrzucone w górę dymy i popioły zakrywają słońce na niebie, więc jeśli Martin chce żebyśmy doszli do takiego wniosku, musi pokazać nam ten właśnie dym. I rzeczywiście, pojawia się on w wielu scenach. Oto kulminacja Tajemniczego rycerza, Lord Bloodraven przybywający do Białych Murów, by stłumić dość nieudolny Drugi Bunt Blackfyre’ów:

Na koniec drugi Daemon Blackfyre wyjechał za mury sam, ściągnął wodzę przed królewskim zastępem i wyzwał lorda Bloodravena na pojedynek.
– Będę walczył z tobą, z tchórzem Aerysem albo z dowolnym rycerzem, którego wybierzesz.
Jednakże ludzie lorda Bloodravena otoczyli go, ściągnęli z konia i zakuli w złote okowy. Chorągiew, którą niósł, zatknięto w błotnistej ziemi i podpalono. Płonęła przez długi czas. Buchający z niej powykręcany słup dymu można było zobaczyć z odległości wielu mil.

Mamy tu płonącą chorągiew z czarnym smokiem, z której wychodzi powykręcany słup dymu. Pomyślcie o czarnych smoczych meteorach, płonących gdy spadają na ziemię, lądujących, a na koniec posyłając w górę wijące się smugi dymu – to właśnie o to chodzi. W legendzie Żelaznych Ludzi opowiadającej o Szarym Królu kradnącym ogień Boga Sztormów, heros dokonuje tego ognistego rabunku podstępnie sprawiając, że bóstwo ciska swoim potężnym piorunem w drzewo, które staje w płomieniach. A zatem, płonące drzewa są bezpośrednio związane z piorunami – a w powyższej scenie płonący sztandar z czarnym smokiem zostaje ‘zatknięty’ (w oryginale planted, zasadzony) w ziemi, niczym drzewo. Podobnie było z długim mieczem Gregora na początku próby walki. Również czardrzewa, krzyczące drzewa o liściach niczym płomienie, mogą być powiązane z tym motywem płonącego drzewa.

Zaledwie jedną stronę przed tym jak Daemon II Blackfyre, znany jako John Skrzypek, wyjechał za mury, co zakończyło się jego pojmaniem i spaleniem jego chorągwi, pojawia się paralelna scena. Daemon zostaje wysadzony z siodła podczas walki na kopie przez Glendona Balla, który utrzymuje, że jest synem Quentyna Balla, zwanego Kulą Ognistą  (Fireball). Ze wszystkich herbów w Pieśni Lodu i Ognia to właśnie ten należący do Kuli Ognistej najbardziej przypomina kometę – sądzę, że zgodzicie się tu ze mną – przedstawia, dosłownie: kulę ognia mknącą przez czarne jak noc pole. Ten pojedynek pomiędzy pędzącą kulą ognistą a czarnym smokiem stwarza obraz ognistej komety uderzającej w drugi księżyc, ten który staje się czarnymi smokami. Spójrzcie na kolejny fragment:

Gdzieś na wschodzie różowe niebo przeszyła błyskawica. Daemon wbił złote ostrogi w boki swego ogiera i runął naprzód z łoskotem gromu, opuszczając kopię zakończoną śmiercionośnym grotem.

Z zawieruchy wyłania się czarny ogier Daemona, bez jeźdźca, jako że Blackfyre leży twarzą w dół w błocie, a gapie wykrzykują żarty o ‘brązowym smoku’. Czarny smok Daemon zostaje zasadzony w błocie, tak jak jego chorągiew z czarnym smokiem zostaje zasadzona w błocie tuż przed tym jak zostaje podpalona i staje się źródłem słupa dymu. Użyte tu słownictwo doskonale powiązuje błyskawicę z czarnym smokiem – szarża Daemona zostaje opisana jako grzmot będący odpowiedzią na pojawiającego się na niebie pioruna. Nie mam zamiaru dobijać martwego konia, ale sądzę, że to kolejna wskazówka sugerująca, że piorun w micie o Bogu Sztormów i Szarym Królu to czarny księżycowy meteor, smok czarnego ognia (blackfyre).

Teoria utrzymująca, że cała ta scena pokazuje nam lądowanie czarnych meteorów zostaje umocniona nieco później, gdy Dunk udaje się do namiotu Bloodravena i widzi głowy dwóch najważniejszych członków spisku Blackfyre’ów nabite na drzewce. Należą do lorda Gormona Peake’a ze Starpike oraz Czarnego Toma Heddle’a z Białych Murów. Odcięte głowy na włóczniach? Wiemy o co z tym chodzi…

Na początek, rozważmy co znaczy słowo ‘Starpike’. Możliwe, że chodzi o gwiazdę (star), która jest jednocześnie piką (pike), rodzajem włóczni. W takim wypadku mamy tu ‘Gwiezdną Włócznię’. Jeśli chodzi o rybę o nazwie ‘pike’ (szczupaka), mamy gwiazdę, która wpada do morza i staje się rybą. Innymi słowy, morskiego smoka. Na herbie rodu Peake’ów, który Dunk widzi na tarczy wbitej w ziemię przed głowami, widnieją trzy czarne zamki na pomarańczowym polu – więc znów mamy nawiązanie do trójgłowego smoka i trzech czarnych smoczych meteorów. Zamki przywodzą mi na myśl fortece zbudowane z czarnego oleistego kamienia, takie jak Fosa Cailin, Yeen oraz całe miasto Asshai, ale również czarne zamki innych postaci Azora Ahai, takie jak: Smoczą Skałę (Aegon, Rhaegar, Stannis), Czarny Zamek (Jon Snow) oraz Blackhaven (Beric Dondarrion). Czarny Tom Heddle nie posiada żadnego herbu, ale gdy wyrusza do boju, zakłada hełm w kształcie głowy demona, więc jego ścięta głowa również dość mocno przypomina czarne smocze meteory.

Wreszcie, pojawia się wzmianka o tym, że oczy lorda Peake’a są ‘twarde jak małe kamyki’, w oryginale flinty, ‘krzemienne’/’kamienne’  – a oczywiście, krzemień to kamień służący do krzesania ognia. Odnajdujemy również fragment o tym, że wkrótce dobiorą się do nich wrony, co doskonale łączy tę scenę z bezokimi czaszkami w wizji Mielisandre i ściętymi głowami braci Nocnej Straży nadzianymi na włócznie, które również pozbawiono oczu. Nie potrafię sobie przypomnieć czy o tym wspominałem, ale te głowy zostały pozostawione przez dzikiego zwanego ‘Płaczką’. Przydomek zawdzięcza wykłuwaniu oczu swoich ofiar. A to łączy motyw krwawych łez księżyca z podobnymi do włóczni i mieczy meteorami, tak jak w scenie z rozdziału Jona, gdzie Mur ‘płacze’, w wyniku czego powstają pasemka czerwonego ognia i czarnego lodu.

Jest też scena w której Obara, jedna z Piaskowych Węży, opowiada o dniu w którym jej ojciec Oberyn przyjechał by ja zabrać od matki. Czerwona Żmija dał córce wybór: pomiędzy swoją włócznią a łzami jej matki, nazywając go ‘wyborem broni’. Żart polega na tym, że łzy (tears) matki włóczniami (spears). Obara dodaje, że jej matka umarła płacząc… w rzeczy samej.

Kończąc, chciałbym zwrócić uwagę na to, że według Bloodravena, najważniejszym wydarzeniem mającym miejsce podczas turnieju okazało się spełnienie przepowiedni Johna Skrzypka – o smoku wykluwającym się z jaja w Białych Murach. Smokiem tym okazuje się ostatecznie Jajo (Egg), który ujawnia się jako Smok z Rodu Targaryenów. W Białych Murach znajdowało się również dosłowne smocze jajo, ale jeden z karłów komediantów Bloodravena wspiął się w górę szybu wychodka i ukradł je w nocy. Innymi słowy, wszystko na tym turnieju reprezentuje obudzenie smoków z lunarnego jaja – biały zamek o nazwie Białe Mury (Whitewalls) gra rolę skorupki. A zatem, wszystkie symbole które przedstawiłem można bez obaw uznać za odnoszące się do wykucia Światłonoścy  i całej reszty.

Opowiadania o Dunku i Jaju są przepełnione mityczną astronomią, zwłaszcza turniej w Białych Murach, doskonały pod tym względem – a zatem, musimy kiedyś do nich wrócić. Uznałem, że powyższe fragmenty będą tutaj pasowały, ponieważ mowa w nich o lądowaniach czarnych smoczych meteorów, wzbijajacych wysokie słupy dymu. Na dodatek pojawiają się w nich odniesienia do grzmotów i błyskawic, tworzące powiązanie z piorunem Boga Sztormów oraz rzucające się w oczy i już nam dobrze znane odcięte głowy nabite na włócznie. Szukałem pretekstu, by trochę pomówić o Dunku i Jaju, więc oto i on.


Pocałunki, Lament i Ostatni Bohater

W scenie pojedynku Oberyna z Gregorem zostało tylko kilka spraw do omówienia, więc wróćmy teraz do tej zamrożonej w czasie chwili, tuż po tym jak Gregor przyciągnął księcia do siebie, zaledwie kilka sekund przed zadaniem przez Czerwoną Żmiję ciosu, który odciąłby głowę jego przeciwnika. Pierwszym z tych tematów jest aspekt mitu Światłonoścy jako metafory płciowej prokreacji. To, że mamy tu walkę dwóch nieustraszonych wojowników nie sprawia, że George nie jest w stanie niepostrzeżenie wślizgnąć tu motywów związanych z obcowaniem! Założę się, że nawet nie pamiętacie, że pojawiają się tam następujące zdania (może byliście zbyt zajęci wymiotowaniem albo gwałtownym płaczem) – a zatem, oto i one:

Przerażony Tyrion zobaczył, że Góra otoczył księcia potężnym ramieniem i przycisnął go do piersi niczym kochanek.
– Elia z Dorne – usłyszeli głos ser Gregora, gdy przeciwnicy byli już tak blisko siebie, że mogliby się pocałować. Jego niski głos niósł się echem pod hełmem.

Mamy tutaj dwa odniesienia do prokreacji, pocałunki oraz bycie kochankami. W takim momencie! I to dokładnie wówczas gdy słońce i księżyc są blisko siebie, tworząc kolejne zaćmienie, w chwili symbolizującej wykucie Światłonoścy. Głos Gregora ‘niesie się echem’, grzmi, huczy (booms) pod hełmem, by pokazać co tak naprawdę tam się działo – to była eksplozja księżyca, wybuch prosto w twarz słońca. Drugi księżyc pocałował słońce, a potem wybuchł, uderzając odłamkami w jego twarz. Bum.

Następnie mamy symboliczne rany, pojawiające się na sam koniec. Tyrion myśli, że nigdy nie dowie się, czy Oberyn ‘zamierzał odrąbać głowę Gregora, czy też wepchnąć sztych przez wizurę jego hełmu’, podczas gdy Gregor wpycha swoje ‘stalowe palce’ w oczy Oberyna tuż przed zmiażdżeniem jego głowy. Obrażenia głowy oraz oślepienie, znane nam już symboliczne urazy, które przydarzają się słońcu i księżycowi. Stalowe palce podkreślają symbolikę kamiennej pięści Góry, która była zakrwawiona i dymiąca – szczególnie palce symbolizują meteory, na przykład w scenie z Benerrem w Czerwonej Świątyni, gdzie władający włóczniami żołnierze są palcami ‘Ognistej Ręki’. Stalowe palce przywodzą na myśl meteory, z których można wykonać stalowe miecze, co ma sporo sensu – a właśnie te palce oślepiają słońce, niszcząc jego twarz. Znów, sądzę, że wzmacnia to teorię, że to właśnie dym księżycowych meteorów zakrył słońce. Zwróćcie uwagę na to, że czarne smocze miecze znane jako valyriańska stal, są ‘ciemne jak dym’ (smoke-dark), wydaje mi się także, że istnieje możliwość, iż każda valyriańska stal zawiera czarny kamień księżycowych meteorytów. Widzimy nawet powiązanie pomiędzy dymem a tymi meteorami, a raczej mieczami symbolizującymi meteory.

Pojawia się również inna godna uwagi rana, czyli wybicie zębów Oberyna przez Górę. Wspominałem kilkukrotnie, że smocze zęby są opisywane jako czarne miecze lub sztylety, a także czarne diamenty – a kły i zęby jadowe Żmii pełnią taką samą rolę. A zatem, wyłamane zęby (splintered teeth) przedstawiają deszcz czarnych meteorów, niesławną nawałnicę mieczy. Oleista słoneczna włócznia Oberyna również została opisana jako ‘rozszczepiona/rozsypana w drzazgi’ (splintered), gdy Oberyn odrzucił ją na bok, po przebiciu Góry. Tak więc, znowo widzimy mocne symboliczne powiązanie, pokazujące nam, że wybite zęby Oberyna i jego roztrzaskana włócznia są tym samym.

Później rozległ się przyprawiający o mdłości chrzęst. Ellaria Sand krzyknęła przerażona, a śniadanie Tyriona trysnęło mu strugą z ust. Padł na kolana, rzygając boczkiem, kiełbasą i szarlotką, a także podwójną porcją jajecznicy z cebulą i ostrą dornijską papryką.

Smażone i gotowane jajka – księżyc był jajem, które zostało poparzone, ścięte, jak widzieliśy, więc nietrudno zrozumieć tę metaforę. Oh, popatrzcie: podwójna porcja – moim zdaniem, ponieważ były dwa ksieżyce. Ogniste dornijskie papryczki – czemu nie. Kiełbasy nie będę komentował. Wzmianka o mdłościach dobrze pasuje do całej tej symboliki związanej z trucizną – i odnosi się do otrutego i chorego księżyca. Lecz najważniejsze jest to, że Ellaria, od niedawna wdowa, wydaje z siebie wdowi płacz/jęk przerażenia (zgaduję, że inna zawodząca wdowa, Cersei, odnalazła teraz na nowo rozkosz).

Co do próby walki, to by było na tle! Coś takiego! Wstańcie teraz i przeciągnijcie nogi, no chyba, że prowadzicie samochód. W takim wypadku to chyba nie najlepszy pomysł.  Everybody Hurts zespołu REM to świetny przerywnik muzyczny, ale dla jadących za wami może okazać się dość irytujący. Odkładając nawiązania do popkultury lat 90-tych na bok, właśnie dotarliśmy do końca pojedynku i samego rozdziału, ale chicałbym teraz przez chwilę zająć się motywem wdowiego płaczu – właśnie dostaliśmy solidną dawkę lamentujących wdów, rozrywających uszy zgrzytów metalu o metal oraz pisków, na dodatek miecz Wdowi Płacz to po prostu kawał świetnej symboliki, związany z wieloma motywami o których już dzisiaj rozmawialiśmy.

Wygląda na to, że wszystkie zawodzące wdowy pojawiające się w scenach wykucia Światłonoścy odnoszą się do krzyku udręki i ekstazy Nissy Nissy, który rozłupał księżyc, oraz do ksieżycowych meteorów postrzeganych jako łzy księżyca. Miecz Wdowi Płacz jest pokryty falami krwi i nocy, które obrazowo opisują nam wszystkie rzeczy przychodzące ze zniszczonego księżyca, co samo w sobie sprawia, że jest mieczem z księżycowych meteorów. Wdowi Płacz i Wierny Przysiędze, wykonane z niemal czarnego miecza Neda zwanego Lodem, reprezentują czarny lód pokryty krwią, kolejne nawiązanie do księżycowych meteorów, które znamy i kochamy. A te są łzami księżyca, dziei czemu widzimy, że Wdowi Płacz do w gruncie rzeczu symbol księżycowych łez, na dodatek nazwany na pamiątkę jego przedśmiertnego jęku.

Zastanówcie się nad cyklem życia Wdowiego Płaczu: zaczyna jako czarny lód, po czym zostaje splamiony pewnego rodzaju krwawą ofiarą. Gdy zostaje podzielony i przekuty, nadal wygląda tak, jakby był pokryty krwią – ale teraz posiada również gardę, która ‘płonie złotem’ i złotą lwią głowicę. Ten ciąg wydarzeń pokazuje nam cykl życiowy czerwonej komety. Zaczyna go jako kometa bez ogona – w gruncie rzeczy kula czarnego lodu i żelaza – a potem zostaje pokryta krwią księżyca, stając się krwawiącą gwiazdą i ostatecznie, zaczyna płonąć czerwonym ogieniem, stająć się ognistą gwiazdą. Zauważycie, że to mniej więcej kolejnośc wydarzeń mających według mitu miejsce przy wykuciu Światonoścy – od dymiącego miecza, przez krwawy miecz, po płonący miecz. Całkiem nieźle, co nie? Miecz Neda zostaje pokryty krwią, a potem pojawia się na nowo jako dwa miecze o płonących rękojeściach, dokładnie tak jak Światłonośca, któy został pokryty krwią ofiar, by mógł zapłonąć. Głowice Wiernego Przysiędze i Wdowiego Płaczu w kształcie lwich głów w szczególności pokazują nam, że miecz musi wcześniej zostać zapłodnionym przez słońce, że musi wypić jego ogień – i rzeczywiście, jak już kilkukrotnie powtarzałem, w pierwszej scenie w której widzimy te dwa miecze pojawia się wzmianka o tym, że piją światło słońca. Zasadniczo, krew i ogień zostają dodane do czarnego lodu, w wyniku czego powstaje Światłonośca, czerwony miecz lub czerwona kometa.

Rozpad komety na dwie części jest podkreślany nie tylko przez rozdzielenie Lodu na dwa czarno-czerwone miecze, ale również przez scenę, w której Pani Kamienne Serce ogląda Wiernego Przysiędze po pojmaniu Brienne: rubinowe oczy lwiej głowy na głowicy miecza wyglądają jak dwie czerwonie gwiazdy. Dwie czerwone gwiazdy – dwie połówki czerwonej komety. Nie potrafię sobie wyobrazić do czego innego mogłyby się odnosić. Skoro – jak się wydaje – stanowią paralelę samego podzielonego miecza, myślę, że to bezpieczny wniosek.

Wspominałem, że złamana włócznia Oberyna to nawiązanie do podzielonej komety, a teraz chcę zauważyć, że te wszystkie rozdzielające się komety mogą tak naprawdę odnosić się do złamanego miecza Ostatniego Bohatera – wydaje mi się, że właśnie on jest tutaj ważny. Płonący miecz Berica pękł w połowie, podobnie jak włócznia Oberyna, miecz Tytana z Braavos, miecz Neda… a miecz Ostatniego Bohatera ponoć pękł z powodu chłodu. Na puruprowych godach pojawia się ciekawe nawiązanie do złamanych miecz-Światłonośców – i być może również Ostatniego Bohatera – w scenie, gdy Joffrey nadaje imię Wdowiemu Płaczowi:

Lord Tywin zaczekał do końca, nim wręczył królowi swój dar: miecz. Wykonaną z drewna wiśni, złota oraz impregnowanej czerwonej skóry pochwę zdobiły złote ćwieki w kształcie lwich głów. Sansa zauważyła, że wszystkie mają oczy z rubinów. Gdy Joffrey wydobył oręż i uniósł go nad głowę, w sali balowej zapadła cisza. Pokryta czerwonymi i czarnymi zmarszczkami stal lśniła w świetle poranka.

Miecz poranka? Z całą pewnością nie jest to biały miecz, a z Joffreya żaden biały rycerz. Czy to znaczy, że miecz Ostatniego Bohatera był czarny, niepodobny do białego oręża znanego jako Miecz Poranka, Świt? Nieustannie powracam to tego pomysłu – wygląda na to, że nie mogło być inaczej. Zakrwawiona pięść Gregora dymiła w ‘chłodnym powietrzu poranka’, więc może rzeczywiście coś w tym jest. A może, to po prostu odniesienie do Wojny Świtu – coś podobnego widzieliśmy podczas Bitwy nad Zielonymi Widłami, gdzie armia Tywina rozwineła się w świetle świtu niczym żelazna róża o lśniących kolcach. W tamtej scenie ludzi z Północy reprezentowali głównie Karstarkowie, nazywani ‘wilkami białej gwiazdy’, ponieważ ich herb przedstawia białe słońce zimy. To właśnie ta bitwa, podczas której Tyrion zostaje uderzony przez ‘gwiazdę poranną’ (morgensztern). Chodzi o to, że po jednej stronie widzimy białe miecze i symbole gwiazdy porannej, a po drugiej, wśród sił mrocznego solarnego króla, czarne żelazo. To Wojna Świtu. Nie sądzę zatem, że każda broń lśniąća w świetle porananka musi być symbolem miecza poranka, choć zawże warto to rozważyć.

W każdym razie, miło zobaczyć trochę oleju w Wiernym Przysiedze – naoliwioną (w oryginale oiled) pochwę z czerwonej skóry. Składa się również z ‘drewna wiśni’ (cherrywood), co może sugerować spalone drewno, ponieważ rozżarzony węgielek w ogniu może być nazwany cherry, a wiśniowe drewno jest zazwyczaj czerwone. I jak zwykle, pojawia się wzmianka o czerwonych i czarnych zmarszczkach Wdowiego Płaczu. Scena trwa nadal:

 – Wspaniały – oznajmił Mathis Rowan.
– Miecz godny pieśni – rzekł lord Redwyne.
– Królewska broń – dodał ser Kevan Lannister.

Królewski miecz, słoneczny miecz, miecz związany z pieśnią. Rozmawialiśmy już o motywie śpiewu i o tym jak odnosi się do smoków i księżyca. Oczywiście, mamy księżycowe śpiewaczki (Moonsingers) Jogos Nhai, wyznawców Kultu Gwieździstej Mądrości, którzy śpiewają do gwiazd, oraz wilkory śpiewające gwiazdiom, a ostatnie zdanie Gry o tron brzmi: po raz pierwszy od setek lat noc ożyła muzyką smoków. Sądzę, żę róg ‘Władca Smoków’ (Dragonbinder) oraz motywy ‘okrzyku boleści i ekstazy’ oraz Wdowego Płaczu również wpasowują się w tę symbolikę. Innym razem lepiej przyjrzymy się motywom związanym z dźwiękiem. Tymczasem, kontynuujmy tę scenę:

Król Joffrey był tak podekscytowany, że wydawało się, iż ma ochotę natychmiast kogoś zabić. Ze śmiechem przeszył mieczem powietrze.
– Wspaniały oręż wymaga wspaniałego imienia, panowie! Jak mam go nazwać?
Sansa przypomniała sobie Lwi Kieł, miecz, który Arya wyrzuciła do Tridentu, oraz Pożeracza Serc, którego kazał jej pocałować przed bitwą. Zastanawiała się, czy Margaery też będzie musiała całować miecz.

Zmuszanie księżycowych dziewic do całowania słonecznych mieczy to właśnie to czym zajmuje się słońce – mamy tu świetny przykład takiej symboliki. Wrzucanie mieczy będących jak kły lub zęby do rzeki… ahoj morski smoku!

Goście wykrzykiwali proponowane nazwy, lecz Joffrey odrzucił chyba z tuzin nim wreszcie usłyszał taką, która przypadła mu do gustu.
– Wdowi Płacz! – krzyknął. – Tak jest! Wiele kobiet uczyni wdowami! – Znowu machnął mieczem. – A gdy spotkam stryja Stannisa, przetnę jego magiczny oręż wpół.
Joff spróbował wyprowadzić cięcie w dół, zmuszając ser Balona Swanna do pośpiesznego kroku w tył. Na widok miny ser Balona sala ryknęła śmiechem.

Sugerowałem już wcześniej, że Balon Swann to zapewne księżycowa postać – a tu niemal zostaje ugodzony przez czarny miecz słońca – wygląd jego ‘twarzy’ jest ponoć szczególnie zabawny. Co do motywu złamanego Światłonoścy, pojawia się tutaj dwukrotnie. Miecz Neda reprezentuje Światłonoścę podzielonego na dwie części, a Joffrey sugeruje, że przetnie miecz Stannisa wpół.

Mamy również kolejną wskazówkę co do tego, że Ostatni Bohater i prawdopodbnie jego drugi miecz wykonany ze smoczej stali są blisko związani z Azorem Ahai i jego ognistym mieczem. Zaważycie, że Joffrey odrzucił dwanaście nazw przed wybraniem kolejnej – a za każdym razem gdy widzimy ten wzór 12+1, zaczynam myśleć o Ostatnim Bohaterze, którego dwunastu towarzyszy zginęło podczas wyprawy. Widzimy tutaj złamane miecze-Światłonośców razem z ‘matematyką Ostatniego Bohatera’, więc skłaniam się ku temu, że istnieje pomiędzy nimi związek.

W rzeczy samej, Joffrey pokazuje nam więcej matematyki Ostatniego Bohatera w śnie Jaime’a na pieńku czardrzewa. Jaime znajdue się w podziemiach Casterly Rock, a on i Brienne władają identycznymi płonącymi mieczami. To trochę tak jakby to był jeden podzielony miecz, zwłąszcza z tego powodu, że najpierw przez pewien czas widzimy jeden miecz, a w chwilę potem pojawiają się dwa. Pomyślcie o tym, że Wierny Przysiędze i Wdowi Płacz są bliźniaczymi mieczami powstałymi z jednego. Fale krwawej czerwieni i nocnej czerni Wiernego Przysiędze doskonale kontrastują z bladymi, srebrno-niebieskimi płomienami mieczy Jaime’a i Brienne. W każdym razie, to zdanie brzmi następująco:

Był tam również Joffrey, syn, którego wspólnie spłodzili, a za nimi tuzin ciemniejszych postaci o złotych włosach.

Jak na razie, moim najlepszym pomysłem na temat Ostatniego Bohatera jest to, że jest synem Azora Ahai – Azorem Ahai narodzonym na nowo jako dziecko wypełniające dziedzictwo swego ojca – a być może, działającym wbrew temu dziedzictwu. Bez względu na to, który pomysł jest poprawny, patrzenie na Jaime’a jak na Azora Ahai jest tutaj kuszące, ponieważ włada płonącym mieczem i odniósł ważne obrażenia ręki i oka (jak na przykład Jon Snow). Podobnie jest z patrzeniem jego syna Joffreya jak na Ostatniego Bohatera, prowadzącego dwanaście ciemnych kształtów, które w pewien sposób go przypominają. Dwunastu towarzyszy Ostatniego Bohatera zginęło, więc może takie jest znaczenie tego, że dwanaście kształtów za Joffreyem to cienie.

Joffrey jest, że się tak wyrażę, synem słońa, dokładnie tak jak Quentyn Martell, który jest nazywany ‘synem słońca’, ponieważ jest synem słońca Dorne w ogólnym znaczeniu, a w szczególności synem władcy Dorne. Uważam, że ten motyw ‘syna słońca’ (sun’s son) jest tym samym co motyw ‘drugiego syna’ (second sun), który widzimy tu i ówdzie. (W języku angielskim słońce,- sun – brzmi podobnie do son, syn). Komety i meteory, w naszej opowieści dzieci słońca, rzeczywście mogą rozświetlić niebo tak bardzo, że wydają się być drugim słońcem na niebie, tak jak w legendzie ludu Ojibwa o ‘Długo-Ogoniastej-Gwieździe-Wspinającej-się-Po-Niebiosach’, którą omawialiśmy w ostatnim odcinku. George robi coś podobnego, gdy opisuje pożar po katastrofie w Hardhome 600 lat wcześniej, nazywając go: ‘tak gorącym, że obserwatorzy stojący na położonym daleko na południe Murze myśleli, że słońce wstaje na północy’. Innym razem przyjrzymy się dokładniej motywowi drugiego słońca, ale na razie, wspomnę jedynie, że chorągiew kompanii najemników znanej jako ‘Drudzy Synowe’ (Second Suns) jest… (czekajcie na to)… złamany miecz.

Dun dun dun.

Oczywiście, wiem co teraz powiecie, Joffrey nie jest zbyt bohaterski – rzeczywiście, z pewnością nie jest. Jest sadystą i wyrasta na psychopatę. Jednak, kilka rzeczy związanych z Joffreyem wydaje odnosić się do Ostatniego Bohatera. Umarł gdy miał trzynaście lat, a czerwona kometa pojawiła się na niebie w poranek jego trzynastego dnia imienia. Królewkie lizusy z Czerwonej Twierdzy nazwały ją Kometą Joffreya. Niektórzy uważają, że Ostatni Bohater był tą samą osobą co Nocny Król, trzynasty Lord Dowódca, który rządził przez trzynaście lat nim został obalony – w ten sposób powstaje powiązanie pomiędzy tymi trzynastkami i Ostatnim Bohaterem stojącym na czele grupy trznastu (dwunastu towarzyszy plus on sam). Być może psychopatyczna natura Joffreya to wskazówka co do tego, że Ostatni Bohater stał się Nocnym Królem i popełnił mroczne czyny.

W każdym razie, poza powiązaniem z czerwoną kometą, Joffrey włada Wdowim Płaczem, idealnym mieczem dla odrodzonego Azora Ahai. Dwa miecze które posiadał przez otrzymaniem Wdowiego Płaczu również opowiadają ciekawą historię. Najpierw miał Lwi Kieł, który został wrzucony do rzeki – tak, to zabawna scena, ale pokazuje nam również symbol meteora-jako-kła ciśnięty do wody, niczym morski smok. Jego drugim mieczem był Pożeracz Sec, który wydaje się dobrym symbolem komety, która przebiła serce księżyca, a być może również odległym echem sceny w której Daenerys zjada serce konia, które również reprezentowało kometę.

Teraz muszę wspomnieć o tym, że po prostu nie jestem w stanie nie dostrzegać w tej sekwencji trzech mieczy, którą kończy miecz nocy, ognia i krwi, opowieści o Azorze Ahai wykuwającym trzy miecze. Trzy próby zahartowania oręża miały miejsce w wodzie, sercu lwa i ostatecznie w Nissie Nissie – a miecze Joffreya stanowią ich paralelę. Pierwszy miecz został wrzucony do rzeki, więc mamy wodę. Drugi, Pożeracz Serc, miał na głowni lwią głowę. No coż, wszystkie trzy miecze mają lwią symbolikę, więc to niezbyt pomocne. Jednakże, głowica Pożeracza Serc przedstawia lwa z rubinowym sercem pomiędzy szczękami – tak więc, przy grugim mieczy rzeczywiście pojawia się bezpośrednie nawiązanie do lwiego serca. A potem pojawia się trzeci miecz, Wdowi Płacz, z dwoma czerwonymi gwiazdami oczu i całą tą symboliką krwi, nocy i lamentu, którą już omówiłem. Dwanaście proponowanych nazw takiego królewskiego miecza do niego nie pasuje, ale trzynasta trafia prosto w cel.

Czerwona gwiazdy-oczy są tym samym co czerwone oczy-słońca, a być może przypominacie sobie, że czerwone oczy Ducha zostały opisane jako ‘dwa czerwone słońca’ w scenie z Nawałnicy mieczy. Zarówno Duch, jak i Jon Snow posiadają symbolikę Ostatniego Bohatera, więc to, że widzimy u nich motyw drugiego słońca wydaje się ciekawe. Jeśli teoria R+L=J jest prawdziwa, Jon jest drugim synem Rhaegara, a Tyrion byłby drugim synem Aerysa jeśłi to rzeczywiście Szalony Król jest jego ojcem. Wierny Przysiędze to czarny miecz o dwóch gwiazdach-oczach, podczas gdy Duch jest białym wilkiem o dwóch oczach jak czerwone gwiazdy. I znów, to wszystko sprawia, że zaczynam się zastanawiać, czy ‘miecz poranka’ był czarnym czy białym mieczem. Zastanówcie się: Jon śni o władaniu mieczem swego ojca, ‘Czarnym Lodem’, posiada czarny miecz Długi Pazur, a w innym śnie włada czerwonym mieczem i nosi zbroję z czarnego lodu. A zatem, powinien władać czarny miecz, prawda? Z drugiej strony, Jon jest silnie związany z Mieczem Poranka, jak wykazała moja przyjaciółka Sly Wren w jej świetnym eseju opublikowanym na Westeros.org pod tytułem ”Od Śmierci po Świt: Jon powstanie jako Miecz Poranka”. Nawet jego czarny miecz posiada wilczą głowę z ‘bladego kamienia’ jako głowicę, co przywodzi na myśl blady kamień, z którego ponoć jest wykonany Świt. A na dodatek, w jakiś sposób połączy ze swoim białym wilkiem, więc… powinien władać białym mieczem!

Jak mówiłem, dostrzegam dowody na poparcie każdej opcji, więc tak naprawdę nie wiem jak ma być. Nie możemy wykluczyć jakiegoś dziwnego połączenia dwóch złamanych mieczy, co pasowałoby do ogólnej taoistycznej filozofii – yin i yang – mówiącej o równowadze przeciwieństw, która przenika całą serię.

I właśnie na tym kończy się nasza mała wyprawa w tematykę Ostatniego Bohatera. Z całą pewnością wspomnimy o nim tu i ówdzie na przestrzeni całych esejów, w końcu jest jedną z najbardziej enigmatycznych zagadek starożytnego Westeros. Jestem pewien, że w końcu odkryjemy prawdę o Ostatnim Bohaterze, choć z całą pewnością musimy jeszcze spojrzeć na niego pod kątem rodu Starków. Na razie, widzimy, że motyw złamanej broni-Światłonoścy konsekwentnie pojawia się obok wzoru 12+1 Ostatniego Bohatera – i obok postaci reprezentujących Azora Ahai odrodzonego. Ostatni Bohater miał ponoć złamany miecz, więc wygląda na to, że wszystko ładnie się sumuje… do trzynastki.


Wesele, Pogrzeb… i Zemsta 

Zatem, w tym momencie każda rozsądna osoba zakończyłaby ten podcast. I jeśli chcecie, możecie udawać, że jestem rozsądną osobą i wyłączyć właśnie teraz! Jednakże, zawsze byłem miłośnikiem długich książek (choćby tych pięciu, których zapewne Wy również jesteście wielkimi fanami), długich piosenek, długich albumów… album Passion Play zespołu Jethro Tull w którym znajduje się tylko jedna piosenka doskonale odpowiada takiemu opisowi, podobnie jak ponad piętnastominutowe utwory Mars Volta, King Crimson, Tool, Pink Floyd i inne podobne kawałki, zawsze podobały mi się również długie podcasty, na przykład rewelacyjna Hardcore History Dana Carlina, a także długie zdania, na przykład to do którego końca właśnie się zbliżam. W takim razie, ponieważ nadal ‘mam na to ochotę’, przygotowałem dla Was jeszcze trochę mitycznej astronomii. Mogłem to wszystko wyciąć i zachować na inny esej – tak sugerował głos rozsądku – ale rzecz w tym, że akurat ten temat ma związek z próbą walki i symbolami, które przed chwilą omówiliśmy. A więc, dopóki macie to wszystko świeżo w pamięci, dysponujecie kontekstem potrzebnym do zrozumienia co tak naprawdę dzieje się z siateczką na włosy Sansy i o co chodzi w Purpurowych Godach. Jeśli chcecie, możecie zrobić pauzę i wrócić do tego podcastu później, udając że to kolejny odcinek. Przyadłby mi się dobry redaktor.

Teraz gdy zmusiłem mój głos rozsądku do zamilknięcia, porozmawiajmy o Purpurowych Godach i Sansie Stark, ksieżycowej dziewicy – Meduzie. Już wcześniej porozmawialiśmy co nieco o tym weselu, ponieważ miało ogromny wpływ na pojedynek Oberyna i Gregora – w końcu próba walki to bezpośrednia konsekwencja Purpurowych Godów. Na począktu walki pojawia się ciekawe zdanie, które odsyła nas prosto do wesela Joffreya, a dokładniej do siateczki Sansy. Tuż przed rozpoczęciem starcia pomiędzy Gregorem i Oberynem, Tyrion w następujący sposób obserwuje otoczenie:

Niektórzy przywlekli ze sobą krzesła, by usiąść na nich wygodnie, inni zaś siedzieli na beczkach. Trzeba było urządzić tę walkę w Smoczej Jamie – pomyślał skwaszony Tyrion. Moglibyśmy brać za wstęp po grosiku i zwróciłyby się nam koszty zarówno ślubu, jak i pogrzebu Joffreya.

Pieśni Lodu i Ognia miedziane grosze (copper pennies) są również nazywane gwiazdami, widzimy zatem motyw głów jako symboli gwiazd i ciał niebieskich. (W oryginale Tyrion chce ‘brać po grosiku za głowę’). Smocza Jama to świetny symbol zniszczonego księżyca – była domem smoków, który zotał zniszczony w wielkim pożarze i runął. Tak jak słońce miało dwie księżycowe boginie-żony, Aegon miał Rhaenys i Visenyę. I oczywiście, Smocza Jama stoi na Wzgórzu Rhaenys, która zmarła wcześnie, zabita gdy spadła ze smoka w Hellholcie. Smocza księżniczka spadająća z nieba razem ze swoim smokiem – to nasza symbolika spadającej księżycowej dziewicy. Jej smok Meraxes został trafiony w oko, co przywodzi na myśl legendę o Serwynie, który przebił oko smoka Urraxa włócznią. Jak już wspominałem, w przyszłości napiszę esej o tych dwóch księżycach. Wspominam o tym teraz, ponieważ ważne jest to, że Rhaenys była małżonką ‘ognistym księżycem’ Aegona, a cała jej symbolika pasuje do zniszczonego drugiego księżyca. Smocza Jama położona na Wzgórzu Rhaenys jest tego najlepszym przykładem – a zatem, wzmianka o zorganizowaniu próby walki w tym właśnie miejscu to po prostu inny sposób zasygnalizowania nam, co tak naprawdę pokazuje pojedynek Oberyna i Gregora – zniszczenie drugiego księżyca. Na dodatek, Góra zabił podobno księżniczkę Rhaenys, córkę Elii i Rhaegara, która otrzymała imię na cześć pierwszej Rhaenys, co daje nam kolejne powiązanie pomiędzy tymi postaciami i drugim księżycem.

W powyższym fragmencie ważne jest również to, że Joffrey, inny solarny król, ma wesele i pogrzeb które są ze sobą powiązane. Joff zmarł podczas swojego wesela, tak jak słońce zginęło podczas zbliżenia z drugim księżycem, i tak jak Oberyn i Gregor zabijają się nawzajem podczas pojedynku. Gdy Joffrey został otruty, jego solarna twarz pociemniała, a trucizna pochodziła od innej księżycowej dziewicy – Sansy. To przedstawienie fal nocy (chmury odłamków księżyca), które przesłoniły twarz słońca – zemsty księżyca, o której już mówiliśmy. Gdy Dontos wręcza Sansie siateczkę na włosy zawierającą truciznę i prosi, by założyła ją na ślub Joffreya, mówi jej ‘trzymasz zemstę‘.

Odzwierciedleniem pociemniałej z powodu trucizny twarzy Joffreya jest reakcja Tywina na początku rozdziału o pojedynku Oberyna i Gregora, po tym jak Tyrion ogłasza, że domaga się próby walki:

Twarz lorda Tywina pociemniała tak bardzo, że przez pół uderzenia serca Tyrion zastanawiał się, czy jego ojciec również nie wypił zatrutego wina. Tywin walnął pięścią w stół, tak rozgniewany, że nie był w stanie mówić.

Chciałbym zwrócić uwagę na to jak Tywin uderza pięścią w stół, co stanowi odpowiednik pięści Gregora, która przedstawia meteor-Światłonoścę lądujący w chwili gdy ciemnieje słońce. Również Areo Hotah często zamiast użyć słów, uderza o ziemię drzewcem swojej halabardy. Czyni tak na przykład dając sygnał do ataku, który zakończył się śmiercią księżycowego bohatera, Arysa Oakhearta. Poza tym, że wygląda na otrutego, Tywin nie jest w stanie przemówić, co przywodzi na myśl wszystkie motywy związane z udławieniem, poderżnięciem gardła i przecięciem Szyi (Przesmyku) Westeros, które przewijały się podczas walki na śmierć i życie pomiędzy Górą i Żmiją. Trucizna użyta do zamordowania Joffreya nazywa się Dusicielem, co kontynuuje tę linię symboliki.

Wystarczy już tego gadania o Tywinie, skupmy się na Sansie i Joffreyu – i na weselu, które w gruncie rzeczy było pogrzebem. Z technicznego punktu widzenia, księżycowa dziewica Sansa nie ginie razem z solarnym królem na ‘purpurowych godach’, ale w dość spektakularny sposób znika. Niektóre plotki na temat jej ucieczki pasują do archetypu księżycowej dziewicy: powiadają, że Sansa ”zamieniła się w wilka, który miał wielkie nietoperze skrzydła, i wyfrunęła przez okno wieży”. Przemiana i nietoperze skrzydła przypominają sen Dany o ‘obudzeniu smoka’ – i oczywiście, wyskoczenie z okna wieży do ważna część archetypu księżycowej dziewicy.

Duch z Wysokiego Serca widzi Sansę w wizji – jako Meduzę, dziewczynę z wężami we włosach. Poniższy fragment rówież pochodzi z Nawałnicy mieczy:

– Śniła mi się dziewczyna na uczcie. We włosach miała fioletowe węże, z których kłów skapywał jad.

Jadowite węże z tego snu reprezentują kryształy czarnego ametystu z Asshai umieszczone w siateczce Sansy, kamienie które kryją w sobie ‘Dusiciela’. Jadowite węże mogą przybywać ze słońca, tak jak to ma miejsce przy zatrutej włóczni Oberyna, ale mogą również pochodzić z księżyca, ponieważ trujące czarne meteory-Światłonoścy są (powiedzcie to razem ze mną) dziećmi słońca i księżyca. Są uwalaniane w chwili śmierci słońca i przynoszą ciemność na solarną twarz Joffreya (ależ to smutne).

Ametysty przywodzą na myśl Ametystową Cesarzową, zamordowaną przez Krwawnikowego Cesarza, jej brata – symbol drugiego księżyca. Przypominają się również fioletowe oczy Targaryenów (Euron i Victarion kilkukrotnie nazywają oczy Dany ametystowymi). Targaryenowie to ludzie-smoki, a Dany oczywiście też jest symbolem drugiego ksieżyca. Widzimy zatem, że symbolika ma tu wiele poziomów – i że różne symbole współdziałają ze sobą, potwierdzając się. Ale zaraz zaraz, to wszystko sięga głębiej.

Tak jak tarcza Gregora – która najpierw pokazuje jedną gwiazdę, po czym przemienia się w trzy czarne psy – opowiada historię o przemianie, siateczki Sansy zachowują się identycznie. Pierwsza jest wykonana z ‘kamieni księżycowych’, które są niebieskawo-białe (i w pewnym sensie, ‘żywe w świetle’), w tę ostatnią, zgubną siateczkę wprawione zostały czarne ametysty, symbolizujące to czym stał się jasny księżyc po swojej transformacji. Gregor pokazuje nam to samo – gdy jest żywy, nieustannie ma w swych żyłach makowe mleko, ale po zatruciu słoneczną włócznią, ma jedynie czarną krew.

Była to siatka na włosy wykonana ze srebrnych nici, tak cienkich i delikatnych, że gdy Sansa ujęła ją w palce, wydawało się jej, iż ozdoba waży nie więcej niż tchnienie. Tam, gdzie pasemka krzyżowały się ze sobą, wprawiono w nie małe klejnoty, tak ciemne, że zdawały się spijać blask księżyca.
– Co to za kamienie?
– Czarne ametysty z Asshai. Najrzadszy rodzaj. Za dnia mają barwę najgłębszego fioletu.

Wzmianka o tym, że czarne ametysty podobno ‘spijają blask księżyca’ to oczywista wskazówka sugerująca, że te trujące czarne kamienie, będące niczym fioletowe węże, reprezentują pijące światło krwawniki-meteory (ukłon w stronę Evolett z bloga Blue Winter Roses za to odkrycie). Oczywiście, również śliski czarny kamień z Asshai pije światło, podobnie jak miecz Neda, po przekuciu. Fragment o tym, że nocą ametysty wydają się czarne, zaś w świetle słońca mają barwę najgłębszego fioletu doskonale pasuje do oczu Ciemnej Gwiazdy, ser Gerolda Dayne’a, który także reprezentuje słońce i jasny księżyc rodzące mroczne trujące gwiazdy.

Przy okazji wspomnę, że srebro to kolor najczęściej kojarzony z księżycem, razem z bielą. Światło istniejącego nadal księżyca zazwyczaj sprawia, że wszystko wydaje się srebrne, uważam zatem, iż zniszczony drugi księżyc również był związany ze srebrem, przed swoją przemianą. Pomyślcie o Dany jeżdżącej na swojej klaczy, albo o tym jak bywała nazywana ‘srebrną panią’ przed transformacją na pogrzebowym stosie i obudzeniu smoków. Mokre włosy Dany są opisywane jako ‘stopione srebro’ – to kolejne powiązanie pomiędzy Sansą i Daenerys. Włosy Sansy są ‘pocałowane przez ogień’ i pokryte srebrem, co dobrze odpowiada stopionemu srebru i złotym włosom, podobnie jak wyobrażeniu, że Dany jest ‘wcielonym ogniem’, tak jak jej smoki.

Porównując księżycową matkę smoków Dany i Sansę, z której głowy wychodzą jadowite węże, możemy dostrzec, że czarne ametysty z Asshai są stawiane na równi ze smokami, ponieważ i one pochodzą z ksieżyca. W moim niedawnym odcinku we współpracy z History of Westeros rozmawialiśmy o wszystkich sprawach związanych z Asshai. Ustaliliśmy, że to, iż smoki przybyły z Asshai – tak jak czarne ametysty – wydaje się możliwe, a nawet całkiem prawdopodobne. Jako, że zarówno smoki, jak i czarne ametysty reprezentują Światłonoścę, możliwe, że mamy tu kolejną wskazówkę co do tego, że Azor Ahai rzeczywiście pochodził z Asshai. Jeśli fioletowoocy Valyrianie pochodzą od (przypuszczalnie) fioletowookiej Ametystowej Cesarzowej, może okazać się, że tak naprawdę przybyli z Asshai, ponieważ moim zdaniem miasto to było częścią  Wielkiego Cesarstwa Świtu.

W prologu Starcia królów maester Cressen opowiada nam o Dusicielu:

Cressen nie pamietał już jaką nazwę nadali liściowi Asshai’i, ani jak lyseńscy truciciele zwali kryształ. W Cytadeli nazywano go po prostu dusicielem. Jeśli rozpuszczono go w wodzie, sprawiał, że mięśnie ludzkiego gardła zaciskały się mocniej niż pięść, zamykająć światło tchawicy. Twarz ofiary podobno robiła się fioletowa jak kryształki, które stały się przyczyną jej śmierci, lecz tak samo przecież wyglądało oblicze człowieka, który zadławił się przy jedzeniu.

Innymi słowy, te pijące światło czarne klejnoty sprawiają, że różne rzeczy stają się ciemne, a podobieństwa pomiędzy ciemniejącymi twarzami lub oczami a ciemnymi fioletowymi ametystami są celowe. To również kolejna paralela dla grotu włóczni Oberyna, ostrza w kształcie liścia – trucizna zamaskowana jako czarne ametysty powstaje z liści. Nazywanie jej ‘nasionem¹’ również jest ciekawe, ponieważ komety bywają nazywane ‘nasieniem gwiazd’. Także Światłonośca może byś uznany za ogniste smocze nasienie słońca. Mamy tu zatem doskonałe współdziałanie symboli.


Cressen (ang. crescent – półksiężyc) myśli: They said a man’s face turned as purple as the little crystal seed from which his death was grown, but so too did a man choking on a morsel of food. – Powiadano, że twarz człowieka stawała się tak fioletowa jak małe kryształowe nasiono, z którego wyrosła jego śmierć… ale tak samo wyglądało oblicze człowieka, który zadławił się przełykając kęs.


Na dodatek w prologu Cressena pojawia się bardzo interesujące nawiązanie do zaćmienia, w momencie gdy maester chowa kryształki do kieszni swojej szaty. Żałuje, że nie posiada jednego z tych ‘pustych w środku pierścieni’ (hollow rings), których zwykli używać lyseńscy truciciele. ‘Pusty w środku pierścień’ to doskonały opis zaćmienia. W rzeczy samej, zaćmienie jest nazywane ‘pierścionkiem z diamentem’ jeśli zachodzi podczas niego pewien efekt optyczny, sprawiający, że wydaje się, że w jednym miejscu solarnej obrączki znajduje się lśniący klejnot. Taką sytuację przedstawia poniższa fotografia:

autor: Greg Wood/AFP/Getty Images

Innym efektem optycznym związanym z zaćmieniem słonecznym jest ‘pierścień ognia’, który możecie obejrzeć na tym zdjęciu (zwróćcie również uwagę na czerwone niebo):

C521C0013H_2012資料照片_N71_copy1

Oto nasz pusty w środku pierścień – to z niego przybywa trucizna czarnych ametystów.

Tak jak księżyc może stać się ‘czarną dziurą na niebie’, po tym jak staje się ‘ciemną gwiazdą’, siateczka na włosy również może nią być, jak dowiadujemy się z rozdziału Sansy w Nawałnicy mieczy:

Gdy wreszcie ją ściągnęła, długie kasztanowe włosy opadły jej kaskadą na ramiona i plecy. Siatka ze srebrnych nici zwisła z jej palców. Metal lśnił delikatnym blaskiem, a kamienie w świetle księżyca wydawały się zupełnie czarne. Czarne ametysty z Asshai. Jednego brakowało. Uniosła siatkę, by lepiej się jej przyjrzeć. W srebrnej oprawce, z której wypadł kamień, została po nim ciemna, rozmazana plama.

Ciemna smuga w srebrnej oprawce (ang. socket, również: oczodół) –  to nasza czarna dziura-księżyc. Gdy Sansa zrywa srebro zakrywające jej ‘pocałowane przez ogień’ kasztanowe włosy, ‘opadają one kaskadą’, niczym rzeka ognia. Jak przed chwilą wspomniałem, wygląda na to, że smoczy księżyc, który został zniszczony, był wcześniej związany ze srebrem – przed spaleniem i zerwaniem z nieba. A teraz, spójrzcie na kolejny akapit:

Zawładnęła nią nagła zgroza. Serce waliło jej jak młotem. Wstrzymała na chwilę oddech. Dlaczego tak się boję, to tylko ametyst, czarny ametyst z Asshai, nic więcej. Na pewno się poluzował i wypadł, a teraz leży gdzieś w sali tronowej albo na dziedzińcu, chyba że…

O nie, Sansa ma problem z sercem. Chwilę wcześniej zastanawiała się nad tym, czy to możliwe, że Joffrey w końcu umarł:

Czemu płakała, kiedy chciało jej się tańczyć? Czy to były łzy radości?

Agnonia i ekstaza, jak u Nissy Nissy. A serce Sansy bije jak młotem. Oczywiście, meteory są nazywane ‘sercami upadłych gwiazd’ na kartach Pieśni, więc spadający księżycowy meteor to dokładnie to, czym był Młot Wód, przynajmniej według naszej teorii. A zatem, serce Sansy bijące jak młotem to po prostu kolejne potwierdzenie tego, że Młot tak naprawdę był sercem upadłej księżycowej gwiazdy.

Serce bije jak młotem w chwili, gdy Sansa uświadamia sobie, że czarny ametyst, symbol czarnych księżycowych meteorów, wypadł. Możliwe, że stało się to w sali tronowej w Królewskiej Przystani, tam gdzie smoczy król zasiada na Żelaznym Tronie. Jak wspominałem, nazwa Królewska Przystań (King’s Landing, dosłownie ‘królewskie lądowanie’) odnosi się do lądowania Azora Ahai odrodzonego na nowo, czarnego meteoru. Ten motyw przejawia się w lądowaniu postaci opartych na archetypie Azora Ahai w Przystani – Aegona Zdobywcy i Stannisa Baratheona.

W sercu Królewskiej Przystani znajduje się Czerwona Twierdza, a w niej odnajdujemy same symbole smoczych meteorów, więc kryształ czarnego ametystu pasuje doskonale. Najpierw mamy Żelazny Tron, ‘potężną czarną bestię’ z powyrkęcanych mieczy spalonych na czarno w czarnym ogniu Baleriona. Smoczy tron z czarnych mieczy w sali z czerwonego kamienia przypomina mi czarny smoczy meteor otoczony czerwonym ogniem. Taki symbol odnajdujemy na herbach: rodu Blackfyre’ów (czarny smok na czerwieni), rodu Peake’ów (trzy czarne zamki na pomarańczu), rodu Clegane’ów (trzy czarne psy na żółtym polu) oraz na osobitym herbie Bittersteela (czerwony ogier z czarnymi skrzydłami na złotym polu), a także w związanym z Jonem Snow motywie czarnego lodu i czerwonego ognia. Niegdyś w sali tronowej stały czarne smocze czaszki – kolejne symbole smoczych meteorów. Pochód zamyka sam smoczy król, który zwykle nosił czarną zbroję i władał mieczem o nazwie Blackfyre (czarny ogień).

Innymi słowy, fragment o Sansie i Dontosie to doskonała wskazówka dotycząca Młotu Wód – serce księżycowej dziewicy bije jak młotem. Czje agonię i ekstazę w chwili, gdy kryształ czarnego ametystu spada na posadzkę w Czerwonej Twierdzy, miejscu gdzie niegdyś wylądował czarny smoczy król. A skoro mowa o smoczych czaszkach i ich zębach ‘jak czarne diamenty’, w kolejnym akapicie rozdziału Sansy pojawia się odniesienie do brakujących zębów:

Ser Dontos powiedział, że w tej siatce jest magia, która pozwoli jej wrócić do domu. Mówił, że musi ją włożyć na ucztę weselną Joffreya. Srebrny drut rozciągnął się mocno w kostkach jej dłoni. Pocierała kciukiem otwór po kamieniu. Próbowała się powstrzymać, lecz palce nie chciały jej słuchać. Coś przyciągało jej kciuk do oprawki, niczym język do dziury po zębie. Jaka magia? Król umarł, okrutny król, który przed tysiącem lat był jej rycerskim księciem.

Azor Ahai był rycerskim księciem przed tysiącem lat – a może dziesięcioma tysiącami – ale teraz jest martwym królem. Rozumiecie? Tak jak w przypadku czarnej słonecznej włóczni Oberyna, której trucizna została zagęszczona przy użyciu magii, pojawia się sugestia, że czarne ametysty są jednocześnie trujące i magiczne. Była mowa o tym, że czarne ametysty pozostawiają dziurę, która jest jak szpara po straconym zębie – a widzieliśmy, że smocze zęby to doskonałe symbole smoczych meterów. Z kolei opis porównujący smocze zęby do czarnych diamentów doskonale pasuje do pojawiającego się dość często motywu porównywania zwyłych diamentów do gwiazd. Na przykład, konstelacja Miecz Poranka ma w swojej rękojeści jasną białą gwiazdę, która ‘płonie niczym diament świtu’. Jednak smocze zęby reprezentują ciemne gwiazdy – są zatem czarnymi diamentami. Podobnie, czarne ametysty reprezentują ciemne gwiazdy i czarne dziury.

Zdanie o tym, że palce nie chciały słuchać Sansy bardzo dobrze współgra z innym fragmentem, który pojawia się akapit wcześniej:

Czuła się senna i odrętwiała. Moja skóra zamieniła się w porcelanę, w kość słoniową, w stal. Jej dłonie poruszały się sztywno i niezgrabnie, jakby nigdy dotąd nie rozpuszczała sobie włosów.

Dłonie Sansy zamieniające się w porcelanę i kość słoniową sprawiają, że myślimy o lśniących białych rzeczach, takich jak mleczne szkło i biały ksieżyc, podczas gdy palce ze stali przypominają nam stalowe palce Gregora i ksieżycowe meteory przedstawiane jako stalowe palce lub stal. Rozpuszczanie ognistych włosów znów przywodzi na myśl ogień przychodzący z księżyca – właśnie w takiej chwili powinny się pokazywać stalowe palce. Zwróćcie uwagę na porces jaki zostaje tu przedstawiony – Sansa zdejmuje srebrną siateczkę i wyzwala rzekę ognia. Na dodatek, na jej sukni znajdują się perły – perła to bez wątpienia lunarny symbol – ale w tej scenie perły są przykryte splamionym płaszczem Sandora, który Sansa przefarbowała na ciemną zieleń. Zakrywanie księżycowych pereł to dość oczywista symbolika – zaś płaszcz, który był biały, a następnie stał się ciemny opowiada taką samą opowieść. Jeśli chcemy mieć pewność, że mamy do czynienia z metaforyczną sceną, powinniśmy zawsze poszukać w niej wielu symboli, które mówią nam to samo, a ich wspólne pojawienie się ma sens. Właśnie tak się dzieje we wspomnianym rozdziale Sansy.

By zakończyć temat siateczki na włosy, musimy przyjrzeć się słowom Dontosa, w których mówi Sansie, że siateczka jest ‘zemstą za twojego ojca’. Oto ten fragment:

– Jest bardzo piękna – powiedziała Sansa, myśląc: Potrzebny mi statek, nie siatka na włosy.
– Piękniejsza niż ci się zdaje, słodkie dziecko. Rozumiesz, jest w niej magia. Trzymasz w dłoni sprawiedliwość. Zemstę za ojca. – Dontos pochylił się nad nią i znowu ją pocałował. – Powrót do domu.

Wcześniej przedstawiłem pomysł, że lunarną zemstą są dym i popiół powstałe w wyniku eksplozji księżyca oraz wznoszące się słupy dymu i popiołu wzbite przez uderzające w ziemię księżycowe meteory. Innymi słowy, czarne ametysty reprezentują dymiące czarne meteory, które zostawiają za sobą smugi popiołu – i zabijają słońce, tak jak cios dymiącej pięści Gregora zabija Oberyna.

Wiecie co jeszcze zostało nazwane ‘zemstą za Neda’? Ależ oczywiście, czerwona kometa. Ze Starcia królów:

Catelyn podniosła wzrok ku bladoczerwonej linii komety, która przecinała ciemnoniebieski firmament niczym długie zadrapanie na twarzy boga.
– Greatjon powiedział Robbowi, że dawni bogowie rozwinęli czerwoną flagę na znak zemsty za Neda.

Czerwona kometa dzieli symbolikę czarnego lodu/czerwonego ognia księżycowych meteorów. Tak jak one, czerwona kometa jest dzieckiem słońca i księżyca – przypomnijcie sobie, że uznałem, iż Azorem Ahai odrodzonym jest właśnie czerwona kometa, podczas gdy księżycowe meteory są jego smokami obudzonymi z kamienia – ale ogólnie rzecz biorąc, tak naprawdę są częściami większej całości, o tej samej naturze – tak jak Dany i Drogon lub Jon i Duch. Zarówno księżycowe meteory, jak i czerwona kometa pokazują nam symbolikę ‘fal krwi i nocy’, a fale nocy i krwi to właśnie zemsta księżyca. Czarne ametysty przypominają czarne meteory, smoki Azora Ahai, zaś czerwona kometa to Azor Ahai odrodzony. Mamy tu zatem doskonale dobraną parę. Zarówno meteory, jak i kometa mogą być uznane za przyczynę Długiej Nocy, a tym samym zemstę księżyca wymierzoną w słońce.

Fale krwi i nocy odnajdujemy pomiędzy warstwami Wiernego Przysiędze i Wdowiego Płaczu, a miecze te niegdyś stanowiły jedno, ciemny jak dym oręż z Valyriańskiej stali, miecz Neda Starka zwany Lodem. Greatjon porównuje czerwoną kometę do zemsty za neda, ale Arya porównuje ją do Lodu, pokrytego własną krwią Neda. To spawia, że Wierny Przysiędze i Wdowi Płacz zostają włączone do kategorii ‘lunarna zemsta’. I rzeczywiście, wręczając Wiernego Przysiędze Brienne Jaime mówi: ‘będziesz broniła córek Neda Starka jego własną stalą’. Na dodatek Wierny Przysiędze i Wdowi Płacz piją światło słońca i pociemniają kolory, o czym rozmawialiśmy już wielokrotnie. Widzimy zatem, że pociemnianie słońca jest już częścią symboliki mieczy wykutych z Lodu Neda. A zatem, są one doskonałymi symbolami księżycowej zemsty wobec słońca.

W razie gdybyście jeszcze do tego nie doszli, sam Ned Stark jest symbolem księżyca. Jego miecz, ‘Czarny Lód’, doskonały symbol Światłonoścy, spija jego własną krew – tak jak Światłonośca, miecz powstały z trupa księżyca wypił krew Nissy Nissy. Ned został ścięty, dokładnie tak jak ser Gregor. Miecz Gregora zostaje mu odebrany przez postać reprezentującą słońce, zaś miecz Neda zabiera Tywin. Miecz Neda zostaje zwrócony przeciwko niemu, tak jak Oberyn użył miecz Gregora przeciwko niemu (oczywiście, nieskutecznie). Na dodatek w chwili ścięcia Ned jest chory i w gorączce, tak jak księżycowa dziewica.

Ned był również Ręką Króla (Namiestnikiem) i został przez niego odrąbany. Wcześniej mieszkał w zamku z szarego kamienia, w którego murach płynie ciepła woda, ‘niczym krew w żyłach’. Pamiętacie, że Winterfell zostało spalone, prawda? W chwili gdy Lato i Bran ujrzeli coś co mogło być wykluwającym się smokiem? Mury pękają, Winterfell zostaje nazwane skorupką (shell)… a ciepła woda wypływa na zewnątrz, pokazując nam powódź księżycowej krwi. Szary kamień odpowiada Gregorowi opisanemu jako szary kamienny olbrzym. W rzeczy samej, w jednym z pierwszych rozdziałów Gry o tron Ned wygląda z punktu widzenia Brana jak olbrzym:

Spojrzał w górę. Jego pan ojciec, owinięty w futra i skóry, patrzył na niego ze swojego ogromnego rumaka niczym olbrzym.

Nigdy nie spotkałem się z tym, by ktoś próbował wytłumaczyć o co chodzi w tym zdaniu, więc uznałem, że warto tu o nim wspomnieć. W gruncie rzeczy, Ned i Winterfell są symbolami księżyca, a zatem dwa wcielenia księżycowej zemsty Neda – czerwona kometa i czarne ametysty – zaczynają mieć sporo sensu. Ametysty to pijące światło jadowite księżycowe węże, będące częścią jego córki, podczas gdy czerwona kometa symbolizuje jego miecz. Oczywiście, księżycowe meteory mogą reprezentować miecz księżyca lub jego dzieci. Widzimy zatem, że lunarna zemsta nadchodzi pod postacią miecza i dzieci. Przypomnijcie sobie, że w trzecim odcinku widzieliśmy jak Sandor Clegane gra rolę Azora Ahai odrodzonego jako piekielny ogar, w scenie gdzie jednocześnie ochraniał i mścił księżycową dziewicę, Sansę.

Ogólnie rzecz biorąc, wszystkie te symbole i metafory mówią nam to samo – słońce zabija księżyc, ale później księżyc mści się zasłaniając słońce. Możliwe, że to sugestia, iż miecz Azora Ahai został zwrócony przeciwko niemu, być może przez syna, którym mógł być Ostatni Bohater.


Góry na wietrze

W porządku, już prawie dotarliśmy do końca! Przed nami już tylko ostatnia nić symboliki wpleciona w pojedynek Oberyna i Gregora. Czy pamiętacie jak rozmawialiśmy o Drogonie jako Czarnym Strachu odrodzonym i na pierwszy rzut oka niemożliwej to spełnienia przepowiedni Mirri, według której Drogo powróci do Dany jedynie jeśli porodzi żywe dziecko i zdarzy się mnóstwo innych nieprawdopodobnych rzeczy?

– Kiedy słońce wzejdzie na zachodzie i zajdzie na wschodzie – odpowiedziała Mirri Maz Duur. – Kiedy wyschną morza, a wiatr będzie przenosił góry jak liście. Kiedy twoje łono znowu się poruszy i urodzisz żywe dziecko. Dopiero wtedy on powróci, nie wcześniej.

Stwierdziliśmy wówczas, że Drogo narodzony na nowo i Dany wydająca na świat dziecko reprezentują Azora Ahai, lecący księżycowy meteor. Ma się to stać gdy wiatr będzie przenosił góry jak liście. Ustaliliśmy, że Gregor – ‘Góra, Która Jeździ’ – pokazuje nam Azora Ahai jako pędzący meteor, lecz czy meteory ‘są przenoszone przez wiatr jak liście’? Przypomijcie sobie pokrytą czarnym olejem słoneczną włócznię Oberyna, która może symbolizować także ksieżycowy meteor – i to, że ma ona ostrze w kształcie liścia. Ostrze, którego Mirri używa do złożenia w ofierze czerwonego ogiera Droga i obmycia khala jego krwią, jest podobne. Oto jego opis:

Był stary, wykuty z rudego brązu, w kształcie liścia, z ostrzem pokrytym starymi znakami. Maegi przebiła szyję konia, który zadrżał przeraźliwie i wstrząsnał się, kiedy chlusnął z niego strumień krwi.

Rudy/czerwony brąz na podobieństwo czerwonego słońca, wykuty – w oryginale hammered – jak Młot Wód (The Hammer of the Waters) i w kształcie liścia, niczym góry rozwiewane przez wiatr. Pamiętajcie o tym, że i słońce i księżyc umierają, gdy Światłonośca zostaje wykuty, gdy słońce wędruje zbyt blisko księżyca, który pęka. Fala czarnej krwi, która wylewa się spod hełmu Gregora w wizji Brana, była zwyczajną krwią, dopóki nie przemieniła jej słoneczna włócznia Oberyna w kształcie liścia. Fala czerwonej krwi ogiera Droga zostaje wywołana przez nóż Mirri w kształcie liścia. A zatem, czerwony ogier Droga reprezentuje czerwoną kometę, krwawiącą gwiazdę – oczywiście, to właśnie ona wywołuje falę płonącej księżycowej krwi, dokładnie tak jak koń Droga daje nam krwawą falę. Innymi słowy, liście rozwiewane prez wiatr i ostrza w kształcie liści mogą reprezentować Światłonoścę – a Światłonośca może być również postrzegany jako spadająca góra. Jednak nie opierałbym całego wniosku na pojedynczym niejasnym fragmencie, och nie…

W tym poniżej, opowiadającym o zamieszkach w Królewskiej Przystani, pojawiają się ser Balon Swann, Sansa, Ogar, Tyrion, Joffrey i cała reszta.

Tyrion widział, jak ściągają z siodła ser Arona Santagara, wydzierając mu z dłoni chorągiew z czarnym jeleniu na złotym polu, herbem Baratheonów. Ser Balon Swann wypuścił z dłoni lwa Lannisterów, żeby wydobyć miecz. Ciał nim w prawo i lewo, gdy upadłą chorągiew rozszarpywano na tysiące strzępów, które rozsypywały się na wszystkie strony niczym niesione burzą karmazynowe liście. Po chwili zniknęły. Ktoś wpadł pod konia Joffreya i krzyknął głośno, gdy król go stratował. Tyrion nie widział, czy to mężczyzna, kobieta czy dziecko.

Kawałki słońca (‘lew Lannisterów’ to symbol solarny) rozwiewane przez burzowy wiatr, niczym czerwone liście – coś podobnego! Pamiętajcie o tym, że spadająće księżycowe meteory-góry są dziećmi słońca i księżyca, a zatem albo upadłe słońce, albo upadły księżyc może dawać nam rzeczy symbolizujące meteory. W mgnieniu oka, słońce znika – i dokładnie w tej chwili ktoś wpada pod konia Joffreya. Mamy tu zatem osobę stojącą przed słońcem, tworząc zaćmienie, dokładnie w momencie gdy słoneczna chorągiew wydaje na świat nawałnicę ognistych liści. A co nasz solarny król robi z tym niedoszłym zasłaniaczem słońc? Ależ oczywiście, tratuje. Krzyk ofiary stanowi paralelę jęku udręki i ekstazy Nissy Nissy.

Zwróćcie również uwagę na to, że gdy ser Balon upuszcza słoneczną chorągiew, dobywa miecza – co ma sens, ponieważ ten tysiąc ognistych liści to oczywiście płomienne ksiżycowe meteory, które są niczym miecze, być może nawet stały się mieczami. Miecze, ostrza w kształcie liści – rozumiecie.

Przedstawiam Wam wszystkim Azora Ahai odrodzonego, płonący liść.

Wreszcie, nie możemy rozmawiać o płonących i czerwonych liściach nie wspominając o czerwonych liściach czardrzew. Słyną z tego, że wyglądają jak zakrwawione dłonie. Jednak czasami są opisywane jako płomienie, na przykład w tym rozdziale Theona ze Stracia królów:

Czerwone liście czardrzewa jarzyły się niczym ogień pośród zieleni.

Jak wiemy, przedmioty umieszczone na gałęziach mitologicznych drzew-światów takich jak Yggdrasil, od którego czardrzewa ‘pochodzą’, że się tak wyrażę, reprezentują niebiosa. A zatem, czardrzewa posiadające czerwone liście, które przypominają zakrwawione dłonie lub płomienie, pokazują nam znajomy obraz ‘ognia i krwi’ związany z meteorami spadającymi z nieba. To świetny odpowiednik podartej lwiej chorągwi z poprzedniej sceny, która stała się burzą czerwonych liści – a motyw meteorów jako zakrwawionych dłoni prowadzi nas z powrotem do kamiennej pięści i symboli ognistej ręki.

Widzicie jak wszystkie te symbole wspólpracują, potwierdzając i wzmacniając się nawzajem? To zasupłany węzeł symboliki zawsze wzbudzający mój podziw, który sprawia, że mogę wydać z siebie jedynie ‘ach’ i ‘och’. Pokryta czarnym olejem włócznia Oberyna – grot w kształcie liścia na drzewcu z jesionowego drewna – jest powiązana z kilkoma innymi motywami: czarnym oleistym kamieniem, liścami jako meteorami, a przez to czardrzewami. Tymczasem jesionowa włócznia przywodzi na myśl inne jesionowe włócznie, na które nabito głowy braci Nocnej Straży, co doprowadza nas do czarnej i krwawej fali. Czerwone liście czardrzew, które są jak płonące zakrwawione dłonie łączą się z ostrzami w kształcie liści, wyzwalającymi falę krwi, symbolami ognistej ręki i pięści oraz motywem ognia i krwi na niebiosach. Góry rozwiewane przez wiatr niczym liście jednoczą kilka z tych motywów, podczas gdy Gregor ‘Góra’ ma kamienne pięści i fale czarnej krwi i nocy płynące w żyłach… i tak dalej i tak dalej. Spędzam sporo czasu usiłując wpaść na to jak przedstawiać takie rzeczy w pewnego rodzaju logicznej kolejności – co może być poważnym wyzwaniem. Lecz teraz, gdy dotarliśmy razem tak daleko, mamy wszystkie te motywy i symbole w głowach – możemy zatem dojrzeć do jak najważniejsze motywy i pomysły są wzmacniane z wielu stron. Widzimy również, że sposób w jaki George używa symboliki jest bez wątpienia celowy i spójny. Gdyby taki nie był, nigdy nie zdołalibyśmy sformułować jakichkolwiek hipotez i wstępnych wniosków, tak jak to robimy w tym podcaście.

Jako specjalny bonus na temat liści czardrzew, podrzucę Wam tę wisienkę na torcie z rozdziału Aryi w Starciu królów. Poniższy fragment pojawia się tuż po tym jak zeszła z gałęzi czardrzewa w Harrenhal:

Księżycowy blask nadawał gałęziom czardrzewa śnieżnobiałą barwę, lecz czerwone liście w kształcie pięcioramiennej gwiazdy robił się nocą czarne.

Podczas długiej nocy wszystkie księżycowe meteory były czarne. Na początku było trochę płomieni, ale po tym jak uderzyły w ziemię i wywołały ciemność, były czarne.

Ostatnim razem wspomniałem, że istnieje całkiem sporo ciekawych powiązań pomiędzy zielonowidzami/zmiennoskórymi/starymi bogami a Azorem Ahai i magią ognia – wygląda na to, że jednym z nich jest motyw płonących liści reprezentujących ksieżycowe meteory. Widzimy Berica i Bloodravena zasiadających na pewnego rodzaju tronach z korzeni czardrzew. Jest też (wkrótce wskrzeszony) zmiennoskóry Jon Snow, który również jest postacią reprezentującą odrodznego Azora Ahai, dokładnie tak jak Beric… przypomina się również ta zadziwiająca scena z Tańca ze smokami, w której Melisandre przywołuje Ducha do siebie, przełamując więź pomiędzy zmiennoskórym i jego zwierzęciem, a przynajmniej tak się wydaje. Na dodatek Mel zachęca Jona do rozwijania swoich zdolności, co jest tym dziwniejsze, że zazwyczaj nie ma nic przeciwko paleniu czardrzew.

Kończąc – i zapowiadając nadchodzący odcinek, w którym rozwinę te powiązania – wspomnę, że grom Boga Sztormów, który znamy już jako księżycowy meteor, jest znany z tego, że sprawił, iż DRZEWO STANĘŁO W PŁOMIENIACH. A czymże jest czardrzewo, jeśli nie krzyczącym drzewem o płonących dłoniach?


You can read the original text here.

 

 

 

Góra kontra Żmija i Młot Wód: Góry na wietrze

LML przedstawia Mityczną Astronomię Lodu i Ognia

Góra kontra Żmija i Młot Wód: Góry na wietrze

(The Mountain vs. the Viper and the Hammer of the Waters), w przekładzie Bluetigera


W porządku, już prawie dotarliśmy do końca! Przed nami już tylko ostatnia nić symboliki wpleciona w pojedynek Oberyna i Gregora. Czy pamiętacie jak rozmawialiśmy o Drogonie jako Czarnym Strachu odrodzonym i na pierwszy rzut oka niemożliwej to spełnienia przepowiedni Mirri, według której Drogo powróci do Dany jedynie jeśli porodzi żywe dziecko i zdarzy się mnóstwo innych nieprawdopodobnych rzeczy?

– Kiedy słońce wzejdzie na zachodzie i zajdzie na wschodzie – odpowiedziała Mirri Maz Duur. – Kiedy wyschną morza, a wiatr będzie przenosił góry jak liście. Kiedy twoje łono znowu się poruszy i urodzisz żywe dziecko. Dopiero wtedy on powróci, nie wcześniej.

Stwierdziliśmy wówczas, że Drogo narodzony na nowo i Dany wydająca na świat dziecko reprezentują Azora Ahai, lecący księżycowy meteor. Ma się to stać gdy wiatr będzie przenosił góry jak liście. Ustaliliśmy, że Gregor – ‘Góra, Która Jeździ’ – pokazuje nam Azora Ahai jako pędzący meteor, lecz czy meteory ‘są przenoszone przez wiatr jak liście’? Przypomijcie sobie pokrytą czarnym olejem słoneczną włócznię Oberyna, która może symbolizować także ksieżycowy meteor – i to, że ma ona ostrze w kształcie liścia. Ostrze, którego Mirri używa do złożenia w ofierze czerwonego ogiera Droga i obmycia khala jego krwią, jest podobne. Oto jego opis:

Był stary, wykuty z rudego brązu, w kształcie liścia, z ostrzem pokrytym starymi znakami. Maegi przebiła szyję konia, który zadrżał przeraźliwie i wstrząsnał się, kiedy chlusnął z niego strumień krwi.

Rudy/czerwony brąz na podobieństwo czerwonego słońca, wykuty – w oryginale hammered – jak Młot Wód (The Hammer of the Waters) i w kształcie liścia, niczym góry rozwiewane przez wiatr. Pamiętajcie o tym, że i słońce i księżyc umierają, gdy Światłonośca zostaje wykuty, gdy słońce wędruje zbyt blisko księżyca, który pęka. Fala czarnej krwi, która wylewa się spod hełmu Gregora w wizji Brana, była zwyczajną krwią, dopóki nie przemieniła jej słoneczna włócznia Oberyna w kształcie liścia. Fala czerwonej krwi ogiera Droga zostaje wywołana przez nóż Mirri w kształcie liścia. A zatem, czerwony ogier Droga reprezentuje czerwoną kometę, krwawiącą gwiazdę – oczywiście, to właśnie ona wywołuje falę płonącej księżycowej krwi, dokładnie tak jak koń Droga daje nam krwawą falę. Innymi słowy, liście rozwiewane prez wiatr i ostrza w kształcie liści mogą reprezentować Światłonoścę – a Światłonośca może być również postrzegany jako spadająca góra. Jednak nie opierałbym całego wniosku na pojedynczym niejasnym fragmencie, och nie…

W tym poniżej, opowiadającym o zamieszkach w Królewskiej Przystani, pojawiają się ser Balon Swann, Sansa, Ogar, Tyrion, Joffrey i cała reszta.

Tyrion widział, jak ściągają z siodła ser Arona Santagara, wydzierając mu z dłoni chorągiew z czarnym jeleniu na złotym polu, herbem Baratheonów. Ser Balon Swann wypuścił z dłoni lwa Lannisterów, żeby wydobyć miecz. Ciał nim w prawo i lewo, gdy upadłą chorągiew rozszarpywano na tysiące strzępów, które rozsypywały się na wszystkie strony niczym niesione burzą karmazynowe liście. Po chwili zniknęły. Ktoś wpadł pod konia Joffreya i krzyknął głośno, gdy król go stratował. Tyrion nie widział, czy to mężczyzna, kobieta czy dziecko.

Kawałki słońca (‘lew Lannisterów’ to symbol solarny) rozwiewane przez burzowy wiatr, niczym czerwone liście – coś podobnego! Pamiętajcie o tym, że spadająće księżycowe meteory-góry są dziećmi słońca i księżyca, a zatem albo upadłe słońce, albo upadły księżyc może dawać nam rzeczy symbolizujące meteory. W mgnieniu oka, słońce znika – i dokładnie w tej chwili ktoś wpada pod konia Joffreya. Mamy tu zatem osobę stojącą przed słońcem, tworząc zaćmienie, dokładnie w momencie gdy słoneczna chorągiew wydaje na świat nawałnicę ognistych liści. A co nasz solarny król robi z tym niedoszłym zasłaniaczem słońc? Ależ oczywiście, tratuje. Krzyk ofiary stanowi paralelę jęku udręki i ekstazy Nissy Nissy.

Zwróćcie również uwagę na to, że gdy ser Balon upuszcza słoneczną chorągiew, dobywa miecza – co ma sens, ponieważ ten tysiąc ognistych liści to oczywiście płomienne ksiżycowe meteory, które są niczym miecze, być może nawet stały się mieczami. Miecze, ostrza w kształcie liści – rozumiecie.

Przedstawiam Wam wszystkim Azora Ahai odrodzonego, płonący liść.

Wreszcie, nie możemy rozmawiać o płonących i czerwonych liściach nie wspominając o czerwonych liściach czardrzew. Słyną z tego, że wyglądają jak zakrwawione dłonie. Jednak czasami są opisywane jako płomienie, na przykład w tym rozdziale Theona ze Stracia królów:

Czerwone liście czardrzewa jarzyły się niczym ogień pośród zieleni.

Jak wiemy, przedmioty umieszczone na gałęziach mitologicznych drzew-światów takich jak Yggdrasil, od którego czardrzewa ‘pochodzą’, że się tak wyrażę, reprezentują niebiosa. A zatem, czardrzewa posiadające czerwone liście, które przypominają zakrwawione dłonie lub płomienie, pokazują nam znajomy obraz ‘ognia i krwi’ związany z meteorami spadającymi z nieba. To świetny odpowiednik podartej lwiej chorągwi z poprzedniej sceny, która stała się burzą czerwonych liści – a motyw meteorów jako zakrwawionych dłoni prowadzi nas z powrotem do kamiennej pięści i symboli ognistej ręki.

Widzicie jak wszystkie te symbole wspólpracują, potwierdzając i wzmacniając się nawzajem? To zasupłany węzeł symboliki zawsze wzbudzający mój podziw, który sprawia, że mogę wydać z siebie jedynie ‘ach’ i ‘och’. Pokryta czarnym olejem włócznia Oberyna – grot w kształcie liścia na drzewcu z jesionowego drewna – jest powiązana z kilkoma innymi motywami: czarnym oleistym kamieniem, liścami jako meteorami, a przez to czardrzewami. Tymczasem jesionowa włócznia przywodzi na myśl inne jesionowe włócznie, na które nabito głowy braci Nocnej Straży, co doprowadza nas do czarnej i krwawej fali. Czerwone liście czardrzew, które są jak płonące zakrwawione dłonie łączą się z ostrzami w kształcie liści, wyzwalającymi falę krwi, symbolami ognistej ręki i pięści oraz motywem ognia i krwi na niebiosach. Góry rozwiewane przez wiatr niczym liście jednoczą kilka z tych motywów, podczas gdy Gregor ‘Góra’ ma kamienne pięści i fale czarnej krwi i nocy płynące w żyłach… i tak dalej i tak dalej. Spędzam sporo czasu usiłując wpaść na to jak przedstawiać takie rzeczy w pewnego rodzaju logicznej kolejności – co może być poważnym wyzwaniem. Lecz teraz, gdy dotarliśmy razem tak daleko, mamy wszystkie te motywy i symbole w głowach – możemy zatem dojrzeć do jak najważniejsze motywy i pomysły są wzmacniane z wielu stron. Widzimy również, że sposób w jaki George używa symboliki jest bez wątpienia celowy i spójny. Gdyby taki nie był, nigdy nie zdołalibyśmy sformułować jakichkolwiek hipotez i wstępnych wniosków, tak jak to robimy w tym podcaście.

Jako specjalny bonus na temat liści czardrzew, podrzucę Wam tę wisienkę na torcie z rozdziału Aryi w Starciu królów. Poniższy fragment pojawia się tuż po tym jak zeszła z gałęzi czardrzewa w Harrenhal:

Księżycowy blask nadawał gałęziom czardrzewa śnieżnobiałą barwę, lecz czerwone liście w kształcie pięcioramiennej gwiazdy robił się nocą czarne.

Podczas długiej nocy wszystkie księżycowe meteory były czarne. Na początku było trochę płomieni, ale po tym jak uderzyły w ziemię i wywołały ciemność, były czarne.

Ostatnim razem wspomniałem, że istnieje całkiem sporo ciekawych powiązań pomiędzy zielonowidzami/zmiennoskórymi/starymi bogami a Azorem Ahai i magią ognia – wygląda na to, że jednym z nich jest motyw płonących liści reprezentujących ksieżycowe meteory. Widzimy Berica i Bloodravena zasiadających na pewnego rodzaju tronach z korzeni czardrzew. Jest też (wkrótce wskrzeszony) zmiennoskóry Jon Snow, który również jest postacią reprezentującą odrodznego Azora Ahai, dokładnie tak jak Beric… przypomina się również ta zadziwiająca scena z Tańca ze smokami, w której Melisandre przywołuje Ducha do siebie, przełamując więź pomiędzy zmiennoskórym i jego zwierzęciem, a przynajmniej tak się wydaje. Na dodatek Mel zachęca Jona do rozwijania swoich zdolności, co jest tym dziwniejsze, że zazwyczaj nie ma nic przeciwko paleniu czardrzew.

Kończąc – i zapowiadając nadchodzący odcinek, w którym rozwinę te powiązania – wspomnę, że grom Boga Sztormów, który znamy już jako księżycowy meteor, jest znany z tego, że sprawił, iż DRZEWO STANĘŁO W PŁOMIENIACH. A czymże jest czardrzewo, jeśli nie krzyczącym drzewem o płonących dłoniach?


You can read the original text here.

Pozostałe odcinki tłumaczenia eseju The Mountain vs. the Viper and the Hammer of the Waters możecie znaleźć tutaj.

 

Góra kontra Żmija i Młot Wód: Wesele, Pogrzeb… i Zemsta

LML przedstawia Mityczną Astronomię Lodu i Ognia

Góra kontra Żmija i Młot Wód: Wesele, Pogrzeb… i Zemsta 

(The Mountain vs. the Viper and the Hammer of the Waters), w przekładzie Bluetigera


Zatem, w tym momencie każda rozsądna osoba zakończyłaby ten podcast. I jeśli chcecie, możecie udawać, że jestem rozsądną osobą i wyłączyć właśnie teraz! Jednakże, zawsze byłem miłośnikiem długich książek (choćby tych pięciu, których zapewne Wy również jesteście wielkimi fanami), długich piosenek, długich albumów… album Passion Play zespołu Jethro Tull w którym znajduje się tylko jedna piosenka doskonale odpowiada takiemu opisowi, podobnie jak ponad piętnastominutowe utwory Mars Volta, King Crimson, Tool, Pink Floyd i inne podobne kawałki, zawsze podobały mi się również długie podcasty, na przykład rewelacyjna Hardcore History Dana Carlina, a także długie zdania, na przykład to do którego końca właśnie się zbliżam. W takim razie, ponieważ nadal ‘mam na to ochotę’, przygotowałem dla Was jeszcze trochę mitycznej astronomii. Mogłem to wszystko wyciąć i zachować na inny esej – tak sugerował głos rozsądku – ale rzecz w tym, że akurat ten temat ma związek z próbą walki i symbolami, które przed chwilą omówiliśmy. A więc, dopóki macie to wszystko świeżo w pamięci, dysponujecie kontekstem potrzebnym do zrozumienia co tak naprawdę dzieje się z siateczką na włosy Sansy i o co chodzi w Purpurowych Godach. Jeśli chcecie, możecie zrobić pauzę i wrócić do tego podcastu później, udając że to kolejny odcinek. Przyadłby mi się dobry redaktor.

Teraz gdy zmusiłem mój głos rozsądku do zamilknięcia, porozmawiajmy o Purpurowych Godach i Sansie Stark, ksieżycowej dziewicy – Meduzie. Już wcześniej porozmawialiśmy co nieco o tym weselu, ponieważ miało ogromny wpływ na pojedynek Oberyna i Gregora – w końcu próba walki to bezpośrednia konsekwencja Purpurowych Godów. Na począktu walki pojawia się ciekawe zdanie, które odsyła nas prosto do wesela Joffreya, a dokładniej do siateczki Sansy. Tuż przed rozpoczęciem starcia pomiędzy Gregorem i Oberynem, Tyrion w następujący sposób obserwuje otoczenie:

Niektórzy przywlekli ze sobą krzesła, by usiąść na nich wygodnie, inni zaś siedzieli na beczkach. Trzeba było urządzić tę walkę w Smoczej Jamie – pomyślał skwaszony Tyrion. Moglibyśmy brać za wstęp po grosiku i zwróciłyby się nam koszty zarówno ślubu, jak i pogrzebu Joffreya.

Pieśni Lodu i Ognia miedziane grosze (copper pennies) są również nazywane gwiazdami, widzimy zatem motyw głów jako symboli gwiazd i ciał niebieskich. (W oryginale Tyrion chce ‘brać po grosiku za głowę’). Smocza Jama to świetny symbol zniszczonego księżyca – była domem smoków, który zotał zniszczony w wielkim pożarze i runął. Tak jak słońce miało dwie księżycowe boginie-żony, Aegon miał Rhaenys i Visenyę. I oczywiście, Smocza Jama stoi na Wzgórzu Rhaenys, która zmarła wcześnie, zabita gdy spadła ze smoka w Hellholcie. Smocza księżniczka spadająća z nieba razem ze swoim smokiem – to nasza symbolika spadającej księżycowej dziewicy. Jej smok Meraxes został trafiony w oko, co przywodzi na myśl legendę o Serwynie, który przebił oko smoka Urraxa włócznią. Jak już wspominałem, w przyszłości napiszę esej o tych dwóch księżycach. Wspominam o tym teraz, ponieważ ważne jest to, że Rhaenys była małżonką ‘ognistym księżycem’ Aegona, a cała jej symbolika pasuje do zniszczonego drugiego księżyca. Smocza Jama położona na Wzgórzu Rhaenys jest tego najlepszym przykładem – a zatem, wzmianka o zorganizowaniu próby walki w tym właśnie miejscu to po prostu inny sposób zasygnalizowania nam, co tak naprawdę pokazuje pojedynek Oberyna i Gregora – zniszczenie drugiego księżyca. Na dodatek, Góra zabił podobno księżniczkę Rhaenys, córkę Elii i Rhaegara, która otrzymała imię na cześć pierwszej Rhaenys, co daje nam kolejne powiązanie pomiędzy tymi postaciami i drugim księżycem.

W powyższym fragmencie ważne jest również to, że Joffrey, inny solarny król, ma wesele i pogrzeb które są ze sobą powiązane. Joff zmarł podczas swojego wesela, tak jak słońce zginęło podczas zbliżenia z drugim księżycem, i tak jak Oberyn i Gregor zabijają się nawzajem podczas pojedynku. Gdy Joffrey został otruty, jego solarna twarz pociemniała, a trucizna pochodziła od innej księżycowej dziewicy – Sansy. To przedstawienie fal nocy (chmury odłamków księżyca), które przesłoniły twarz słońca – zemsty księżyca, o której już mówiliśmy. Gdy Dontos wręcza Sansie siateczkę na włosy zawierającą truciznę i prosi, by założyła ją na ślub Joffreya, mówi jej ‘trzymasz zemstę‘.

Odzwierciedleniem pociemniałej z powodu trucizny twarzy Joffreya jest reakcja Tywina na początku rozdziału o pojedynku Oberyna i Gregora, po tym jak Tyrion ogłasza, że domaga się próby walki:

Twarz lorda Tywina pociemniała tak bardzo, że przez pół uderzenia serca Tyrion zastanawiał się, czy jego ojciec również nie wypił zatrutego wina. Tywin walnął pięścią w stół, tak rozgniewany, że nie był w stanie mówić.

Chciałbym zwrócić uwagę na to jak Tywin uderza pięścią w stół, co stanowi odpowiednik pięści Gregora, która przedstawia meteor-Światłonoścę lądujący w chwili gdy ciemnieje słońce. Również Areo Hotah często zamiast użyć słów, uderza o ziemię drzewcem swojej halabardy. Czyni tak na przykład dając sygnał do ataku, który zakończył się śmiercią księżycowego bohatera, Arysa Oakhearta. Poza tym, że wygląda na otrutego, Tywin nie jest w stanie przemówić, co przywodzi na myśl wszystkie motywy związane z udławieniem, poderżnięciem gardła i przecięciem Szyi (Przesmyku) Westeros, które przewijały się podczas walki na śmierć i życie pomiędzy Górą i Żmiją. Trucizna użyta do zamordowania Joffreya nazywa się Dusicielem, co kontynuuje tę linię symboliki.

Wystarczy już tego gadania o Tywinie, skupmy się na Sansie i Joffreyu – i na weselu, które w gruncie rzeczy było pogrzebem. Z technicznego punktu widzenia, księżycowa dziewica Sansa nie ginie razem z solarnym królem na ‘purpurowych godach’, ale w dość spektakularny sposób znika. Niektóre plotki na temat jej ucieczki pasują do archetypu księżycowej dziewicy: powiadają, że Sansa ”zamieniła się w wilka, który miał wielkie nietoperze skrzydła, i wyfrunęła przez okno wieży”. Przemiana i nietoperze skrzydła przypominają sen Dany o ‘obudzeniu smoka’ – i oczywiście, wyskoczenie z okna wieży do ważna część archetypu księżycowej dziewicy.

Duch z Wysokiego Serca widzi Sansę w wizji – jako Meduzę, dziewczynę z wężami we włosach. Poniższy fragment rówież pochodzi z Nawałnicy mieczy:

– Śniła mi się dziewczyna na uczcie. We włosach miała fioletowe węże, z których kłów skapywał jad.

Jadowite węże z tego snu reprezentują kryształy czarnego ametystu z Asshai umieszczone w siateczce Sansy, kamienie które kryją w sobie ‘Dusiciela’. Jadowite węże mogą przybywać ze słońca, tak jak to ma miejsce przy zatrutej włóczni Oberyna, ale mogą również pochodzić z księżyca, ponieważ trujące czarne meteory-Światłonoścy są (powiedzcie to razem ze mną) dziećmi słońca i księżyca. Są uwalaniane w chwili śmierci słońca i przynoszą ciemność na solarną twarz Joffreya (ależ to smutne).

Ametysty przywodzą na myśl Ametystową Cesarzową, zamordowaną przez Krwawnikowego Cesarza, jej brata – symbol drugiego księżyca. Przypominają się również fioletowe oczy Targaryenów (Euron i Victarion kilkukrotnie nazywają oczy Dany ametystowymi). Targaryenowie to ludzie-smoki, a Dany oczywiście też jest symbolem drugiego ksieżyca. Widzimy zatem, że symbolika ma tu wiele poziomów – i że różne symbole współdziałają ze sobą, potwierdzając się. Ale zaraz zaraz, to wszystko sięga głębiej.

Tak jak tarcza Gregora – która najpierw pokazuje jedną gwiazdę, po czym przemienia się w trzy czarne psy – opowiada historię o przemianie, siateczki Sansy zachowują się identycznie. Pierwsza jest wykonana z ‘kamieni księżycowych’, które są niebieskawo-białe (i w pewnym sensie, ‘żywe w świetle’), w tę ostatnią, zgubną siateczkę wprawione zostały czarne ametysty, symbolizujące to czym stał się jasny księżyc po swojej transformacji. Gregor pokazuje nam to samo – gdy jest żywy, nieustannie ma w swych żyłach makowe mleko, ale po zatruciu słoneczną włócznią, ma jedynie czarną krew.

Była to siatka na włosy wykonana ze srebrnych nici, tak cienkich i delikatnych, że gdy Sansa ujęła ją w palce, wydawało się jej, iż ozdoba waży nie więcej niż tchnienie. Tam, gdzie pasemka krzyżowały się ze sobą, wprawiono w nie małe klejnoty, tak ciemne, że zdawały się spijać blask księżyca.
– Co to za kamienie?
– Czarne ametysty z Asshai. Najrzadszy rodzaj. Za dnia mają barwę najgłębszego fioletu.

Wzmianka o tym, że czarne ametysty podobno ‘spijają blask księżyca’ to oczywista wskazówka sugerująca, że te trujące czarne kamienie, będące niczym fioletowe węże, reprezentują pijące światło krwawniki-meteory (ukłon w stronę Evolett z bloga Blue Winter Roses za to odkrycie). Oczywiście, również śliski czarny kamień z Asshai pije światło, podobnie jak miecz Neda, po przekuciu. Fragment o tym, że nocą ametysty wydają się czarne, zaś w świetle słońca mają barwę najgłębszego fioletu doskonale pasuje do oczu Ciemnej Gwiazdy, ser Gerolda Dayne’a, który także reprezentuje słońce i jasny księżyc rodzące mroczne trujące gwiazdy.

Przy okazji wspomnę, że srebro to kolor najczęściej kojarzony z księżycem, razem z bielą. Światło istniejącego nadal księżyca zazwyczaj sprawia, że wszystko wydaje się srebrne, uważam zatem, iż zniszczony drugi księżyc również był związany ze srebrem, przed swoją przemianą. Pomyślcie o Dany jeżdżącej na swojej klaczy, albo o tym jak bywała nazywana ‘srebrną panią’ przed transformacją na pogrzebowym stosie i obudzeniu smoków. Mokre włosy Dany są opisywane jako ‘stopione srebro’ – to kolejne powiązanie pomiędzy Sansą i Daenerys. Włosy Sansy są ‘pocałowane przez ogień’ i pokryte srebrem, co dobrze odpowiada stopionemu srebru i złotym włosom, podobnie jak wyobrażeniu, że Dany jest ‘wcielonym ogniem’, tak jak jej smoki.

Porównując księżycową matkę smoków Dany i Sansę, z której głowy wychodzą jadowite węże, możemy dostrzec, że czarne ametysty z Asshai są stawiane na równi ze smokami, ponieważ i one pochodzą z ksieżyca. W moim niedawnym odcinku we współpracy z History of Westeros rozmawialiśmy o wszystkich sprawach związanych z Asshai. Ustaliliśmy, że to, iż smoki przybyły z Asshai – tak jak czarne ametysty – wydaje się możliwe, a nawet całkiem prawdopodobne. Jako, że zarówno smoki, jak i czarne ametysty reprezentują Światłonoścę, możliwe, że mamy tu kolejną wskazówkę co do tego, że Azor Ahai rzeczywiście pochodził z Asshai. Jeśli fioletowoocy Valyrianie pochodzą od (przypuszczalnie) fioletowookiej Ametystowej Cesarzowej, może okazać się, że tak naprawdę przybyli z Asshai, ponieważ moim zdaniem miasto to było częścią  Wielkiego Cesarstwa Świtu.

W prologu Starcia królów maester Cressen opowiada nam o Dusicielu:

Cressen nie pamietał już jaką nazwę nadali liściowi Asshai’i, ani jak lyseńscy truciciele zwali kryształ. W Cytadeli nazywano go po prostu dusicielem. Jeśli rozpuszczono go w wodzie, sprawiał, że mięśnie ludzkiego gardła zaciskały się mocniej niż pięść, zamykająć światło tchawicy. Twarz ofiary podobno robiła się fioletowa jak kryształki, które stały się przyczyną jej śmierci, lecz tak samo przecież wyglądało oblicze człowieka, który zadławił się przy jedzeniu.

Innymi słowy, te pijące światło czarne klejnoty sprawiają, że różne rzeczy stają się ciemne, a podobieństwa pomiędzy ciemniejącymi twarzami lub oczami a ciemnymi fioletowymi ametystami są celowe. To również kolejna paralela dla grotu włóczni Oberyna, ostrza w kształcie liścia – trucizna zamaskowana jako czarne ametysty powstaje z liści. Nazywanie jej ‘nasionem¹’ również jest ciekawe, ponieważ komety bywają nazywane ‘nasieniem gwiazd’. Także Światłonośca może byś uznany za ogniste smocze nasienie słońca. Mamy tu zatem doskonałe współdziałanie symboli.


Cressen (ang. crescent – półksiężyc) myśli: They said a man’s face turned as purple as the little crystal seed from which his death was grown, but so too did a man choking on a morsel of food. – Powiadano, że twarz człowieka stawała się tak fioletowa jak małe kryształowe nasiono, z którego wyrosła jego śmierć… ale tak samo wyglądało oblicze człowieka, który zadławił się przełykając kęs.


Na dodatek w prologu Cressena pojawia się bardzo interesujące nawiązanie do zaćmienia, w momencie gdy maester chowa kryształki do kieszni swojej szaty. Żałuje, że nie posiada jednego z tych ‘pustych w środku pierścieni’ (hollow rings), których zwykli używać lyseńscy truciciele. ‘Pusty w środku pierścień’ to doskonały opis zaćmienia. W rzeczy samej, zaćmienie jest nazywane ‘pierścionkiem z diamentem’ jeśli zachodzi podczas niego pewien efekt optyczny, sprawiający, że wydaje się, że w jednym miejscu solarnej obrączki znajduje się lśniący klejnot. Taką sytuację przedstawia poniższa fotografia:

autor: Greg Wood/AFP/Getty Images

Innym efektem optycznym związanym z zaćmieniem słonecznym jest ‘pierścień ognia’, który możecie obejrzeć na tym zdjęciu (zwróćcie również uwagę na czerwone niebo):

C521C0013H_2012資料照片_N71_copy1

Oto nasz pusty w środku pierścień – to z niego przybywa trucizna czarnych ametystów.

Tak jak księżyc może stać się ‘czarną dziurą na niebie’, po tym jak staje się ‘ciemną gwiazdą’, siateczka na włosy również może nią być, jak dowiadujemy się z rozdziału Sansy w Nawałnicy mieczy:

Gdy wreszcie ją ściągnęła, długie kasztanowe włosy opadły jej kaskadą na ramiona i plecy. Siatka ze srebrnych nici zwisła z jej palców. Metal lśnił delikatnym blaskiem, a kamienie w świetle księżyca wydawały się zupełnie czarne. Czarne ametysty z Asshai. Jednego brakowało. Uniosła siatkę, by lepiej się jej przyjrzeć. W srebrnej oprawce, z której wypadł kamień, została po nim ciemna, rozmazana plama.

Ciemna smuga w srebrnej oprawce (ang. socket, również: oczodół) –  to nasza czarna dziura-księżyc. Gdy Sansa zrywa srebro zakrywające jej ‘pocałowane przez ogień’ kasztanowe włosy, ‘opadają one kaskadą’, niczym rzeka ognia. Jak przed chwilą wspomniałem, wygląda na to, że smoczy księżyc, który został zniszczony, był wcześniej związany ze srebrem – przed spaleniem i zerwaniem z nieba. A teraz, spójrzcie na kolejny akapit:

Zawładnęła nią nagła zgroza. Serce waliło jej jak młotem. Wstrzymała na chwilę oddech. Dlaczego tak się boję, to tylko ametyst, czarny ametyst z Asshai, nic więcej. Na pewno się poluzował i wypadł, a teraz leży gdzieś w sali tronowej albo na dziedzińcu, chyba że…

O nie, Sansa ma problem z sercem. Chwilę wcześniej zastanawiała się nad tym, czy to możliwe, że Joffrey w końcu umarł:

Czemu płakała, kiedy chciało jej się tańczyć? Czy to były łzy radości?

Agnonia i ekstaza, jak u Nissy Nissy. A serce Sansy bije jak młotem. Oczywiście, meteory są nazywane ‘sercami upadłych gwiazd’ na kartach Pieśni, więc spadający księżycowy meteor to dokładnie to, czym był Młot Wód, przynajmniej według naszej teorii. A zatem, serce Sansy bijące jak młotem to po prostu kolejne potwierdzenie tego, że Młot tak naprawdę był sercem upadłej księżycowej gwiazdy.

Serce bije jak młotem w chwili, gdy Sansa uświadamia sobie, że czarny ametyst, symbol czarnych księżycowych meteorów, wypadł. Możliwe, że stało się to w sali tronowej w Królewskiej Przystani, tam gdzie smoczy król zasiada na Żelaznym Tronie. Jak wspominałem, nazwa Królewska Przystań (King’s Landing, dosłownie ‘królewskie lądowanie’) odnosi się do lądowania Azora Ahai odrodzonego na nowo, czarnego meteoru. Ten motyw przejawia się w lądowaniu postaci opartych na archetypie Azora Ahai w Przystani – Aegona Zdobywcy i Stannisa Baratheona.

W sercu Królewskiej Przystani znajduje się Czerwona Twierdza, a w niej odnajdujemy same symbole smoczych meteorów, więc kryształ czarnego ametystu pasuje doskonale. Najpierw mamy Żelazny Tron, ‘potężną czarną bestię’ z powyrkęcanych mieczy spalonych na czarno w czarnym ogniu Baleriona. Smoczy tron z czarnych mieczy w sali z czerwonego kamienia przypomina mi czarny smoczy meteor otoczony czerwonym ogniem. Taki symbol odnajdujemy na herbach: rodu Blackfyre’ów (czarny smok na czerwieni), rodu Peake’ów (trzy czarne zamki na pomarańczu), rodu Clegane’ów (trzy czarne psy na żółtym polu) oraz na osobitym herbie Bittersteela (czerwony ogier z czarnymi skrzydłami na złotym polu), a także w związanym z Jonem Snow motywie czarnego lodu i czerwonego ognia. Niegdyś w sali tronowej stały czarne smocze czaszki – kolejne symbole smoczych meteorów. Pochód zamyka sam smoczy król, który zwykle nosił czarną zbroję i władał mieczem o nazwie Blackfyre (czarny ogień).

Innymi słowy, fragment o Sansie i Dontosie to doskonała wskazówka dotycząca Młotu Wód – serce księżycowej dziewicy bije jak młotem. Czje agonię i ekstazę w chwili, gdy kryształ czarnego ametystu spada na posadzkę w Czerwonej Twierdzy, miejscu gdzie niegdyś wylądował czarny smoczy król. A skoro mowa o smoczych czaszkach i ich zębach ‘jak czarne diamenty’, w kolejnym akapicie rozdziału Sansy pojawia się odniesienie do brakujących zębów:

Ser Dontos powiedział, że w tej siatce jest magia, która pozwoli jej wrócić do domu. Mówił, że musi ją włożyć na ucztę weselną Joffreya. Srebrny drut rozciągnął się mocno w kostkach jej dłoni. Pocierała kciukiem otwór po kamieniu. Próbowała się powstrzymać, lecz palce nie chciały jej słuchać. Coś przyciągało jej kciuk do oprawki, niczym język do dziury po zębie. Jaka magia? Król umarł, okrutny król, który przed tysiącem lat był jej rycerskim księciem.

Azor Ahai był rycerskim księciem przed tysiącem lat – a może dziesięcioma tysiącami – ale teraz jest martwym królem. Rozumiecie? Tak jak w przypadku czarnej słonecznej włóczni Oberyna, której trucizna została zagęszczona przy użyciu magii, pojawia się sugestia, że czarne ametysty są jednocześnie trujące i magiczne. Była mowa o tym, że czarne ametysty pozostawiają dziurę, która jest jak szpara po straconym zębie – a widzieliśmy, że smocze zęby to doskonałe symbole smoczych meterów. Z kolei opis porównujący smocze zęby do czarnych diamentów doskonale pasuje do pojawiającego się dość często motywu porównywania zwyłych diamentów do gwiazd. Na przykład, konstelacja Miecz Poranka ma w swojej rękojeści jasną białą gwiazdę, która ‘płonie niczym diament świtu’. Jednak smocze zęby reprezentują ciemne gwiazdy – są zatem czarnymi diamentami. Podobnie, czarne ametysty reprezentują ciemne gwiazdy i czarne dziury.

Zdanie o tym, że palce nie chciały słuchać Sansy bardzo dobrze współgra z innym fragmentem, który pojawia się akapit wcześniej:

Czuła się senna i odrętwiała. Moja skóra zamieniła się w porcelanę, w kość słoniową, w stal. Jej dłonie poruszały się sztywno i niezgrabnie, jakby nigdy dotąd nie rozpuszczała sobie włosów.

Dłonie Sansy zamieniające się w porcelanę i kość słoniową sprawiają, że myślimy o lśniących białych rzeczach, takich jak mleczne szkło i biały ksieżyc, podczas gdy palce ze stali przypominają nam stalowe palce Gregora i ksieżycowe meteory przedstawiane jako stalowe palce lub stal. Rozpuszczanie ognistych włosów znów przywodzi na myśl ogień przychodzący z księżyca – właśnie w takiej chwili powinny się pokazywać stalowe palce. Zwróćcie uwagę na porces jaki zostaje tu przedstawiony – Sansa zdejmuje srebrną siateczkę i wyzwala rzekę ognia. Na dodatek, na jej sukni znajdują się perły – perła to bez wątpienia lunarny symbol – ale w tej scenie perły są przykryte splamionym płaszczem Sandora, który Sansa przefarbowała na ciemną zieleń. Zakrywanie księżycowych pereł to dość oczywista symbolika – zaś płaszcz, który był biały, a następnie stał się ciemny opowiada taką samą opowieść. Jeśli chcemy mieć pewność, że mamy do czynienia z metaforyczną sceną, powinniśmy zawsze poszukać w niej wielu symboli, które mówią nam to samo, a ich wspólne pojawienie się ma sens. Właśnie tak się dzieje we wspomnianym rozdziale Sansy.

By zakończyć temat siateczki na włosy, musimy przyjrzeć się słowom Dontosa, w których mówi Sansie, że siateczka jest ‘zemstą za twojego ojca’. Oto ten fragment:

– Jest bardzo piękna – powiedziała Sansa, myśląc: Potrzebny mi statek, nie siatka na włosy.
– Piękniejsza niż ci się zdaje, słodkie dziecko. Rozumiesz, jest w niej magia. Trzymasz w dłoni sprawiedliwość. Zemstę za ojca. – Dontos pochylił się nad nią i znowu ją pocałował. – Powrót do domu.

Wcześniej przedstawiłem pomysł, że lunarną zemstą są dym i popiół powstałe w wyniku eksplozji księżyca oraz wznoszące się słupy dymu i popiołu wzbite przez uderzające w ziemię księżycowe meteory. Innymi słowy, czarne ametysty reprezentują dymiące czarne meteory, które zostawiają za sobą smugi popiołu – i zabijają słońce, tak jak cios dymiącej pięści Gregora zabija Oberyna.

Wiecie co jeszcze zostało nazwane ‘zemstą za Neda’? Ależ oczywiście, czerwona kometa. Ze Starcia królów:

Catelyn podniosła wzrok ku bladoczerwonej linii komety, która przecinała ciemnoniebieski firmament niczym długie zadrapanie na twarzy boga.
– Greatjon powiedział Robbowi, że dawni bogowie rozwinęli czerwoną flagę na znak zemsty za Neda.

Czerwona kometa dzieli symbolikę czarnego lodu/czerwonego ognia księżycowych meteorów. Tak jak one, czerwona kometa jest dzieckiem słońca i księżyca – przypomnijcie sobie, że uznałem, iż Azorem Ahai odrodzonym jest właśnie czerwona kometa, podczas gdy księżycowe meteory są jego smokami obudzonymi z kamienia – ale ogólnie rzecz biorąc, tak naprawdę są częściami większej całości, o tej samej naturze – tak jak Dany i Drogon lub Jon i Duch. Zarówno księżycowe meteory, jak i czerwona kometa pokazują nam symbolikę ‘fal krwi i nocy’, a fale nocy i krwi to właśnie zemsta księżyca. Czarne ametysty przypominają czarne meteory, smoki Azora Ahai, zaś czerwona kometa to Azor Ahai odrodzony. Mamy tu zatem doskonale dobraną parę. Zarówno meteory, jak i kometa mogą być uznane za przyczynę Długiej Nocy, a tym samym zemstę księżyca wymierzoną w słońce.

Fale krwi i nocy odnajdujemy pomiędzy warstwami Wiernego Przysiędze i Wdowiego Płaczu, a miecze te niegdyś stanowiły jedno, ciemny jak dym oręż z Valyriańskiej stali, miecz Neda Starka zwany Lodem. Greatjon porównuje czerwoną kometę do zemsty za neda, ale Arya porównuje ją do Lodu, pokrytego własną krwią Neda. To spawia, że Wierny Przysiędze i Wdowi Płacz zostają włączone do kategorii ‘lunarna zemsta’. I rzeczywiście, wręczając Wiernego Przysiędze Brienne Jaime mówi: ‘będziesz broniła córek Neda Starka jego własną stalą’. Na dodatek Wierny Przysiędze i Wdowi Płacz piją światło słońca i pociemniają kolory, o czym rozmawialiśmy już wielokrotnie. Widzimy zatem, że pociemnianie słońca jest już częścią symboliki mieczy wykutych z Lodu Neda. A zatem, są one doskonałymi symbolami księżycowej zemsty wobec słońca.

W razie gdybyście jeszcze do tego nie doszli, sam Ned Stark jest symbolem księżyca. Jego miecz, ‘Czarny Lód’, doskonały symbol Światłonoścy, spija jego własną krew – tak jak Światłonośca, miecz powstały z trupa księżyca wypił krew Nissy Nissy. Ned został ścięty, dokładnie tak jak ser Gregor. Miecz Gregora zostaje mu odebrany przez postać reprezentującą słońce, zaś miecz Neda zabiera Tywin. Miecz Neda zostaje zwrócony przeciwko niemu, tak jak Oberyn użył miecz Gregora przeciwko niemu (oczywiście, nieskutecznie). Na dodatek w chwili ścięcia Ned jest chory i w gorączce, tak jak księżycowa dziewica.

Ned był również Ręką Króla (Namiestnikiem) i został przez niego odrąbany. Wcześniej mieszkał w zamku z szarego kamienia, w którego murach płynie ciepła woda, ‘niczym krew w żyłach’. Pamiętacie, że Winterfell zostało spalone, prawda? W chwili gdy Lato i Bran ujrzeli coś co mogło być wykluwającym się smokiem? Mury pękają, Winterfell zostaje nazwane skorupką (shell)… a ciepła woda wypływa na zewnątrz, pokazując nam powódź księżycowej krwi. Szary kamień odpowiada Gregorowi opisanemu jako szary kamienny olbrzym. W rzeczy samej, w jednym z pierwszych rozdziałów Gry o tron Ned wygląda z punktu widzenia Brana jak olbrzym:

Spojrzał w górę. Jego pan ojciec, owinięty w futra i skóry, patrzył na niego ze swojego ogromnego rumaka niczym olbrzym.

Nigdy nie spotkałem się z tym, by ktoś próbował wytłumaczyć o co chodzi w tym zdaniu, więc uznałem, że warto tu o nim wspomnieć. W gruncie rzeczy, Ned i Winterfell są symbolami księżyca, a zatem dwa wcielenia księżycowej zemsty Neda – czerwona kometa i czarne ametysty – zaczynają mieć sporo sensu. Ametysty to pijące światło jadowite księżycowe węże, będące częścią jego córki, podczas gdy czerwona kometa symbolizuje jego miecz. Oczywiście, księżycowe meteory mogą reprezentować miecz księżyca lub jego dzieci. Widzimy zatem, że lunarna zemsta nadchodzi pod postacią miecza i dzieci. Przypomnijcie sobie, że w trzecim odcinku widzieliśmy jak Sandor Clegane gra rolę Azora Ahai odrodzonego jako piekielny ogar, w scenie gdzie jednocześnie ochraniał i mścił księżycową dziewicę, Sansę.

Ogólnie rzecz biorąc, wszystkie te symbole i metafory mówią nam to samo – słońce zabija księżyc, ale później księżyc mści się zasłaniając słońce. Możliwe, że to sugestia, iż miecz Azora Ahai został zwrócony przeciwko niemu, być może przez syna, którym mógł być Ostatni Bohater.


You can read the original text here.

Pozostałe odcinki tłumaczenia eseju The Mountain vs. the Viper and the Hammer of the Waters możecie znaleźć tutaj.

 

Góra kontra Żmija i Młot Wód: Pocałunki, Lament i Ostatni Bohater

LML przedstawia Mityczną Astronomię Lodu i Ognia

Góra kontra Żmija i Młot Wód: Pocałunki, Lament i Ostatni Bohater

(The Mountain vs. the Viper and the Hammer of the Waters), w przekładzie Bluetigera


W scenie pojedynku Oberyna z Gregorem zostało tylko kilka spraw do omówienia, więc wróćmy teraz do tej zamrożonej w czasie chwili, tuż po tym jak Gregor przyciągnął księcia do siebie, zaledwie kilka sekund przed zadaniem przez Czerwoną Żmiję ciosu, który odciąłby głowę jego przeciwnika. Pierwszym z tych tematów jest aspekt mitu Światłonoścy jako metafory płciowej prokreacji. To, że mamy tu walkę dwóch nieustraszonych wojowników nie sprawia, że George nie jest w stanie niepostrzeżenie wślizgnąć tu motywów związanych z obcowaniem! Założę się, że nawet nie pamiętacie, że pojawiają się tam następujące zdania (może byliście zbyt zajęci wymiotowaniem albo gwałtownym płaczem) – a zatem, oto i one:

Przerażony Tyrion zobaczył, że Góra otoczył księcia potężnym ramieniem i przycisnął go do piersi niczym kochanek.
– Elia z Dorne – usłyszeli głos ser Gregora, gdy przeciwnicy byli już tak blisko siebie, że mogliby się pocałować. Jego niski głos niósł się echem pod hełmem.

Mamy tutaj dwa odniesienia do prokreacji, pocałunki oraz bycie kochankami. W takim momencie! I to dokładnie wówczas gdy słońce i księżyc są blisko siebie, tworząc kolejne zaćmienie, w chwili symbolizującej wykucie Światłonoścy. Głos Gregora ‘niesie się echem’, grzmi, huczy (booms) pod hełmem, by pokazać co tak naprawdę tam się działo – to była eksplozja księżyca, wybuch prosto w twarz słońca. Drugi księżyc pocałował słońce, a potem wybuchł, uderzając odłamkami w jego twarz. Bum.

Następnie mamy symboliczne rany, pojawiające się na sam koniec. Tyrion myśli, że nigdy nie dowie się, czy Oberyn ‘zamierzał odrąbać głowę Gregora, czy też wepchnąć sztych przez wizurę jego hełmu’, podczas gdy Gregor wpycha swoje ‘stalowe palce’ w oczy Oberyna tuż przed zmiażdżeniem jego głowy. Obrażenia głowy oraz oślepienie, znane nam już symboliczne urazy, które przydarzają się słońcu i księżycowi. Stalowe palce podkreślają symbolikę kamiennej pięści Góry, która była zakrwawiona i dymiąca – szczególnie palce symbolizują meteory, na przykład w scenie z Benerrem w Czerwonej Świątyni, gdzie władający włóczniami żołnierze są palcami ‘Ognistej Ręki’. Stalowe palce przywodzą na myśl meteory, z których można wykonać stalowe miecze, co ma sporo sensu – a właśnie te palce oślepiają słońce, niszcząc jego twarz. Znów, sądzę, że wzmacnia to teorię, że to właśnie dym księżycowych meteorów zakrył słońce. Zwróćcie uwagę na to, że czarne smocze miecze znane jako valyriańska stal, są ‘ciemne jak dym’ (smoke-dark), wydaje mi się także, że istnieje możliwość, iż każda valyriańska stal zawiera czarny kamień księżycowych meteorytów. Widzimy nawet powiązanie pomiędzy dymem a tymi meteorami, a raczej mieczami symbolizującymi meteory.

Pojawia się również inna godna uwagi rana, czyli wybicie zębów Oberyna przez Górę. Wspominałem kilkukrotnie, że smocze zęby są opisywane jako czarne miecze lub sztylety, a także czarne diamenty – a kły i zęby jadowe Żmii pełnią taką samą rolę. A zatem, wyłamane zęby (splintered teeth) przedstawiają deszcz czarnych meteorów, niesławną nawałnicę mieczy. Oleista słoneczna włócznia Oberyna również została opisana jako ‘rozszczepiona/rozsypana w drzazgi’ (splintered), gdy Oberyn odrzucił ją na bok, po przebiciu Góry. Tak więc, znowo widzimy mocne symboliczne powiązanie, pokazujące nam, że wybite zęby Oberyna i jego roztrzaskana włócznia są tym samym.

Później rozległ się przyprawiający o mdłości chrzęst. Ellaria Sand krzyknęła przerażona, a śniadanie Tyriona trysnęło mu strugą z ust. Padł na kolana, rzygając boczkiem, kiełbasą i szarlotką, a także podwójną porcją jajecznicy z cebulą i ostrą dornijską papryką.

Smażone i gotowane jajka – księżyc był jajem, które zostało poparzone, ścięte, jak widzieliśy, więc nietrudno zrozumieć tę metaforę. Oh, popatrzcie: podwójna porcja – moim zdaniem, ponieważ były dwa ksieżyce. Ogniste dornijskie papryczki – czemu nie. Kiełbasy nie będę komentował. Wzmianka o mdłościach dobrze pasuje do całej tej symboliki związanej z trucizną – i odnosi się do otrutego i chorego księżyca. Lecz najważniejsze jest to, że Ellaria, od niedawna wdowa, wydaje z siebie wdowi płacz/jęk przerażenia (zgaduję, że inna zawodząca wdowa, Cersei, odnalazła teraz na nowo rozkosz).

Co do próby walki, to by było na tle! Coś takiego! Wstańcie teraz i przeciągnijcie nogi, no chyba, że prowadzicie samochód. W takim wypadku to chyba nie najlepszy pomysł.  Everybody Hurts zespołu REM to świetny przerywnik muzyczny, ale dla jadących za wami może okazać się dość irytujący. Odkładając nawiązania do popkultury lat 90-tych na bok, właśnie dotarliśmy do końca pojedynku i samego rozdziału, ale chicałbym teraz przez chwilę zająć się motywem wdowiego płaczu – właśnie dostaliśmy solidną dawkę lamentujących wdów, rozrywających uszy zgrzytów metalu o metal oraz pisków, na dodatek miecz Wdowi Płacz to po prostu kawał świetnej symboliki, związany z wieloma motywami o których już dzisiaj rozmawialiśmy.

Wygląda na to, że wszystkie zawodzące wdowy pojawiające się w scenach wykucia Światłonoścy odnoszą się do krzyku udręki i ekstazy Nissy Nissy, który rozłupał księżyc, oraz do ksieżycowych meteorów postrzeganych jako łzy księżyca. Miecz Wdowi Płacz jest pokryty falami krwi i nocy, które obrazowo opisują nam wszystkie rzeczy przychodzące ze zniszczonego księżyca, co samo w sobie sprawia, że jest mieczem z księżycowych meteorów. Wdowi Płacz i Wierny Przysiędze, wykonane z niemal czarnego miecza Neda zwanego Lodem, reprezentują czarny lód pokryty krwią, kolejne nawiązanie do księżycowych meteorów, które znamy i kochamy. A te są łzami księżyca, dziei czemu widzimy, że Wdowi Płacz do w gruncie rzeczu symbol księżycowych łez, na dodatek nazwany na pamiątkę jego przedśmiertnego jęku.

Zastanówcie się nad cyklem życia Wdowiego Płaczu: zaczyna jako czarny lód, po czym zostaje splamiony pewnego rodzaju krwawą ofiarą. Gdy zostaje podzielony i przekuty, nadal wygląda tak, jakby był pokryty krwią – ale teraz posiada również gardę, która ‘płonie złotem’ i złotą lwią głowicę. Ten ciąg wydarzeń pokazuje nam cykl życiowy czerwonej komety. Zaczyna go jako kometa bez ogona – w gruncie rzeczy kula czarnego lodu i żelaza – a potem zostaje pokryta krwią księżyca, stając się krwawiącą gwiazdą i ostatecznie, zaczyna płonąć czerwonym ogieniem, stająć się ognistą gwiazdą. Zauważycie, że to mniej więcej kolejnośc wydarzeń mających według mitu miejsce przy wykuciu Światonoścy – od dymiącego miecza, przez krwawy miecz, po płonący miecz. Całkiem nieźle, co nie? Miecz Neda zostaje pokryty krwią, a potem pojawia się na nowo jako dwa miecze o płonących rękojeściach, dokładnie tak jak Światłonośca, któy został pokryty krwią ofiar, by mógł zapłonąć. Głowice Wiernego Przysiędze i Wdowiego Płaczu w kształcie lwich głów w szczególności pokazują nam, że miecz musi wcześniej zostać zapłodnionym przez słońce, że musi wypić jego ogień – i rzeczywiście, jak już kilkukrotnie powtarzałem, w pierwszej scenie w której widzimy te dwa miecze pojawia się wzmianka o tym, że piją światło słońca. Zasadniczo, krew i ogień zostają dodane do czarnego lodu, w wyniku czego powstaje Światłonośca, czerwony miecz lub czerwona kometa.

Rozpad komety na dwie części jest podkreślany nie tylko przez rozdzielenie Lodu na dwa czarno-czerwone miecze, ale również przez scenę, w której Pani Kamienne Serce ogląda Wiernego Przysiędze po pojmaniu Brienne: rubinowe oczy lwiej głowy na głowicy miecza wyglądają jak dwie czerwonie gwiazdy. Dwie czerwone gwiazdy – dwie połówki czerwonej komety. Nie potrafię sobie wyobrazić do czego innego mogłyby się odnosić. Skoro – jak się wydaje – stanowią paralelę samego podzielonego miecza, myślę, że to bezpieczny wniosek.

Wspominałem, że złamana włócznia Oberyna to nawiązanie do podzielonej komety, a teraz chcę zauważyć, że te wszystkie rozdzielające się komety mogą tak naprawdę odnosić się do złamanego miecza Ostatniego Bohatera – wydaje mi się, że właśnie on jest tutaj ważny. Płonący miecz Berica pękł w połowie, podobnie jak włócznia Oberyna, miecz Tytana z Braavos, miecz Neda… a miecz Ostatniego Bohatera ponoć pękł z powodu chłodu. Na puruprowych godach pojawia się ciekawe nawiązanie do złamanych miecz-Światłonośców – i być może również Ostatniego Bohatera – w scenie, gdy Joffrey nadaje imię Wdowiemu Płaczowi:

Lord Tywin zaczekał do końca, nim wręczył królowi swój dar: miecz. Wykonaną z drewna wiśni, złota oraz impregnowanej czerwonej skóry pochwę zdobiły złote ćwieki w kształcie lwich głów. Sansa zauważyła, że wszystkie mają oczy z rubinów. Gdy Joffrey wydobył oręż i uniósł go nad głowę, w sali balowej zapadła cisza. Pokryta czerwonymi i czarnymi zmarszczkami stal lśniła w świetle poranka.

Miecz poranka? Z całą pewnością nie jest to biały miecz, a z Joffreya żaden biały rycerz. Czy to znaczy, że miecz Ostatniego Bohatera był czarny, niepodobny do białego oręża znanego jako Miecz Poranka, Świt? Nieustannie powracam to tego pomysłu – wygląda na to, że nie mogło być inaczej. Zakrwawiona pięść Gregora dymiła w ‘chłodnym powietrzu poranka’, więc może rzeczywiście coś w tym jest. A może, to po prostu odniesienie do Wojny Świtu – coś podobnego widzieliśmy podczas Bitwy nad Zielonymi Widłami, gdzie armia Tywina rozwineła się w świetle świtu niczym żelazna róża o lśniących kolcach. W tamtej scenie ludzi z Północy reprezentowali głównie Karstarkowie, nazywani ‘wilkami białej gwiazdy’, ponieważ ich herb przedstawia białe słońce zimy. To właśnie ta bitwa, podczas której Tyrion zostaje uderzony przez ‘gwiazdę poranną’ (morgensztern). Chodzi o to, że po jednej stronie widzimy białe miecze i symbole gwiazdy porannej, a po drugiej, wśród sił mrocznego solarnego króla, czarne żelazo. To Wojna Świtu. Nie sądzę zatem, że każda broń lśniąća w świetle porananka musi być symbolem miecza poranka, choć zawże warto to rozważyć.

W każdym razie, miło zobaczyć trochę oleju w Wiernym Przysiedze – naoliwioną (w oryginale oiled) pochwę z czerwonej skóry. Składa się również z ‘drewna wiśni’ (cherrywood), co może sugerować spalone drewno, ponieważ rozżarzony węgielek w ogniu może być nazwany cherry, a wiśniowe drewno jest zazwyczaj czerwone. I jak zwykle, pojawia się wzmianka o czerwonych i czarnych zmarszczkach Wdowiego Płaczu. Scena trwa nadal:

 – Wspaniały – oznajmił Mathis Rowan.
– Miecz godny pieśni – rzekł lord Redwyne.
– Królewska broń – dodał ser Kevan Lannister.

Królewski miecz, słoneczny miecz, miecz związany z pieśnią. Rozmawialiśmy już o motywie śpiewu i o tym jak odnosi się do smoków i księżyca. Oczywiście, mamy księżycowe śpiewaczki (Moonsingers) Jogos Nhai, wyznawców Kultu Gwieździstej Mądrości, którzy śpiewają do gwiazd, oraz wilkory śpiewające gwiazdiom, a ostatnie zdanie Gry o tron brzmi: po raz pierwszy od setek lat noc ożyła muzyką smoków. Sądzę, żę róg ‘Władca Smoków’ (Dragonbinder) oraz motywy ‘okrzyku boleści i ekstazy’ oraz Wdowego Płaczu również wpasowują się w tę symbolikę. Innym razem lepiej przyjrzymy się motywom związanym z dźwiękiem. Tymczasem, kontynuujmy tę scenę:

Król Joffrey był tak podekscytowany, że wydawało się, iż ma ochotę natychmiast kogoś zabić. Ze śmiechem przeszył mieczem powietrze.
– Wspaniały oręż wymaga wspaniałego imienia, panowie! Jak mam go nazwać?
Sansa przypomniała sobie Lwi Kieł, miecz, który Arya wyrzuciła do Tridentu, oraz Pożeracza Serc, którego kazał jej pocałować przed bitwą. Zastanawiała się, czy Margaery też będzie musiała całować miecz.

Zmuszanie księżycowych dziewic do całowania słonecznych mieczy to właśnie to czym zajmuje się słońce – mamy tu świetny przykład takiej symboliki. Wrzucanie mieczy będących jak kły lub zęby do rzeki… ahoj morski smoku!

Goście wykrzykiwali proponowane nazwy, lecz Joffrey odrzucił chyba z tuzin nim wreszcie usłyszał taką, która przypadła mu do gustu.
– Wdowi Płacz! – krzyknął. – Tak jest! Wiele kobiet uczyni wdowami! – Znowu machnął mieczem. – A gdy spotkam stryja Stannisa, przetnę jego magiczny oręż wpół.
Joff spróbował wyprowadzić cięcie w dół, zmuszając ser Balona Swanna do pośpiesznego kroku w tył. Na widok miny ser Balona sala ryknęła śmiechem.

Sugerowałem już wcześniej, że Balon Swann to zapewne księżycowa postać – a tu niemal zostaje ugodzony przez czarny miecz słońca – wygląd jego ‘twarzy’ jest ponoć szczególnie zabawny. Co do motywu złamanego Światłonoścy, pojawia się tutaj dwukrotnie. Miecz Neda reprezentuje Światłonoścę podzielonego na dwie części, a Joffrey sugeruje, że przetnie miecz Stannisa wpół.

Mamy również kolejną wskazówkę co do tego, że Ostatni Bohater i prawdopodbnie jego drugi miecz wykonany ze smoczej stali są blisko związani z Azorem Ahai i jego ognistym mieczem. Zaważycie, że Joffrey odrzucił dwanaście nazw przed wybraniem kolejnej – a za każdym razem gdy widzimy ten wzór 12+1, zaczynam myśleć o Ostatnim Bohaterze, którego dwunastu towarzyszy zginęło podczas wyprawy. Widzimy tutaj złamane miecze-Światłonośców razem z ‘matematyką Ostatniego Bohatera’, więc skłaniam się ku temu, że istnieje pomiędzy nimi związek.

W rzeczy samej, Joffrey pokazuje nam więcej matematyki Ostatniego Bohatera w śnie Jaime’a na pieńku czardrzewa. Jaime znajdue się w podziemiach Casterly Rock, a on i Brienne władają identycznymi płonącymi mieczami. To trochę tak jakby to był jeden podzielony miecz, zwłąszcza z tego powodu, że najpierw przez pewien czas widzimy jeden miecz, a w chwilę potem pojawiają się dwa. Pomyślcie o tym, że Wierny Przysiędze i Wdowi Płacz są bliźniaczymi mieczami powstałymi z jednego. Fale krwawej czerwieni i nocnej czerni Wiernego Przysiędze doskonale kontrastują z bladymi, srebrno-niebieskimi płomienami mieczy Jaime’a i Brienne. W każdym razie, to zdanie brzmi następująco:

Był tam również Joffrey, syn, którego wspólnie spłodzili, a za nimi tuzin ciemniejszych postaci o złotych włosach.

Jak na razie, moim najlepszym pomysłem na temat Ostatniego Bohatera jest to, że jest synem Azora Ahai – Azorem Ahai narodzonym na nowo jako dziecko wypełniające dziedzictwo swego ojca – a być może, działającym wbrew temu dziedzictwu. Bez względu na to, który pomysł jest poprawny, patrzenie na Jaime’a jak na Azora Ahai jest tutaj kuszące, ponieważ włada płonącym mieczem i odniósł ważne obrażenia ręki i oka (jak na przykład Jon Snow). Podobnie jest z patrzeniem jego syna Joffreya jak na Ostatniego Bohatera, prowadzącego dwanaście ciemnych kształtów, które w pewien sposób go przypominają. Dwunastu towarzyszy Ostatniego Bohatera zginęło, więc może takie jest znaczenie tego, że dwanaście kształtów za Joffreyem to cienie.

Joffrey jest, że się tak wyrażę, synem słońa, dokładnie tak jak Quentyn Martell, który jest nazywany ‘synem słońca’, ponieważ jest synem słońca Dorne w ogólnym znaczeniu, a w szczególności synem władcy Dorne. Uważam, że ten motyw ‘syna słońca’ (sun’s son) jest tym samym co motyw ‘drugiego syna’ (second sun), który widzimy tu i ówdzie. (W języku angielskim słońce,- sun – brzmi podobnie do son, syn). Komety i meteory, w naszej opowieści dzieci słońca, rzeczywście mogą rozświetlić niebo tak bardzo, że wydają się być drugim słońcem na niebie, tak jak w legendzie ludu Ojibwa o ‘Długo-Ogoniastej-Gwieździe-Wspinającej-się-Po-Niebiosach’, którą omawialiśmy w ostatnim odcinku. George robi coś podobnego, gdy opisuje pożar po katastrofie w Hardhome 600 lat wcześniej, nazywając go: ‘tak gorącym, że obserwatorzy stojący na położonym daleko na południe Murze myśleli, że słońce wstaje na północy’. Innym razem przyjrzymy się dokładniej motywowi drugiego słońca, ale na razie, wspomnę jedynie, że chorągiew kompanii najemników znanej jako ‘Drudzy Synowe’ (Second Suns) jest… (czekajcie na to)… złamany miecz.

Dun dun dun.

Oczywiście, wiem co teraz powiecie, Joffrey nie jest zbyt bohaterski – rzeczywiście, z pewnością nie jest. Jest sadystą i wyrasta na psychopatę. Jednak, kilka rzeczy związanych z Joffreyem wydaje odnosić się do Ostatniego Bohatera. Umarł gdy miał trzynaście lat, a czerwona kometa pojawiła się na niebie w poranek jego trzynastego dnia imienia. Królewkie lizusy z Czerwonej Twierdzy nazwały ją Kometą Joffreya. Niektórzy uważają, że Ostatni Bohater był tą samą osobą co Nocny Król, trzynasty Lord Dowódca, który rządził przez trzynaście lat nim został obalony – w ten sposób powstaje powiązanie pomiędzy tymi trzynastkami i Ostatnim Bohaterem stojącym na czele grupy trznastu (dwunastu towarzyszy plus on sam). Być może psychopatyczna natura Joffreya to wskazówka co do tego, że Ostatni Bohater stał się Nocnym Królem i popełnił mroczne czyny.

W każdym razie, poza powiązaniem z czerwoną kometą, Joffrey włada Wdowim Płaczem, idealnym mieczem dla odrodzonego Azora Ahai. Dwa miecze które posiadał przez otrzymaniem Wdowiego Płaczu również opowiadają ciekawą historię. Najpierw miał Lwi Kieł, który został wrzucony do rzeki – tak, to zabawna scena, ale pokazuje nam również symbol meteora-jako-kła ciśnięty do wody, niczym morski smok. Jego drugim mieczem był Pożeracz Sec, który wydaje się dobrym symbolem komety, która przebiła serce księżyca, a być może również odległym echem sceny w której Daenerys zjada serce konia, które również reprezentowało kometę.

Teraz muszę wspomnieć o tym, że po prostu nie jestem w stanie nie dostrzegać w tej sekwencji trzech mieczy, którą kończy miecz nocy, ognia i krwi, opowieści o Azorze Ahai wykuwającym trzy miecze. Trzy próby zahartowania oręża miały miejsce w wodzie, sercu lwa i ostatecznie w Nissie Nissie – a miecze Joffreya stanowią ich paralelę. Pierwszy miecz został wrzucony do rzeki, więc mamy wodę. Drugi, Pożeracz Serc, miał na głowni lwią głowę. No coż, wszystkie trzy miecze mają lwią symbolikę, więc to niezbyt pomocne. Jednakże, głowica Pożeracza Serc przedstawia lwa z rubinowym sercem pomiędzy szczękami – tak więc, przy grugim mieczy rzeczywiście pojawia się bezpośrednie nawiązanie do lwiego serca. A potem pojawia się trzeci miecz, Wdowi Płacz, z dwoma czerwonymi gwiazdami oczu i całą tą symboliką krwi, nocy i lamentu, którą już omówiłem. Dwanaście proponowanych nazw takiego królewskiego miecza do niego nie pasuje, ale trzynasta trafia prosto w cel.

Czerwona gwiazdy-oczy są tym samym co czerwone oczy-słońca, a być może przypominacie sobie, że czerwone oczy Ducha zostały opisane jako ‘dwa czerwone słońca’ w scenie z Nawałnicy mieczy. Zarówno Duch, jak i Jon Snow posiadają symbolikę Ostatniego Bohatera, więc to, że widzimy u nich motyw drugiego słońca wydaje się ciekawe. Jeśli teoria R+L=J jest prawdziwa, Jon jest drugim synem Rhaegara, a Tyrion byłby drugim synem Aerysa jeśłi to rzeczywiście Szalony Król jest jego ojcem. Wierny Przysiędze to czarny miecz o dwóch gwiazdach-oczach, podczas gdy Duch jest białym wilkiem o dwóch oczach jak czerwone gwiazdy. I znów, to wszystko sprawia, że zaczynam się zastanawiać, czy ‘miecz poranka’ był czarnym czy białym mieczem. Zastanówcie się: Jon śni o władaniu mieczem swego ojca, ‘Czarnym Lodem’, posiada czarny miecz Długi Pazur, a w innym śnie włada czerwonym mieczem i nosi zbroję z czarnego lodu. A zatem, powinien władać czarny miecz, prawda? Z drugiej strony, Jon jest silnie związany z Mieczem Poranka, jak wykazała moja przyjaciółka Sly Wren w jej świetnym eseju opublikowanym na Westeros.org pod tytułem ”Od Śmierci po Świt: Jon powstanie jako Miecz Poranka”. Nawet jego czarny miecz posiada wilczą głowę z ‘bladego kamienia’ jako głowicę, co przywodzi na myśl blady kamień, z którego ponoć jest wykonany Świt. A na dodatek, w jakiś sposób połączy ze swoim białym wilkiem, więc… powinien władać białym mieczem!

Jak mówiłem, dostrzegam dowody na poparcie każdej opcji, więc tak naprawdę nie wiem jak ma być. Nie możemy wykluczyć jakiegoś dziwnego połączenia dwóch złamanych mieczy, co pasowałoby do ogólnej taoistycznej filozofii – yin i yang – mówiącej o równowadze przeciwieństw, która przenika całą serię.

I właśnie na tym kończy się nasza mała wyprawa w tematykę Ostatniego Bohatera. Z całą pewnością wspomnimy o nim tu i ówdzie na przestrzeni całych esejów, w końcu jest jedną z najbardziej enigmatycznych zagadek starożytnego Westeros. Jestem pewien, że w końcu odkryjemy prawdę o Ostatnim Bohaterze, choć z całą pewnością musimy jeszcze spojrzeć na niego pod kątem rodu Starków. Na razie, widzimy, że motyw złamanej broni-Światłonoścy konsekwentnie pojawia się obok wzoru 12+1 Ostatniego Bohatera – i obok postaci reprezentujących Azora Ahai odrodzonego. Ostatni Bohater miał ponoć złamany miecz, więc wygląda na to, że wszystko ładnie się sumuje… do trzynastki.


You can read the original text here.

Pozostałe odcinki tłumaczenia eseju The Mountain vs. the Viper and the Hammer of the Waters możecie znaleźć tutaj.